Metal is like a sponge: capable of sucking up any foreign juices. Classical music? We’ve seen that thousands of times since before In The Nightside Eclipse. Country? Not too common, but there’s a number of stoner and folk metal bands that incorporate its imagery. But flamenco? Sure, Allegaeon has the odd interlude, but it’s hardly integral to their sound, feeling more like a wacky gimmick than a serious crossover. Impureza take offense to the absence of flamenco metal, due to their proud Spanish herita- wait, they’re French?! Yes, despite the Montezuma imagery, Spanish lyrics and flamenco incorporation, oddball death metal fanatics Impureza are from the land of baguettes and brie instead of tapas and paella. La Caída de Tonatiuh1, meaning ‘The Fall of Tonatiuh’ (the Aztec sun god,) is only their second album in their 12 years of existence, so suffice to say those who worship at the altar of Quetzalcoatl have grown hungry.

It’s flamenco for breakfast as the opener releases an unrelenting barrage of non-brutal, skillfully plucked Spanish guitars and traditional percussion. The blastbeats don’t start until the second song, where the Morbid Angel stylings reveal themselves. When Impureza release the reins, they play fast, riff-centered death metal, executed with fearsome energy. The drums pummel in classic fashion, the bass adds smooth technicality, and the vocals are coarse and brutal, incorporating feral group vocals along the chunky roar. Sitting still will be impossible with these riffs playing; technical but catchy, bludgeoning but still easy enough to read, and incorporating oriental elements in the leads. On its own, the death metal meat of the dish is absolutely solid and enjoyable, if not quite revolutionary.

While I don’t personally speak Spanish, the titles and cover art go a long way in conveying the subject matter: Aztec history and mythology, both woefully underrepresented in metal. This is also where the flamenco comes in, lending a welcome Spanish touch to the burly death metal at hand. Part of the pluckery is shoved into interludes, but it’s most effective when it weaves in and out of the metal, creating surprising melodic harmonies and providing breathing spaces in the sonic assault. In fact, I wish they would have applied it this way more, even though the album is admittedly more varied as a result. “El Nuovo Reino De Los Ahorcados” is the best example of how well the combination works as it opens with the classical plucking and gradually adds in metal drumming and riffing until a storm of Spanish death metal arises.

The Mesoamerican slaughterhouse only takes one real blow, although it doesn’t topple the mighty empire. Though the master is admirably dynamic, which the drums especially benefit from, the thick layer of guitars sounds somewhat muffled and compacted, as if buried underneath an ancient pyramid. Considering the riffs are the focus and the guitars are the overpowering elements, a lot of detail is lost in the muddy smush, which particularly undermines the too-few moments where the compositions go all-in on the death flamenco. This is not entirely a fault of the mix; the other levels are fairly balanced, and the audibility of the melodic and technical bass is a welcome touch. But the guitars feel cramped to a point of bleeding together, a detriment to the otherwise impeccable music.

It doesn’t deliver the killing blow to the Aztec history lesson, merely smudging an album otherwise expertly written and energetically executed. The unlikely partnership of flamenco and death metal works quite beautifully (despite my gripe over the relative heterogeneity of the mixture,) and it fits the Aztec mythology and history like the stones of the Saksaywaman walls. With performances both primitively brutal and technically deft, this oddball brand of death metal marries two unlikely styles into a cohesive whole that fits the fully realized concept of the Aztec apocalypse. It’s unusual, catchy, and brutally convincing, and it seems Season of Mist can do no wrong as usual. I’d still throw a virgin into a volcano for a more defined guitar, though.


Rating: 3.5/5.0
DR: 9 | Format Reviewed: 320 kbps mp3
Label: Season of Mist
Websites: impureza.bandcamp.com | impureza.eu | facebook.com/impurezaconquista
Releases Worldwide: November 10th, 2017

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  1. I had to check the spelling three times
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  • John Mosley

    Might tide me over until the next Acrania release.

