Bell Witch

Deafkids – Metaprogramação Review

Deafkids – Metaprogramação Review

“As one of the resident “I like weird music” suckers in the AMG offices, it fell to me this month to take on the latest from Brazilian noisemakers Deafkids: their third album, the copy-and-paste titled Metaprogramação. These fellows create a bizarre fusion of noise rock, punk, and Brazilian polyrhythms, leaving us with something that is both disturbing and hypnotizing at the same time. Newly signed to the Neurosis label Neurot Recordings, and actually supporting (along with Bell Witch) Neurosis for their upcoming brief North American summer tour, all signs are pointing up for Deafkids. Now, how to go about reviewing something that Steve Von Till describes as “sonic Ayahuasca?”” Kids today.

Onirophagus – Endarkenment (Illumination Though Putrefaction) Review

Onirophagus – Endarkenment (Illumination Though Putrefaction) Review

“Think of an album as a multi-course meal; many of them give bite-sized but satisfying nutrient-packed portions that not only leave you satisfied, but definitely give you a craving for more. However, a scant few offer just meager tastes of what’s to come, oftentimes leaving the listener malnourished and starving, begging for just another bite. Finally, some bands give you monstrous servings, packed with calories, nutrients, and sometimes things you don’t want to ingest under any circumstances whatsoever, stuffing you full as you’re screaming, “No, please stop… I can’t eat anymore… I’m gonna explode…” and then they keep feeding you well past the point of explosion.” It’s waffer thin!

CHRCH – Light Will Consume Us All Review

CHRCH – Light Will Consume Us All Review

“Anything that comes out on Neurosis’ home label, Neurot Recordings, is sure to be drenched in minimalist atmosphere and performed with impeccable skill. After seeing critical success with 2015’s debut Unanswered Hymns, as well as this year’s split with Fister, Sacramento’s CHRCH are set to lay claim to the mantle of heaviest all-caps doom band with the release of sophomore effort Light Will Consume Us All. Being one of the few AMGers who is into long, drawn-out doom extravaganzas, I laid claim to the album immediately, and have cranked it for a month now — because when songs are ten to twenty minutes long, you need a lot of time to dig into them.” Missing vowels and busting bowels.

Shrine of the Serpent – Entropic Disillusion Review

Shrine of the Serpent – Entropic Disillusion Review

“I don’t know what it is with the water in Portland, Oregon lately that’s causing this recent influx of heady, destructive doom/death metal. With Bell Witch dropping an almost-90-minute megaton bomb in Mirror Reaper last year, Portland is starting to become the city where all things slow and guttural go to blossom into incredible, epic-length cascades of the downtrodden. Throwing their hats into that collective summoning circle is upstarts Shrine of the Serpent.” Dirges over Portlandia.

Mad God – Tales of a Sightless City [Things You Might Have Missed 2017]

Mad God – Tales of a Sightless City [Things You Might Have Missed 2017]

“Due to either time constraints, tight deadlines, or this wonderful thing we all call life, I do miss an album or two to review in time. South Africa’s Mad God make a worthy addition to the year’s crop of doom with their self-released debut, Tales of a Sightless City.” God is mad, look sorry.

Yhdarl – Loss Review

Yhdarl – Loss Review

“Pulling off a long song — be it a ten-minute black metal piece or an hour-plus funeral doom opus — takes very deliberate pacing. Great drone and doom bands know this and know how to pull the listener rather than push them. If the song moves too fast, it can seem to lose structure, but if it moves too slowly, it can stagnate and sour the listener to its next idea. One has to have the pacing and space to keep themselves involved.” The long lurch into oblivion.

Over The Voids – Over The Voids Review

Over The Voids – Over The Voids Review

“In my stint with Angry Metal Guy, I’ve encountered not one, but two overly congested forms of black metal. I’ve either encountered black metal that goes beyond its initial consume-by date, or I’ve been bombarded by one-man basement metal, with the latter only impressing me here and there. So when I get a 4-song, 34-minute album with two of the songs dipping below the 7-minute mark, let’s just say the hairs on my neck and back shoot up straighter than those on Don King’s head.” Basement king or cellar fail?