Peaceville

Autopsy – Skull Grinder Review

Autopsy – Skull Grinder Review

“The holidays are nearly upon us, and your favorite gore fiends are back from the dissection convention with a new EP titled Skull Grinder, perfect for jamming in the stockings alongside the usual yule entrails and raw meat. Apparently intended as a vinyl only release, Skull Grinder offers seven new tracks of raw, sloppy and unhinged American death metal and it’s as endearing and gonzo as ever.” The gift that keeps on grinding.

My Dying Bride – Feel the Misery Review

My Dying Bride – Feel the Misery Review

My Dying Bride is one of those bands that I call a “soundtrack band,” meaning that its music has played a key part in my teenage years as well as my early 20’s. I must have played The Angel and the Dark River so much as a young adult that I’m sure I burned through a couple layers of that CD. “The Cry of Mankind,” to this day, still astounds me whenever I hear it. In other words, My Dying Bride has a special place in my heart.” Journey into the heart of Grymm.

Pentagram – Curious Volume Review

Pentagram – Curious Volume Review

“Apart from Black Sabbath, no doom band can claim the same progenitor status Pentagram can. Coming into existence in 1971, they were the first American doom band and along with their slightly older British brothers in arms, they wrote the book on the entire genre. They also penned another book over the years on how to become the ultimate obscure, underground and kvlt act and stay that way for four fucking decades without ever getting proper recognition.” Last days are not here!

Yer Metal is Olde:  My Dying Bride – The Angel and the Dark River

Yer Metal is Olde: My Dying Bride – The Angel and the Dark River

“Once upon a time in 1995, yours truly, then a long-haired kid with patchy facial hair, baggy cargo pants, and numerous black t-shirts featuring whoever was on Century Media Records at the time, was first getting into doom metal via word-of-mouth and the late, great Metal Maniacs magazine (RIP Katherine Ludwig). One of those bands I was told to check out was England’s gloomy sextet, My Dying Bride.” Doom is its own reward.

Things You Might Have Missed 2014: White Empress – Rise of the Empress

Things You Might Have Missed 2014: White Empress – Rise of the Empress

Twenty-fourteen was a busy one for me, but that’s no excuse for me not covering White Empress‘s début record Rise of the Empress which came out in September from Peaceville Records. It’s hard to know whether or not to call White Empress a super group, per se, but the heart of the band is Paul Allen and Will Graney—previously of Cradle of Filth. From the Empress’ mouth herself, Allen and Graney put together some demo tracks and started working with Mary Zimmer, formerly vocalist for Luna Mortis. This developed slowly, spawning a Bandcamp site and some pretty wicked imagery The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe imagery before the band finally got picked up by Peaceville. Next thing you know and Rise of the Empress was released and I completely biffed on it. Regardless of my schedule or whether or not White Empress qualifies as a “supergroup,” Rise of the Empress is a strong showing that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Things You Might Have Missed 2014: Thine – The Dead City Blueprint

Things You Might Have Missed 2014: Thine – The Dead City Blueprint

“Down here at AMG, we work our asses off to bring forth “similar band” references and genre classifications, define the intentions and directions of an album, and even evaluate the recording/mixing/mastering processes of the release in order to satisfy the insatiable hunger of the AMG hordes.” And we dont always feel appreciated, so give us beer and hugs.

Bloodbath – Grand Morbid Funeral Review

Bloodbath – Grand Morbid Funeral Review

“The death metal super group of all death metal super groups is finally back from the grave after six long years moldering in the soil. Bloodbath needs little introduction, as the preeminent standard bearer of all things retro Swedish death this collective composed of members of Opeth, Katatonia and Witchery once included the likes of Dan Swanö and Mikael Akerfeldt, but both have fled to other pursuits, leaving the band’s new era in the hands of Nick Holmes (Paradise Lost) who now handles vocals.” Can Mr. Holmes shed his rave club past and bring his share of gore to the bathtub?

Autopsy – Tourniquets Hacksaws and Graves Review

Autopsy – Tourniquets Hacksaws and Graves Review

“Well, that cover and the title pretty much say it all. Autopsy is back again rather soon after last year’s The Headless Ritual, and they’re up to their usual sick, crusty, gore-soaked death metal shenanigans. Rocking their old school style of death mixed with doom and horror movies shtick, these shameless fiends show no interest in evolving and if anything, they’re actually devolving further into a grisly stew of sticky unpleasantness. No surprises await the Autopsy fan, just more reliably unhinged sonic mayhem that approximates being on a condemned rollercoaster with zombies, serial killers and hostile ex-girlfriends.” Don the gore-gore boots and join the kickline of the dead, because Autopsy is back to bloody the waters.

Autopsy – The Headless Ritual Review

Autopsy – The Headless Ritual Review

“The Gods of crusty, scabby American death are back yet again! Since their grisly and well-received Macabre Eternal comeback, I’ve been chomping at the bit to hear more new material from the reformed Autopsy. With roots running all the way back to the seminal debut by genre creators Death (Chris Reifert played drums thereon), Autopsy has had an up and down career filled with long lay-offs, breakups and resurrections so it’s always a joy to get a new platter of splatter from them (and I always worry it will be their last).” Since you never know when the wheels will come off the Autopsy table, enjoy their brand of dirty, scuzzy death while you still can! Steel Druhm’s been knee deep in it for a week and has some thoughts (and some infections).

My Dying Bride – The Manuscript Review

My Dying Bride – The Manuscript Review

“You really have to hand it to My Dying Bride. This 23 year old band have stuck to their guns unlike any other band of their kin – not only by staying true to their death-doom roots without much in the way of deviation, but by their sheer amount of unwavering activity. Especially when you consider the other British death-doom pioneers of their ilk, both Anathema and Paradise Lost, going down different paths to musical pastures so far detached from their roots, you’d be forgiven for thinking they’re a completely different band than the gothic pessimists of they began life as. My Dying Bride, however, has had a core sound since their very first album and aside from minor experimentation here and there it’s remained very much the same.” While consistency is the hobogoblin of little minds, it seems to work for these UK doom-mongers. Noctus analyzes if consistency kills or thrills on their new EP.