  • Brutalist_Receptacle

    Mesoamerican History Lesson

    There was no “Aztecs” nor “Aztec Empire” They were Tenoch Mexica, and formed a Triple Alliance with Texcoco and Tlacopan.

    There are no “pyramids” in Mesoamerica. Those are sacred, “artificial mountains,” or temples. None come to a point, none are flat on the sides.

    Cultural confusion: The Mexica priest seems to be conducting his sacrifices on Maya temples.

    • GardensTale

      Interesting, I’d researched the subject a little for the review but those facts did not come up. Do you know this from your profession or just an amateur history enthusiast?

      • Kryopsis

        I think Brutalist_Receptacle is just really good with all kinds of concrete data!

      • Brutalist_Receptacle

        Profession: I am an historian of Mexico.

        • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

          You should have said that in all bold caps!
          Also, aboriginal Mexicans didn’t speak Spanish and Flamenco music is from Spain, not Mexico. The music is cool, no doubt about it, but apparently they didn’t do much (if any) historical/cultural research to back their concept. It seems more like they just threw together a few misconceptions and called it a concept.

          • GardensTale

            I assumed the flamenco was brought in by the conquistadors

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            There were, in fact, a couple “musicians” with Cortés, but of the military variety: trumpet, drums, etc., used mainly for military purposes such as musters, but also to accompany religious ceremonies like Mass. The Mesoamericans also had thousands of years of “musical” practice and traditions.

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            Flamenco is just one of many styles of music brought in by the conquistadors.
            The main thing the conquistadors brought in was the guitar. That and syphillis. But musicwise the guitar has proven more influential than syphillis, at least since the discovery of antibiotics.
            That said, Mexican music is not greatly influenced by Flamenco, it’s more influenced by other styles of Spanish music.

          • GardensTale

            Well, the songs do deal with conquistadors :p

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            You have that wrong. Syphilis is the most historical disease: unlike most diseases, syphillis has a beginning in the historical record. 1493. There is no historical evidence in Old World of syphilis BEFORE 1493. Yet something like appeared abruptly after Columbus.Without a doubt, syphilis is the most controversial subject in all medical history. It may be safe to say that we understand its history today as unitarian: that syphilis is just one syndrome of a world wide disease, treponematosis.

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            Maybe I got my syphillis confused with my gonorrhea. ;)

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            Everyone has been infecting everyone else since the Garden of Eden.

          • [not a Dr]

            I’m no doctor, but I’m pretty sure that would be yo momma.

          • Eli Valcik

            hmmm, didn’t think I’d be learning all of this stuff today. I just came here to see if I’d like a metal band. But thanks.

          • [not a Dr]

            Flamenco is associated with Spanish culture, but it’s gypsy music. It comes from far beyond Spain.

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            And when “flamenco” guitar originated, there was no such thing as a unified “Spain”! After the Reconquest of the Iberian peninsula, Spain was no more than some loosely confederated provinces and kingdoms, with Castille and Aragon dominant. In fact, the music is more North African Arabic than Spanish.

          • Peter Rabbit

            Actually flamenco music comes not from North Africa, but from Flanders!
            If I remember well, when Spain was an empire and had territories in the Low Countries, it was custom in flemish courts to play musical pieces known as “pavanas”, that used acoustic guitars in a manner similar to modern flamenco.
            When that music came to Spain, the local romani population liked it a lot, and started replicating it along with some of their personal touches (like the singing style which is, that’s true, pretty similar to bereber and muslim singing). That’s why it’s called “flamenco” (which means “flemish” in spanish), and why romani music in Spain is so different of what you can find in, say, the Balkans.

