Atheist

Coexistence – Collateral Dimension Review

Coexistence – Collateral Dimension Review

“Technical death metal can be a fickle mistress. She can lure you away with promises of sublime virtuosity, only to bombard you with a cacophony of disjoined solos. She can entice you with the siren song of a bold sci-fi concept album, only to present you with a sub-standard Spawn of Possession clone. Despite this, there’s a lot of great tech death out there, but you have to be willing to separate the 8-string wheat from the 7-string chaff. So where does Coexistence fit in with their debut album Collateral Dimension?” All tech, no peace.

Cryptic Shift – Visitations from Enceladus Review

Cryptic Shift – Visitations from Enceladus Review

“While I’ve traditionally identified as a basic black metal bitch, my listening habits of late have hovered firmly above death metal territory. The art of the Big Dumb Riff has held absolute command of my Spotify search bar, and it’s all thanks to the diversity the genre pool has spawned in over three decades of evolution. Just as I finish my most recent round of dick flattening at the hands of something as unflinchingly savage as Black Curse, I know I can hop to the opposite end of the technical axis to enjoy similarly aggressive highs in a fresh context. Cryptic Shift‘s debut is about as far from something like Black Curse as you can imagine on the caveman riff spectrum, but those same thrills are all here.” Up Shift’s creek.

Lantern – Dimensions Review

Lantern – Dimensions Review

“This review is obscenely late. Mostly because I’m trying to complete a PhD and not contract terminal stupidity from my Government. I’ve also been increasingly distracted by death metal’s performance this year. Without doubt, the genre’s legion of revenant revengers have clawed through the rot of 2020 and thrust a flayed face to the light. Lantern, who shone so pallid and putrid in 2017, are of particular note.” Late to the early grave.

Hemotoxin – Restructure the Molded Mind Review

Hemotoxin – Restructure the Molded Mind Review

“In 2016 I reviewed the sophomore album by California’s Hemotoxin, entitled Biological Enslavement. It was a not-unwelcome slice of death-thrash with an eye for the old-school and a proclivity for the technical, though it suffered from indistinct song-writing. Almost 4 years later in 2020, its successor called Restructure the Molded Mind is set for release. 2020 has thus far proven to be a pretty shitty time to be alive but perhaps some raucous death-thrash was exactly what I needed to reinvigorate myself.” Blood poisoning and mind molding.

Nocturnus AD – Paradox Review

Nocturnus AD – Paradox Review

“There are few scenes that have been as instrumental in expanding metal’s horizon as Florida’s death metal explosion. Toiling towards the top of the totem has always been Nocturnus. Their debut album The Key will irrevocably remain a personal favorite and one of the genre’s canonical greats. Thanks to the incessant efforts of drummer and vocalist Mike Browning (of early Morbid Angel fame), the band has endured a tumultuous rebirth as Nocturnus AD. But can new album Paradox survive the curse of contentious re-branding and do justice to the band’s own lofty genesis?” The key to death metal’s past.

Gomorrah – Gomorrah Review

Gomorrah – Gomorrah Review

“Confession time: I am not the biggest fan of technical death metal. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the classics, such as Death and Atheist, as well as choice cuts from Cynic. But the genre as a whole suffers from either too many scale acrobatics, or way too much chugging on the low string on a 7-, 8-, or even 9-string guitar to even warrant such a overly abused tag such as “technical.” In other words, technical metal bores me to tears most of the time. You know what doesn’t bore me, though? Canada’s Gomorrah.” Smile back at this death.

Contrarian – Their Worm Never Dies Review

Contrarian – Their Worm Never Dies Review

“Dear readers, what are your favorite ’90s progressive or technical death metal albums? Perhaps it’s Cynic‘s legendary Focus, Death‘s Human, Edge of Sanity‘s Crimson, or is it Pestilence and their classic Consuming Impulse opus? Or maybe Atheist‘s brilliant Unquestionable Presence album floats your boat. Or digging deeper, a more left-field choice: Martyr‘s underrated Hopeless Hopes. New York’s Contrarian pay omage to the classic ’90s progressive and technical death scene through their retro and impressively authentic throwback style of spazzed out prog death on their third LP, Their Worm Never Dies.” Undying worms and olde death.

Second to Sun – The Walk Review

Second to Sun – The Walk Review

Second to Sun hails from St. Petersburg, Russia and plays slick atmospheric black/death with a touch of thrash tickling the edges. But, before that, they played djent… Though you aren’t allowed to talk about that because the band doesn’t acknowledge Based on a True Story (or their ‘debut’ record, Gal agnostiske drømmer) as being a part of the band’s official discography. Instead, it all began with 2015’s The First Chapter. And though a transition from djent to wicked, unsettlingly melodic black metal (with clear headbangable moments) is odd, the strangest part about The Final Chapter is that it’s an instrumental album… I know what you’re thinking: shit’s getting weird.” Walk on home, boy.

Horrendous – Idol Review

Horrendous – Idol Review

“So where does Horrendous go from here? And where do I go after recklessly hurling superlatives over their past two albums with the salivating enthusiasm of a heavy set man at a hot dog eating contest. One thing’s certain, expectations from the band’s bloated fan-base will be sky high after the three-year wait following Anareta.” Worship at this Horrendous Idol.