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  • Dr. A.N. Grier

    Poor little deer…

    • Excentric_1307

      Either the worst hunter ever, or the strongest deer ever.

      • Hammersmith

        Why not both?

    • Doomdeathrosh

      “Forgive yourself” by shoving couple flags on an unsuspecting deer….

  • Oscar Albretsen

    So many bands in modern times are trying to “recapture the glory,” or however you want to put it, of 80’s music. There was some decent music then, but I don’t understand why so many bands coming out now are just remaking this stuff that wasn’t really that great back then, 30 years ago. Not to say there aren’t still plenty of original, new bands making music, I just don’t understand why of all the past music that came out, the 80’s seems to the most constant influence on bands nowadays. I mean, the 60’s were better. The 70’s were better, and the 90’s were also better, but when a new band appears wanting to bring back a sound from the past, 9/10 times, that sound is the 80’s.

    • Dr_Fisting

      The ’80s might have been lacking, but they’re way better than what’s going on now.

      • Oscar Albretsen

        Yeah, I won’t argue that.

      • Dr. Scorpion

        Seriously? Gazpacho? Animals as leaders? Ethereal shroud? Toxic Holocaust? Alcest?Baring teeth?Gorguts? Scale the summit? Exivious?Opeth? Monuments?….

        • Dr_Fisting

          Go on Wikipedia and look up “1986 in Metal Albums.” I mean yeah, Alcest is great and all, but come on.
          Also, Opeth’s best work was in the ’90s, sadly.

          • Oscar Albretsen

            Now that I disagree with. Opeth released some great albums in the 90’s (especially “Still Life,” in ’99), but their best was “Blackwater Park,”IMO, which came out in 2001. And their most recent album, “Pale Communion,” was outstanding. AMG named it album of the year last year. Opeth’s best days may not be behind them.

          • Dr_Fisting

            “Blackwater” was 2001? I stand corrected then. “Ghost Reveries” and the new one are also quite good.

          • Handy Donut Hole

            Judas Priest, Iron Maiden and Metallica all released fantastic albums in 1986. I’m with Fisting on this one.

          • Dr_Fisting

            Are you referring to “Turbo”? Sweet baby Jesus…

          • Handy Donut Hole

            Hell yeah. That album still rips.

          • Oscar Albretsen

            Not sure I’d call it a really fantastic album, but there were definitely some killer songs on it. The title track rocks, and “Out in the Cold” was great, too.

          • Dr_Fisting

            I love that we derailed a thread about some post-punk/Isis-sounding band in order to discuss “Turbo.” You guys are awesome.

      • Carlos Marrickvillian

        The 80s was the golden age!

    • Carlos Marrickvillian

      Have to disagree, I would say that the 80’s was an incredibly exciting period in music and and culture generally.
      The 90’s sucked huge amounts of arse, a whole decade that was spoiled by boring sooks like Eddie Vedder, Kurt Cobain and Layne Stanley.
      There were of course bright spots but generally I would say that things are better now than they ever were in the 90s

      • Oscar Albretsen

        90’s were the best decade of music other than the 70’s, thanks to “boring sooks like Eddie Vedder, Kurt Cobain, and Layne Staley.”

        • Oscar Albretsen

          But, probably not really for metal. If you weren’t a fan of grunge (And I was. To this day I like it as much as metal), but anyway, if you weren’t a fan of grunge, I can’t blame you for not liking the 90’s. I just grew up at exactly the right time to make me a gunge fanatic for life.

        • Carlos Marrickvillian

          Nah man the 90’s was the decade that the success of grunge saw the mass buy out and ultimate destruction of independent and alternative music. It took myspace in the 00’s to begin getting music back into the hands of artist and out of the control of warners and sony’s marketing depts

          • Oscar Albretsen

            The biggest bands get signed by the biggest labels. The 90’s changed the “biggest bands” a bit because undrground music was all of a sudden in style, so way more independent bands were signing with big labels. It’s not the labels fault for marketing what sells the best. There was no mass buy out of alternative music.

          • Carlos Marrickvillian

            I guess my opinion is very colloquial. Here in Sydney Australia I started my first band in 90/91 at that time the live music scene of the late 70s and 80s was still going. We would play 2, 3 sometimes more gigs a week to different people in different venues, there were mid week afternoon gigs, you could play late show (2am) gigs, you could play and venues all across the city and suburbs.
            By 95 it was all gone. It became hard to find a gig a month let alone a week. There were barely any venues most of the independent labels had been bought out by the majors and very little interesting music was happening. It was the age of boring Pearl Jam and Nirvana clone bands. People stopped going to gigs because the bands were so tedious.
            It used to be that the most exciting, talented, and dangerous acts got the punters and attention but that all changed in the 90’s. The majors had bought out alternative culture and didn’t know what to do with it … so they fucked it by making alternative culture a “thing”. Not an interesting thing but an easily understandable and unchanging thing that could be marketed “going forward”

            Sure there were some bright and interesting spots in the 90s but in my experience of living through that cursed decade they were the exception not the rule.

          • Oscar Albretsen

            I do have to give you major credit because you have a different viewpoint on the matter, but you present it very politely, so thanks for that. Your opinion certainly makes sense, and it’s too bad that happened to you. I was much younger – 11 in ’91. I hadn’t ever gotten into music before than, but when I first saw Nirvana on MTV it was like a total revelation. The video that had been played before it was “She Drives Me Crazy” by the Fine Young Cannibals (which I actually like now) but at the time, MTV was the only real outlet I knew of to hear new music, and about 95% of what they were playing seemed like campy, commercial pop. Then, all of a sudden, rock music got popular again. I could turn on MTV or the radio and alot of times I’d discover a new band that I’m still a fan of. As the decade went on, there was lots of new stuff that sounded different than anything I’d ever heard, and more than anything I credit my lifelong love of music to being a kid back then.