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            Not exactly. There is much conjecture about the “origins” of flamenco. Yes, the term is Spanish for “Fleming.” But it was applied pejoratively to some mid-sixteenth century courtiers in Flanders, casting them as corrupt and flamboyant, like gitanos from southern Spain (Andalucia), but it had more to do with lifestyle than musical practice or style. But it can be traced as a style even earlier: “Arab songs” may have been adopted by the Phlegms, but the Roma in Andalusia were playing them earlier. The consensus, however, is that, in still-Moorish Andalucia, the gitanos were practicing this musical form in the mid-fifteenth century. They were persecuted and dispersed, spreading the practice. As late as the nineteenth century, it was still a form associated and practiced mostly in Andalusia. The twentieth century saw its spread and commercialization to the form we recognize today.

          • Peter Rabbit

            I’m assuming autocorrect put “phlegms” where it should be “flemish”, right?

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            Well now, the result of last week’s competition when we asked you to find a derogatory term for the Belgians. Well, the response was enormous and we took quite a long time sorting out the winners. There were some very clever entries. Mrs Hatred of Leicester said ‘let’s not call them anything, let’s just ignore them’ (applause starts vigorously, but he holds his hands up for silence) and a Mr St John of Huntingdon said he couldn’t think of anything more derogatory than ‘Belgians’. (cheers and applause; a girl in showgirl costume comes on and holds up placards through next bit) But in the end we settled on three choices: number three… the Sprouts (placard ‘The Sprouts’), sent in by Mrs Vicious of Hastings… very nice ; number two… the Phlegms (placard) from Mrs Childmolester of Worthing; but the winner was undoubtedly from Mrs No-Supper-For-You from Norwood in Lancashire… Miserable Fat Belgian Bastards. (placard; roar of applause) Very good – thank you, Carol. (

          • ssorg

            this is 100% classic
            I think when listening as a kid I never heard “the sprouts” or “the phlegms” because I was laughing too hard at “couldn’t think of anything more derogatory than ‘Belgians'”

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            Hey, don’t call them “gitanos”! Gitano is Spanish for gypsy…

          • WHO ARE YOU?!?!

          • “…and what did you do with _Receptacle?” – one could ask.

            But seriously, this thread is classy. A true pleasure to read.

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            Flamenco is more Gypsy and Moorish (North African Arabic) than Spanish.

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            “Roma” not “gypsy.” And I said that.

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            Hell, I commited a non-PC faux-pas! But you didn’t mention the Roma people…

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            YEAH BUT YOU REPEATED THE MOOPS. MOORS.

          • John Mosley

            It’s Moops

          • [not a Dr]

            Since your history cred seems legit, I’m switching from assertions to questions. Wasn’t the Reconquista just the Moors getting fed up and packing followed by the Catholic Kings just taking a ride through the cities that they abandoned and “reconquering” them?
            I had a Morrocan neighbor who told me (I was curious about what they were taught in school about that) that the Morrocan culture is very city-centric: when they moved to the Iberian peninsula, they just took the cities and let the villages and the farmlands do whatever they wanted and continue worshipping whatever they wanted as long as tribute still came in to the cities.

          • herrschobel

            there is no such thing as history

        • SoLeftISeeRight

          I had to go listen to Brujeria to counteract all your edumacating in this thread today.

    • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

      So, if these guys want to become the Nile of Mesoamerican Death Metal they need to do more research.

    • [not a Dr]

      They are pyramidal, even if they are not pure pyramids. Egyptian pyramids are also series of steps, but their finishing touches smooth up the sides.

      • Brutalist_Receptacle

        No. A pyramid must, by definition, have triangular sides that converge to a point. No such structure exists in Mesoamerica. Granted, it is an accepted term, THOUGH INCORRECT.

        • basenjibrian

          Is Pluto a Planet?

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            Should non-proper nouns be capitalized?

          • The box wins again!

          • basenjibrian

            It’s more Metal.

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            Thus rendering your user name
            COMPLETELY NON-METAL

          • basenjibrian

            ROFLOL. Basenjis are actually pretty metal. Despite being cute and elegant and 25 pounds, they can be…difficult. Unlike golden retrievers and their ilk, they don’t exist to serve us. I think my basenji (R.I.P.) nipped most of my friends at least once.

