Rise Above Records

Things You Might Have Missed: Death Penalty – Death Penalty

Things You Might Have Missed: Death Penalty – Death Penalty

“When Cathedral went belly up last year, riff-meister extraordinaire Gaz Jennings was left with some time on his nimble hands. Like any good doom maven he used this time to recruit a new band and launch Death Penalty, which he lovingly named after the debut by classic doomsters Witchfinder General.” If Gaz be playing, you best be paying.

Uncle Acid and The Deadbeats – Mind Control Review

Uncle Acid and The Deadbeats – Mind Control Review

“Occupying the same retro 70s “occult rock” genre as Ghost, Devil, The Devil’s Blood and Occultation, Uncle Acid and The Deadbeats brought a lot of firepower to the retro doom knife fight with their 2011 Blood Lust opus. They showcased the same hooky, memorable song writing chops and appreciation of the past that Ghost featured on their debut, but folded it into a heavier overall sound with big, distorted guitars and a weird serial killer/stalker atmosphere. While I wouldn’t say it bested Opus Eponymous, it was a close second, and way better than the rest of their occult rock ilk.” Can you expect more slamming, jamming doom rock from your creepy Uncle, or did the dreaded Curse of 2013 claim yet another hapless victim.

Cathedral – The Last Spire Review

Cathedral – The Last Spire Review

“So this is the end of the road for Lee Dorrian’s long-running psychedelic doom experiment. Looking back on Cathedral‘s career, they’ve certainly delivered some entertaining, diverse albums while helping make doom cool and interesting again. While I always favored their earlier, less trippy stuff like Forest of Equilibrium and The Ethereal Mirror, their subsequent releases always had something worth investigating. So how does the ringmaster choose to lower the final curtain on his Carnival Bizarre? By returning to the beginning and re-introducing us to the raw, crushing doom that put them on the map in the first place.” Please remove your hats and bow our heads as we mourn the passing of modern doom giants, Cathedral. Steel Druhm will provide the eulogy and you’re all welcome to join us afterward in the graveyard for refreshments.

Moss – Horrible Night Review

Moss – Horrible Night Review

“Even attempting to articulate just how great a band Moss are at what they do is a fool’s errand. Not only is their sound crushing and brooding beyond any band I’ve ever experienced but every new recording they release seems like a blue-moon event that simply cannot be missed. Horrible Night, Moss‘ latest album, was met with an equal amount of excitement to die-hard fans, me among them — anxiously waiting for the follow-up to 2009’s absolutely monolithic Sub Templum, which is one of doom/drone metal’s best releases bar none.” Noctus tells you whether or not it was worth not sleeping or eating for months to get his hands on the very first copy of Horrible Night.

Things You Might Have Missed 2012: Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats – Blood Lust

Things You Might Have Missed 2012: Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats – Blood Lust

Time for all the stuff you might have missed!! Join us as we do our yearly round-up of shit that got overlooked, underrated, misplaced and otherwise blackballed, censored or buried. Steel Druhm kicks off the festivities with a weird one from the weirdly named Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats. Do you like Ghost? How about old style doom? Well then pilgrim, you better read up!

Ghost – Opus Eponymous Review

Ghost – Opus Eponymous Review

How can this be? Yet another metal treasure nearly escaped the watchful eye of Steel Druhm and makes me feel shame for failing to include it in my Top Ten(ish) of 2010. Please forgive this epic oversight as I belatedly introduce you to Opus Eponymous, the debut by Sweden’s Ghost, which is a goldmine of expertly written and played mega-retro 70’s style satanic heavy metal. Taking inspiration from old Mercyful Fate, Witchfinder General, Pentagram and every horror film about satanic cults ever made, Ghost operate in a time warp where metal was as much about mood as sheer musical heaviness and where melody and accessibility were king. Opus Eponymous sometimes feels like the soundtrack to The Exorcist and at other times like Anton LaVey’s satanic mass set to music but it’s compelling, instantly likable and a lot of evil rocking fun for those among us in the left lane of the highway to hell.