Crust

Crawl – Altar of Disgust Review

Crawl – Altar of Disgust Review

Crawl, to put it simply, sounds pissed off. Not one to fuck with, Crawl’s sound hearkens to those HM-2 legends we all know very well (Entombed, Dismember), but filtered through the punky swagger and unlimited ire of acts like Goregäng and Vomitheist. Knowing all three of those things—HM-2 pedals, Goregäng, and Vomitheist—found a warm bed in the death mansion that is the prolific Transcending Obscurity Records, most of our readership automatically know what to expect from Altars of Disgust.” HM-2 and YOU.

Dödsrit – Nocturnal Will Review

Dödsrit – Nocturnal Will Review

“It’s not like I really need any convincing, but it’s great when an album comes along and reminds me that black metal is, in fact, fucking fantastic. 2023 was a comparatively dry year for the genre, especially as far as the more straightforward, unadorned variety was concerned. 2024 is already making up for it. Swedish/Dutch four-piece Dödsrit are one of the voices in the scene quietly but confidently proving how effective some no-frills (crust-adjacent) melodic black metal can be.” Black is the olde black.

Systemik Viølence – Negative Mangel Attitude Review

Systemik Viølence – Negative Mangel Attitude Review

“Punk and metal have a complicated relationship, or at least we treat them like they do. As fans, we like to be something—a metalhead, a punk, a dissobro. As music seekers, we like to have genre guides—punk-born tags like crust, mathcore, grindcore, metal-born tags like doom, death, black, kissing cousins like sludge, thrash, deathcore. And the bands we value tend to play to or play with these expectations. Others eschew the norms of where they’re placed or even fight the idea of being the guitar music we’ve all come to love—but not Systemik Viølence. These Portuguese knuckleheads just wanna play screeching chords, overdriven bass, and venomous vocal lashings loud, fast, and loud.” Feel the wiølence.

Industrial Puke – Born into the Twisting Rope Review

Industrial Puke – Born into the Twisting Rope Review

“Hardcore sometimes gets a bad wrap in metal circles, however, there is no doubting the potential for hardcore and metal to join forces in ways that transcend the often-maligned metalcore tag. Industrial Puke is a newish act straight outta Sweden, but don’t let that fool you, dear listener, this is an experienced outfit featuring members of Burst, Obstruktion and Rentokiller.” Clean up in aisle all.

Dryad – The Abyssal Plain Review

Dryad – The Abyssal Plain Review

“When one considers the state of Iowa, one is unlikely to think of black metal. Be-masked hard rock radio metal? Yes. Black metal, no. Likewise, Iowa conjures images of corn fields, wind turbines, college football Saturdays and James Tiberius Kirk. But the ocean? Not unless you’re a paleontologist. You see, the verdant rolling hills of all those Grant Wood paintings were once covered by an enormous prehistoric inland sea. As a result, the place is absolutely lousy with fossils of trilobites and giant sea scorpions. I wonder if this was at least part of the inspiration for Iowa City, Iowa’s very own crusty black metal quartet Dryad as they were writing their debut full-length, the marine-themed The Abyssal Plain.” Flyover seas.

Encryptment – Dödens Födsel Review

Encryptment – Dödens Födsel Review

“Along comes Stockholm’s Encryptment with debut Dödens Födsel, a title that translates from their native Swedish as… wait, give me a second with Google Translate… my goodness! “Dead Fetus.” That’s grisly, but fair enough–the Kingdom of Metal is a tough place to be an angel or a fetus. Dödens Födsel was a random pluck from the Promo Sump, and I half-hoped to let it go neglected in the crush of list season and day-job deadlines. Then I pressed “play,” and the album assaulted me with a half-hour of crusty, blackened death vitriol.” Womb raider.

Stomachal Corrosion – Stomachal Corrosion Review

Stomachal Corrosion – Stomachal Corrosion Review

“As one begins to explore metal more and more deeply, one comes to the realization that there are certain ‘legendary’ albums that seem to be appreciated more for being innovative than actually being good. I would argue, for example, that Napalm Death’s Scum is a pretty mediocre album overall and was far surpassed by the material that followed it, even if it remains a critical piece of extreme metal’s history. This becomes a problem when bands create new releases similar in style to these ‘innovative but not very good’ albums, resulting in records that are neither innovative nor good. But maybe Stomachal Corrosion could escape this fate” Tummy trouble.