Instrumental Metal

Lions’den – Songbird Review

Lions’den – Songbird Review

“Songbird has a lot to answer for even before it begins, what with claimed influences as diverse as Animals as Leaders, Franz Lizst, and… Skrillex. Now before you take to the comments section crying for me to be CALLED TO ICE for even mentioning such a thing here, keep in mind that (1) you could produce a similarly worrying lizst group of artists to circumscribe Igorr, and (2) Madam X told me to review this so if anyone’s getting CALLED TO ICE, it should be my editors.” Angry Bird.

Professor Black – LVPVS Review

Professor Black – LVPVS Review

“Chicago legend Chris Black has liberated himself of labor and label and instead plunged headlong into an endeavor to facilitate all and any of his creative yearnings. Professor Black is the name and, apparently, whatever the fuck he wants is the game. As he is releasing, not one, but three albums simultaneously, it falls to me to quantify LVPVS, an instrumental project of progressive proportions.” Taking back the Black.

Cataya – Firn Review

Cataya – Firn Review

“Music is a visual experience for me, so much so that when I see something instrumental smoldering in the Angry Metal Heap ov Dreams, I grow curious rather than cautious. Such was the case with Cataya’s Firn, and I met its four-track challenge with all kinds of optimism: I ain’t afraid of no vox.” Less talk, more mood.

Spurv – Myra Review

Spurv – Myra Review

“Every successful album, of every genre of music you can imagine, relies on a few key characteristics to make it the monumental album people herald over time. Perhaps it’s the timeliness of the album’s subject matter and how it ties in to what’s going on in the world today. Maybe it’s the originality of the blend of influences a band’s been combining to make something fresh. Most often than not, though, most timeless albums share a single common thread. In other words, the album just flows like an everflowing stream of (insert flow-y liquid/substance here). Norway’s instrumentalists Spurv harness the ability to flow on their third album, Myra.” Faux Mantle, real post-rock.