          • Monsterth Goatom

            I heard they yodel instead of bark. Is that true?

          • basenjibrian

            Their range of sounds is strange and includes yodeling.
            basenjis are considered “primitive dogs” similar to other breeds like Canaan Dogs and feral dogs. Really smart-but smart more like cats than dogs.

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            No, Pluto is a dog. Mickey’s dog.

        • [not a Dr]

          No such structure from the pre-industrial times exists anywhere: they are all close approximations. Call them ziggurats all you want, when people ask “what?”, you’ll end up talking about pyramids, but made of giant steps.

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            No. That is projecting an occidental interpretation on to the New World, a civilization that developed in complete isolation from the other sites (Egypt, Greece, China, Fertile Crescent). The Mesoamerican “pyramid” can be best described as a truncated pyramid with stepped sides (therefore, not a pyramid); the flat space on top was generally reserved as the location for a small building, believed to be a temple. In its simplest form, the combined pyramid-temple is square to rectangular in plan and has a single stairway leading to the temple building on the upper level. This generic pyramid-temple form is capable of many permutations, and these differences appear to be mostly a function of time and place.
            These are assumed to be sacred sites where the most important religious rites took place and are generally thought to symbolize mountains as places of origin of ancestors and the homes of their spirits; as such, they sometimes served as burial places for important personages. More abstractly, the great pyramid-temples of the Maya, Toltec, and Aztec expressed their vision of the ordering of the universe, with their four sides facing the cardinal directions and their four sides facing the cardinal directions and their superimposed platforms and temple indicating the hierarchical ordering of the natural world. SOURCE: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures
            Edited by Dav́d Carrasco

          • [not a Dr]

            Complete isolation is currently under investigation, but I get your point. The Inca and pre-incan “pyramids in Peru are called “Huaca”, but it’s a lot easier to explain their shape and convey religious importance to the profane by saying pyramid. Most people will lack the in-depth knowledge of the subject to associate all the cultural baggage of Egypt to the New World structures.

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            Yeah. Share the sources currently under investigation, please, regarding visitors to the New World. Ancient aliens and Israelites will not be accepted. Waiting. The clock is ticking.

          • [not a Dr]

            Do you understand Spanish? I’ll have to scour what my family shares, so it may take some time. Some of them do share NASA’s proof that the Bible is real, but some of them post articles about research being made into pre-colombian commerce accross the Atlantic and an Inca expedition to Polynesia. More credible (to me) sources were telling me about a letter sent from Queen Isabel to the captain of the Santa Maria telling him to stay well away from the Morrocan’s mines when they got to the other side of the sea.
            I know it sounds like conspiracy theories and not too different from your aliens or israeli, but they seemed plausible to me.

          • Brutalist_Receptacle

            YOUR FAMILY: HIGH AF

          • [not a Dr]

            If only… But most of them are rational enough. The serious stuff gets lost among the catholic fanaticism.

          • [not a Dr]

            About pre-colombine exchanges: No fuimos nosotros (derrotero de Poniente): del tráfico transoceánico precolombino a la conquista y colonización de América (1992), by Luisa Isabel Álvarez de Toledo (a.k.a. la Duquesa Roja)

          • [not a Dr]

            Inca expedition to Polynesia:
            Historia y Arte del Perú Antiguo (2002) – Federico Kauffmann Doig.
            Los peruanos en Oceanía (1967) – Hermann Buse de la Guerra
            Historia Marítima del Perú, Época Prehistórica. Tomo II,Volumen 2, p. 859 al 928. Lima, 1973
            Túpac Yupanqui: Descubridor de Oceanía (2006) – José Antonio del Busto
            Túpac Yupanqui, el resplandeciente (2017) – José Antonio del Busto

          • [not a Dr]

            (You actually managed to put pressure on me with “The clock is ticking.”)
            Since you are a Historian of Mexico, I’ll assume you understand Spanish, señor (¿profesor? ¿maestro?) Brutalisto Receptaclo.

