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Omniarch – Omniarch Review

Omniarch – Omniarch Review

“Canada boasts a vibrant metal scene, and unsung youngsters Omniarch aim high on their debut, self-titled LP, hoping to carve out their own impression in the vast landscape of the Canadian metal scene. Welding impressive instrumental chops and oodles of exuberant, thrashy energy, Omniarch nail the basics well while cultivating a modern metal amalgam that explores technical, progressive and melodic terrain, with a lively sound that dips into thrash, prog and occasionally blackened, technical, and melodic death waters.” Jacks of all trades.

Then Comes Silence – Machine Review

Then Comes Silence – Machine Review

“For starters, one of the weirder batches of name drops that I’ve ever whipped together: Then Comes Silence sound something like the frolicking gloomchild of The Cure, MGMT, Eurythmics, and Impure Wilhelmina. Machine is a strange thing of bouncing electronica and sullen prog, a 45-minute dance through the tears—or maybe it’s with?” Auto-saboi.

Thy Despair – The Song of Desolation Review

Thy Despair – The Song of Desolation Review

“I’m a sucker for epic-sounding music. From Two Steps from Hell‘s “Heart of Courage” (the main opening theme song of the hilarious TV show Nathan for You) to Yanni‘s scintillating “Nostalgia,” I have a sweet spot for shimmering synths and bombastic orchestral swells. So naturally, when I saw that Thy Despair included a Game of Thrones metal lyrics cover video in their promo materials, I took the bait.” It’s a trap.

Mean Messiah – Divine Technology Review

Mean Messiah – Divine Technology Review

“Drawing directly from the Dev doesn’t really narrow things down in and of itself. Mean Messiah limit themselves to a mixture of Strapping Young Lad and his more life-affirming Transcendence and Epicloud style. It’s a weird dichotomy, manic aggression opposing triumphant zen semi-choirs, causing more whiplash than a bus from a BDSM convention getting rear-ended by an 18-wheeler.” Dev Driver.

Shatter Brain – Pitchfork Justice Review

Shatter Brain – Pitchfork Justice Review

“When I saw the eye-catching cover for Shatter Brain‘s debut full-length, Pitchfork Justice, I immediately assumed they were a thrash band. I was about 1/8th right, as this Australian act mixes sludge, grind, death and punk with speed for what can only be described as an unruly and boisterous sound. Pitchfork Justice is an album that wants to be many things, sometimes all at the same time, and this leads to some interesting moments to be sure.” The mob is revolting.

Elder – Omens Review

Elder – Omens Review

“It didn’t become apparent how little I like Omens until I revisited Elder‘s back catalog. Running through the halls of their ethereal proghalla didn’t just make clear that, next to the sum of Elder‘s previous achievements, Omens isn’t great; it cemented that Omens isn’t good.” Disrespecting the Elder.

Ocean Chief – Den Tredje Dagen Review

Ocean Chief – Den Tredje Dagen Review

“Doom is a tricky genre to get right. At least in my opinion. It has a fine line to walk, trading in tectonic riffs, bleak atmospherics and roared vocals, often at glacial speeds, it  risks sacrificing memorability on the altar of heaviness.  Swedish quartet Ocean Chief have done their time and paid their dues, however, and should be well equipped to avoid this pitfall.” Riff rafts.

Cemetery Filth – Dominion Review

Cemetery Filth – Dominion Review

“For such an iconic band, there aren’t many modern groups that sound very much like Death. Sure, Gruesome‘s whole schtick is sounding like them and Skeletal Remains have a hearty Death influence, but compared to the legions of bands that mimic Entombed or Incantation, Chuck Schuldiner’s brainchild seems underrepresented. After Live Burial answered the call earlier this month, Atlanta’s Cemetery Filth are here with their Dominion debut to profess their own love of Schuldiner’s work.” I am become Death.