Carpathian Forest

Svarttjern – Shame Is Just a Word Review

Svarttjern – Shame Is Just a Word Review

“The moon is full, the candles in my bedroom are flickering, and the neighborhood feels like it’s burning to the ground. The sirens scream up and down the street, the homeless behind the dumpster are cursing at each other, and the drug dealers in next door’s complex are firing warning shots into the air. My bartending friends say the place is overcome by angry, aggressive creeps. And my colleagues at the psychiatric ward say the patients are howling at the moon. It’s like a re-imagining of Carrie, minus everyone’s favorite whipping boygirl. Yet, it’s a perfect night for the chaos that pours from my speakers.” Blackness in the night.

Stellar Master Elite – Hologram Temple Review

Stellar Master Elite – Hologram Temple Review

“Though everything SME has released is solid, III brought with it a new vocalist and direction. Building atmospheres now reign supreme over the band’s early days of traditional black metal. The result, as I mentioned in my III review, was something spontaneous, borrowing from a variety of black and death metal influences. Though III concluded the trilogy, there’s still loads of fun to be had on Hologram Temple.” Diversity stings.

Hedonihil – I Review

Hedonihil – I Review

“Expectations are precarious things. The older we get, the more we assume they will go unmet. This almost religiously applies to super groups. When I came across Finland’s Hedonihil, a death metal project comprised of members of Swallow the Sun, I expected great things. But when I delved into the press materials (always foolish) and saw them described as anti-poetry, I expected substantially less great things.” Angry pretense.

Grave Violator – Back to the Cult Review

Grave Violator – Back to the Cult Review

“Does anyone remember Nattefrost and Carpathian Forest? Not that they’ve fallen from the face of the Earth but neither band has released a full-length album in thirteen fucking years. So, I wouldn’t blame you for moving on to other filthy, leather-clad black metal outfits. Hell, even most of the original members of Carpathian Forest got tired of waiting around for another release—instead branching off to a variety of other musical outlets. But, for all the hate, filth, satanism, and unholy loads of Nattefrost piss, puke, and jizz, these two bands hold a warm, throbbing spot in my heart. But, lo and behold, there is a young band with the same kind of perverted mindset.” Sticky.

Imha Tarikat – Kara Ihlas Review

Imha Tarikat – Kara Ihlas Review

“The dichotomy of black metal is that despite pockets of cell-division spawning mutations of various strains, the genre prefers to spurn innovation and maintain its core of anti-religious suppurations. For every Solefald, Patria, or Ihsahn out there pushing black metal out from its comfort zone, there are legions of corpse paint-bedecked bands stoking the fires of tradition with coals of unimaginative blast-beats and stale iconoclasm. I love black metal, but that love tends to seek out bands who demonstrate innovation rather than those who peddle another tired take on Under a Funeral Moon. I crave something different and that thirst has lead me to Kara Ihlas.” Different god, same blackness.

Demonomancy – Poisoned Atonement Review

Demonomancy – Poisoned Atonement Review

“Back in 2016, Italy’s ghoulish Demonomancy released a split EP with Finland’s Witchcraft that was one of the first releases that I tackled as a scribe for the site. While the split didn’t have me feting either act I still wrangled a fair measure of enjoyment out of it, enough at least to warrant a closer look at Demonomancy’s new album, Poisoned Atonement.” Vote Hell.

Provocator – Satan, Chaos, Blood and Terror Review

Provocator – Satan, Chaos, Blood and Terror Review

“Now, this is a weird one for Doc Grier. Back in 2014, I had the pleasure of reviewing Provocator‘s debut record, Antikristus. At the time, this one-man, black metal outfit from Slovenia sought the rhythms and execution of Norway’s ’90s scene. The approach was raw—but not too raw—and the delivery was somewhere between the aggressiveness of Gorgoroth, the minimalism of Darkthrone, and the “upbeatness” of Nattefrost/Carpathian Forest. And, after all these years, the record still has staying power for me. What’s so weird about this? What’s weird is that Antikristus was Doc Grier‘s very first review with AMG. So, as you can guess, I couldn’t pass up Hellscream’s follow-up full-length, Satan, Chaos, Blood and Terror.” So much Satan.

The 3rd Attempt – Egocidal Path Review

The 3rd Attempt – Egocidal Path Review

“While another release from The 3rd Attempt wouldn’t get so much as a shrug from most metalheads, I’ve been fucking waiting all year for Egocidal Path. As anyone might be able to tell from reading 2015’s Born in Thorns review, I love anything Tchort gets his hands on. Be it Carpathian Forest, Green Carnation, or Blood Red Throne, I’m there. And being that the debut was a solid release of Nattefrost and Carpathian Forest-inspired black ‘n’ roll, I can’t help but get excited about the follow-up.”

Taake – Kong Vinter Review

Taake – Kong Vinter Review

“But the ones I came back to the most were the underrated groups, like Ofermod, Svartsyn, Urgehal, and Taake. To me, this latter group has some of the best black metal ever recorded. In Taake‘s case, Nattestid ser porten vid, Over Bjoergvin graater himmerik, and Hordalands doedskvad still make me dribble over my lower lip like a fucking vegetable. But, like most black metal giants, Taake‘s recent material has begun to slip in quality. Their 2014 release, Stridens hus, left my throat parched and now my need for nourishment is at an all-time high. The question is: will Taake‘s newest release, Kong Vinter, wet lips or will it cause them to crack and bleed?” Lip care is crucial in a frostbitten kingdom of ice.