          • Tofu muncher
    • Carlos Marrickvillian

      Also the Mexican people weren’t green with glowing eyes, red loincloths was so 1050 and giant sky eyeballs (skyballs) didn’t exist until the great 2015 metal sphereopocalypse.

      • Brutalist_Receptacle

        No. In 1050, the Mexica were still dog-eating, naked nomads, looking for a place to settle, where they could realize their destiny and in the meantime apply their warlike nature as mercenaries. The people we recognize as “Mexica” arrived in the Valley of Mexico in the thirteenth century. They lived on Chapultepec (Grasshopper Hill) and got strong by devouring the serpents they found there. Eventually to descend the hill and make the Valley their own.

      • basenjibrian

        If you listen to the Tangerine Menace, Mexicans are certainly the under-the-bed boogiemen of our nightmares.

    • Cherd

      Oh my god you guys, Brutalist Receptacle broke character, and it was amazing! It’s like when you’re a kid and you find out Santa Claus has actually been an academic historian toiling away on the tenure-track at some state college all along.

      • Or like in Scooby Doo when they unmask the bad guy frightening children at the metal concert.

      • ssorg

        calm down he’s still in boldfont

        • Brutalist_Receptacle

          WHUT

      • A Feed From Cloud Mountain

        Nailed it. The illusion is shattered and reality is far cooler than I would have expected.

        Also today I learned the US education system is a let down when it comes to Mexican history.

        • Brutalist_Receptacle

          YOU MISSPELLED “THE US EDUCATION SYSTEM IS A LET DOWN”

    • Solrac Avan

      You only missed the fact that Spanish culture and heritage is not the same as Mesoamerican culture, hell it´s not even the same as Mexican culture. But other than that I appreciate your input.

      • Brutalist_Receptacle

        YEAH UM I DIDNT SAY ANYTHING ABOUT SPANISH CULTURE AND HERITAGE. AND MESOAMERICAN CULTURE IS AT THE HEART OF DEEP MEXICO AND ITS CULTURE.

        • Solrac Avan

          It seemed to me there was a confusion on that regard in the review, and you were clarifying things about the review, so I just wanted to point that out

    • Eli Valcik

      I like that basketball game they played where they sacrificed the looser. That’s pretty metal.

    • Apple Tree

      this is not something a concrete box should be telling me. welcome to amg

  • Vic279

    I don’t know why but I read their name *Impreza* and now I cant unsee it. Sounds nice tho

    • Monsterth Goatom

      Yes, I’m imprezzed.

      • Vic279

        lol

    • Nukenado

      Cool car.

    • basenjibrian

      I had an STI. Loved it (although my totally uncool, non-aspirational ford Focus ST blows it away in every fun driving way!)

      • Nukenado

        The Focus is a pretty kickass hatchback sports car in its own right. Not as flashy as the Impreza STI and obviously not that sporty but good.

        • basenjibrian

          to be honest, I find it more fun to drive. Ford really nailed the steering and handling. I live in an area near twisty mountain roads (Bay Area/Wine Country), and I find myself avoiding freeways.

          Now…if you are looking for good manners and a comfortable ride…..the ST is not your car! (I understand the RS is even more…severe).

          Engine is…OK. Not as much power or oomph as there should be, and the gas mileage is mediocre at best. But then, I never really liked the engine in the sti, either.

          • Nukenado

            Bah, Fords aren’t known for good gas mileage. That’s what imports are for.

          • basenjibrian

            LOL.
            I have had three imports before the Ford…the Subaru Sti, a VW Golf (which I returned to the dealer because the electrical system self destructed and they never could fix it!) and a 2001 BMW 321i.
            All had about the same MPG rating. Maybe the….problem….is a heavy metal accelerator habit!?

