Ævangelist

Antediluvian – The Divine Punishment Review

Antediluvian – The Divine Punishment Review

Antediluvian has always been a strange beast. Although undoubtedly akin to the aforementioned hordes of black/death density-meisters, these Oilers have always been slickly produced and solidly written. While acts like Grave Upheaval and Altarage are lost at murk in swaths of ambiance and distortion, Antediluvian prioritizes a strong tether of percussion to guide it.” You can’t punish the willing.

Acausal Intrusion – Nulitas Review

Acausal Intrusion – Nulitas Review

“If I’m being truly honest, I have a difficult time with death metal. It feels unfair, as these acts rear their guttural heads on my AOTY’s yearly, but they’re often adjacent strains: black/death, dissonant tech-death, Lovecraftian, or other pretentiously experimental concoctions. But old school and Swedeath? Gimme somethin’ else, because I overthink the hell out of it: at the risk of sounding like my parents, it all sounds the same to me. However, a new weird death metal release from the label behind groups like Prometheus and ThecodontionAcausal Intrusion, sign me the fuck up.” Ruptured Nulitas.

Plasmodium – Towers of Silence Review

Plasmodium – Towers of Silence Review

Plasmodium is described by Metal Archives as “psychedelic black/death metal,” and that is definitely appropriate. Formed in 2016, the Melbourne, Australia, sextet features veteran blood, particularly drummer Matt “Skitz” Sanders of Damaged fame, and Aretstikapha of Mazikeen. Releasing Entheognosis in 2016 to underground interest, it introduced this highly atmospheric breed that doesn’t quite land in death metal or black metal, but somehow fills the dead air between. Featuring blackened vocals and drumming, sophomore effort Towers of Silence features some of the strangest soundscapes of 2021 thanks to its deranged string attack and cosmic ambiance.” Enjoy for silence.

Ophe – Litteras Ad Tristia Maestrum Solitude Review

Ophe – Litteras Ad Tristia Maestrum Solitude Review

“It’s a big deal when a band lists major influences, like Ævangelist, Dodecahedron, and Blut Aus Nord, in their biography. Sometimes it’s an innocent list, meant to feed the reader with keywords. Other times, it’s misleading. In Ophe‘s case, the list ain’t that far off, as the band takes their forefather’s black/avant-garde style and French’s the fuck out of it. It’s Dodecahedron‘s low-end, mixed with the dark, distant blackness of Ævangelist and layers of Område and Spektr. When you look deeper into Ophe, this isn’t a surprise. Considering that this one-man band consists of Område‘s own Bargnatt XIX. But this ain’t no Område.” One, man, one basement.

Blut Aus Nord/AEvangelist – Codex Obscura Nomina [split] Review

Blut Aus Nord/AEvangelist – Codex Obscura Nomina [split] Review

“Ever since the release of 2003’s The Work Which Transforms God, French black metal pioneers Blut Aus Nord took the constrictions of the standard black metal envelope, stretched them out to ridiculous lengths and dimensions, and repackaged them to the point where you only vaguely remember there being an envelope in front of you. In other words, they, along with fellow Frenchmen Deathspell Omega, redefined black metal as we know it.” And here we have a split with a band they influenced mightily. Master and Apprentice if you will.

Kommandant – The Architects of Extermination Review

Kommandant – The Architects of Extermination Review

“Hailing from Chicago and proclaiming to be the purveyors of “martial black metal,” Kommandant don their Sunday best (consisting of black dress shirts and gas masks), raise banners and wind-torn blackened flags of time-honored propaganda, and set the rhythmic march to the local courthouse. Good thing I’m in no short supply of black button-ups.” Gas masks are very versatile from a fashion perspective.