          • Carlos Marrickvillian

            Cheers I’m trying not to sound like an old fart banging on about the good old days :) I’m actually pretty excited about music at the moment.
            These are good times right now!

          • Oscar Albretsen

            Well I was just a kid through the 90’s, and you were actually taking part in the music scene, so I’m sure you’re more knowledgeable about it than me. I got a bit peeved for a second when you said all those musicians back then were boring, but then I realized, I may like the music, but they were most definitely boring. I was too young to get into music in the 80’s, but if you feel it was a golden age, I’m sure you’re right. Also solves my initial inquiry as to why modern bands are so inclined to recreate the sounds of that decade in their new music.

          • Carlos Marrickvillian

            I was just kid in the 80’s and on the sidelines like you were in the 90s. Maybe I got the rosy coloureds on perhaps saw it for something different.
            I often have this 90’s discussion with people for me it was the era that the cracks in society which had previously been happily ignored were hoovered up, filled in and smoothed over and repackaged as something they never were.
            I was and remain a big fan of “grunge” a term I hate. What I love is honesty in art and outsider rock n roll or metal is a natural shelter for the raw, honest and those free enough to investigate musical expression and escapism. I saw Mudhoney at least a dozen times on their first couple of tours to Australia in 89/90 They were and remain outsiders doing there own thing loudly and with great gusto for the sake of just doing it. I don’t recall anyone calling them grunge they were just the nastiest rock band this cool label Sub Pop had…but they were never successful even at the height of ‘grunge’ even though they were ‘THE’ band that defined that concept and style at the time. They got completely ignored because they weren’t easy to fit into a a marketing program. In my view tho they were a very bright spot! There were others too No Means No, the Gothenburg scene, Steve Albii … and many more
            Boring was a bit harsh but II think it’s ultimately true. As far as mainstream heavy music goes, I’ll take a chest beating Bruce Dickinson / Joan Jett / Brian Johnston / Axle Rose over a crying about bullshit Billy Corgan or Eddie Vedder anyday!
            Good exchange man, hails to you!

      • PanzerFistDominatrix

        ”90s sucked in metal – dafuq…? I could leave it at Pantera and a ’nuff said… :-)

        … but I’m gonna say Iron Maiden, Metallica, Slayer, Sepultura, Testament, Suicidal Tendencies, Megadeth, still ripping shit up.

        Death, Cannibal Corpse, Obituary, Deicide, Malevolent Creation, Monstrosity, all them Florida death metal boys took off in the ’90s.

        The Gothenburg/Swedish death metal scene blew up big time.

        Plus, I do believe there was A Blaze in the Northern Sky when Norwegian black metal stepped it up.

        A matter of taste, of course, but I dare say the ’90s was the bomb diggety for metal fans of most stripes (and I fucking hated grunge).

        • Carlos Marrickvillian

          Man they’re nearly all 80s bands that mostly collapsed in the 90s. I doubt many of those bands you mention will look back fondly on the 90s. Except for Mettalica who made a fortune from commercial radio rock.

          • Oscar Albretsen

            Quite a few influential bands from Gothenburg got going in the 90’s. To name a few: At the Gates, In Flames, Evergrey, Dark Tranquility, Hammerfall, Lost Horizon, Dream Evil, and The Haunted. There was quite a bit going on in the metal scene at that time.

          • PanzerFistDominatrix

            I would look fondly back at the ’90s if I had put out A Vulgar Display of Power/Far Beyond Driven; Rust in Peace/Countdown to Extinction; Tomb of the Mutilated/The Bleeding; Legion/Once Upon the Cross; Arise/Chaos A.D.

            Anyway, to each his own, and I’m loving a lot of the death metal coming out now too.

            Cheers mate, thanks for replying.

    • Wilhelm

      The 80’s (or very late 70’s for some) saw the birth of post punk, death rock, goth, synth pop/new wave, thrash metal, death metal, alternative, AOR, power metal, indie rock, funk rock, industrial, rap, hair rock, electronica, etc… and various hybrids of these styles

      In my opinion the 80’s were the defining decade for music. The 70’s weren’t dark enough and the 90’s, while off to a great start, declined by the middle (although the metal movement was at its strongest ever).

      • Carlos Marrickvillian

        Yep!!

  • sir_c

    Not that the music is specifically bad. Pretty much what the reviewer stated: the band mostly sounds like a bored and tired Beastmilk.

  • AlphaBetaFoxface

    I could dig this if there weren’t so many better examples of post out there

  • Carlos Marrickvillian

    I don’t think you should piss on peoples parades. It’s not nice and a public health issue. Rotten tomatoes in the future please

  • Carlos Marrickvillian

    Who killed Bambi? I really like the album art not sure I really feel like post punk retro at the moment … band name is bit lame.

    • PanzerFistDominatrix

      People in Berlin ask tthe same thing…

      • PanzerFistDominatrix

        Many times…

  • dblbass23

    After listening to the song above…..I like what I hear. I don’t really know why….but I do. I think it would be much better without the spoken part towards the end. A ripping solo in a different key would push the song to better ground. For me anyway.