          • Nukenado

            Don’t always put your pedal to the metal.

      • Vic279

        I wish I had a B22 in my garage…

    • Yeah, me too. I’m checking AMG today to see “Impreza” and “Kawior” right next to each other.
      edit: that means “party” and “caviar” in my native language.

      • Vic279

        Polish?

        • Otóż to, proszę Waszmości.

          • Vic279

            Does that mean yes please or what? Google translate doesn’t want to help haha

          • It’s “yes sir” in kind of retro-elegant way. Google couldn’t help with that:)

          • Vic279

            Nice!

  • 12tonehead

    Throw in another virgin for a less muddled production, it’s not only the ill defined guitar… I was expecting some slashing comments about the sound quality here…

  • welyyt

    Their debut was really cool, but this is a step up in every way, and a strong top ten contender for me. It’s just crazy how much great music is coming out on Season of Mist this year.

  • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

    You said you checked three times yet you got the title spelling wrong… It’s “caída” not “caìda”. Sorry to be the Spanish spelling dick, I hope I don’t get banned.

    • GardensTale

      Well shít.

      • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

        Thanks! As a native Spanish speaker seing that diacritical mark pointing the wrong way feels like a poke in the eye! ;)

        • GardensTale

          Would never have guessed you’d speak Spanish!

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            I met some guy named “Luis” in Miami who didn´t speak Spanish. I was surprised almost to the point of rage! How dare you be named “Luis” and not speak Spanish?!

          • herrschobel

            is it the Dudes fault that his parents named him Luis ? And where does that rage come from ? Did this hot blooded rage bring us the Conquistadores and all their Mayhem ? just wondering.

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            Mayhem is Norwegian, they have nothing to do with conquistadores! ;)

          • herrschobel

            lol. clearly i did NOT pay attention in school

          • [not a Dr]

            Visigoths and Ostrogoths were all over Spain at one point, so they may be loosely related after all.

  • Anarchist

    Reminds me a lot of Melechesh. Agree on the guitar definition. If it just stood out a bit more from the mix in places, this would be a fantastic album. As is, I struggle to make out what it’s actually doing in places.

  • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

    Kudos to these guys for having a song as an homage to the late great Paco de Lucia. It wasn’t mentioned in the review but I personally find it worth mentioning, so I just did.

    • Brutalist_Receptacle

      DUDE SHREDDED

      • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

        He sure did!

  • Here’s Johnny

    Never thought flamenco and metal would go together, but these dudes have smashed it. Metal is like tequila it mixes well with anything, then leaves you comatose from the impact.

    • Brutalist_Receptacle

      GRAPE PEDIALYTE?

      • Kurt Kapferer

        Especially grape Pedialyte. But what about breast milk?

        • Here’s Johnny

          I’ve sucked tequila and breast milk from a few aztec ladies, haven’t you?

  • Excellent word slinging, yo. This kind of writing makes me thrilled to be part of this Angry Metal Ka-Tet, and we all say thank ya.

  • One More Thing

    I’ve gotten far more out of the comment section of this review than I had expected. This site is always an interesting place. How will the rest of the day keep pace with what I’ve been given here today, I wonder…

  • Nukenado

    2017 – Make symphonic death great again.
    I’m not kidding, this has been a great year for symphonic death.

  • wayne the devil

    Great review!! I happen to have really enjoyed this album!! Almost irrationally so….like the Squalus album!!! Sharks and Aztecs.!!!!

  • Mach

    No mention of Flametal up in here. Tragic.

    Not really, they kinda suck actually

  • WhamBamSam

    Excuse me sir, do you have a moment to talk about our Jorn and savior? The lead work on the Ark albums, especially the s/t debut, has a decent amount of Spanish flavor to it if you’re on the hunt for that sort of thing.

    As to the record at hand, I’ll have to give it another listen. I vaguely remember hearing a bit of it a week or so ago and dismissing it either due to the production or an over abundance of death metal lately.

