Dolphin Whisperer

EEEEE EEEEEEEEE, San Jose State University
Ou – one Review

Ou – one Review

“Fuck the rules—that’s the rough translation of OU’s mission statement. Steeped in the streets of the Beijing jazz scene, OU (pronounced “O”) has emerged with a debut that challenges head-on the stagnant energy of the modern prog space. Striking a masterful balance of joviality, tranquility, and ferocity, OU have emerged from the underground to spread their idiosyncratic brand of futureprog.” The future is NOUW, olde man!

Spill Your Guts – The Wrath It Takes Review

Spill Your Guts – The Wrath It Takes Review

“Moving sucks. Fleeing sucks more. That’s the story of Spill Your Guts though, who have, since their inception, churned through 11 members—all expats moving through China for opportunity. However, in their search for a better life they’ve also made the mistake of wanting to be part of the Shanghai hardcore scene, which exists under heavy government scrutiny—artists like Spill Your Guts must truly remain underground to continue. As a young band trying to break through, it can already be daunting hoping that your next gig has an audience—add to that the anxiety of wondering whether your venue will be crashed by local authorities, and it’s a wonder these hardcore hooligans could spit out even one full-length let alone this sophomore outing, The Wrath It Takes.” Crouching hardcore, hidden draGONE.

Tranzat – Ouh La La Review

Tranzat – Ouh La La Review

Tranzat won me over before I even heard a single note, their pétillant persona piquing all the “must listen” bones in my body. On a scale of swell to swole, these proggy French funnymen are decidedly swell-diddly-umptious. Not only have they provided a boy-band-meets-bowling-league cover art for our supreme enjoyment, but also they have adorned their merch page for Ouh La La with silly posters, silly shirts, and reasonable prices. You can even send them your own shirt (or turtleneck or polo) that they will gladly screen print for you. Perhaps for this third outing, Tranzat has finally coordinated with a highly supportive label.” Prep-core.

Boguslaw Balcerak’s Crylord – Human Heredity Review

Boguslaw Balcerak’s Crylord – Human Heredity Review

“Crylord as a word evokes the purest of sadboi feelings—songs of scoured hearts and drowned eyes. Rest assured, Boguslaw Balcerak’s Crylord will do anything for love, but not that. Human Heredity promises nothing more than a good time, despite the band moniker’s sorrowful suggestion. Rather, their light-hearted brand of arena-ready tunes threatens to grease your day with gooey power-infused cheese.” Dairy Malmsteen.

Sartori – Dragon’s Fire Review

Sartori – Dragon’s Fire Review

“Though you’ve probably never heard of Sartori, you’ve definitely heard them before. Sartori neither revels in the murk of dissonant death metal, wallows in the wail of languishing post-metal, nor abstracts musical reality with a blackened avant-garde offering. Instead, in his namesake band, Andy Anderson Sartori uses his scooped six-string powers to provide straightforward, rollicking neoclassical shred, following the tradition of many other Yngwie-inspired shredders (who also dress a little like him).” Shreddy dragon balls.

Verbum – Exhortation to the Impure Review

Verbum – Exhortation to the Impure Review

“What’s in an identity? In a world where often we have knowledge at our fingertips, it’s frustrating when information just isn’t there. Promo material for Verbum has no names attached at all, and though I am a high-level Google-fu practitioner, research into this band doesn’t yield much about members—but we do know they’re from Chile. Therefore, I can only conclude that on one particularly auspicious night deep in the Atacama, an unfortunate miner bored mistakenly into a mysterious, pulsating rock, releasing four cloaked metal demons from the underground.” Unknown and impure.

Temple of Evil – Apolytrosis Review

Temple of Evil – Apolytrosis Review

“Esoteric concepts need some sort of well-endowed platform to rise above obscurity. Temple of Evil believes in the summoning power of their latest sermon Apolytrosis—an ancient Greek term for the concept of redemption through sacrifice. Hailing from the kvlt island nation of Cyprus, in the brutal waters of the Mediterranean Sea, Temple of Evil presents us with the familiar offerings of pummeling blast beats, furious tremolo riffs, and embattled barks—all with the melodic flair of other Hellenistic acts like Rotting Christ or Nightfall.” Small nation, big evil.