  • Thatguy

    Thanks, BR for the history lesson. That was necessary.

    It is also necessary for me to say how cheesy the flamenco guitar is, and how cheesy the harmonic structure is.

    Fuck this music and the spaghetti western it rode in on.

    • GardensTale

      That’s basically a hearty endorsement coming from you!

      • Thatguy

        I know when I’m being patted on the head…

        I don’t hate everything but I have no time for this.

  • Great album. Been listening to it non-stop for the last 2 days.

  • MrAidscancer

    Didn’t mention Nechochwen?

    • GardensTale

      That’s one I never got round to.

      • Thatguy

        Better avoided at all costs.

  • Planex

    Comment section of the year 2017

    • Kurt Kapferer

      Who would have thought that a flamenco/death band would unleash the Brutalist_Recepticle in such new and exciting ways. Eloquent, knowledgeable, and still full of piss. I love it.

  • Mollusc

    I loves Aztecs and Pyramids. And who knew flamenco isn’t named after flamingos? Think the growls are cool on the embedded. Nice review Mr GT, high five.

  • Danny

    I was just listening to Grey Matter Mechanics and thinking that it would be cool if a band weaved that kind of flamenco influence into death metal, so this is definitively a thing I want to check out.

    • Brutalist_Receptacle

      WOOF

      • Danny

        Woof (but about Mexican history)

    • Thatguy

      NO. It’s cheesy and horrible.

      And WOOF.

      • Danny

        But I really woofing like cheese. But I’m less keen on things that are horrible.

  • You wot m8?

    I’m digging this comment section almost as much as I’m digging this record. This is out of the blue, yet quite good.

  • Paul McGuire

    Um…If you didn’t say that they were speaking Spanish I wouldn’t have guessed. Growling all sounds the same to me. I speak fairly solid intermediate Spanish so I would have thought I would have heard it but nope nothing.

  • Moth

    It’s discussions like this, along with the savvy, knowledgeable and snazzily written reviews that keep me coming back…honestly, half the time I feel a bit “meh” about the music (not quite as br00tal as I used to think I was, mea culpa) but I will always be happy that whatever Government agency searches my online history, this site will be pretty much top.

  • Angelus

    Me gusta esta reseña. Buena banda y buena música . Muy bien! Enojado Metal Tipo Reglas!

    Use google translator.

  • Tofu muncher

    Block all, copy, paste the comment section. Done. Great review, btw.

  • Yolo Swaggins

    The music isn’t good enough to have this many comments.

  • Tofu muncher

    3.5/5.0? But does this merit my pausing Samael’s Era One?

  • Digital Violence

    The music is very good but the production is awful and I’m not a fan of the vocalist. This band certainly has potential.

  • Matt slatz

    Band photo ” I told you man…we gotta pack light, when we get off the plane in Cancun it’s gonna be sunny and hot as balls”

  • [not a Dr]

    Since our favorite Historian of Mexico is sticking to his area of expertise…
    “and it fits the Aztec mythology and history like the stones of the Saksaywaman walls”
    Sacsayhuamán happens to be in Peru, near Cuzco. It was built by the Killke and expanded by the “Incas” (Inca is the emperor, the son of the sun, there were forty something of those, one at a time. The work was done by the Quechua and Aymara people who they governed. The advanced architecture is credited to the Tiahuanaco culture).
    Not sure how it would fit the Aztec mythology.
    Disclaimer: besides not being a doctor, I am also not a Historian of Peru. This stuff is taught at elementary school. 32 years ago, I could have recited the names of each of the Incas in chronological order.

    • GardensTale

      Well… Do the Aztecs have walls with perfectly fitting stones somewhere?

      Really I just wanted to make a few people open Google and go “huh, neat”

  • Javier McDrifter

    Found out about this band a few days ago, i never thought i could see flamenco and death metal together for more than an intro or interlude. But this is definitely quite cool