Death Doom

Altered Dead – Returned to Life Review

Altered Dead – Returned to Life Review

“After the overwhelmingly putrid scent of sweet death delighted the senses of genre enthusiasts in 2020, can death metal in 2021 piggyback off the momentum of a banner year for the genre and keep the brutality rolling in 2021 with similar levels of quality? Canada’s Altered Dead throw their bones in the ring of death on the follow-up to their self-titled debut from back in 2016.” Reanimatdead.

Shattered Hope – Vespers Review

Shattered Hope – Vespers Review

“Like raw black metal, funeral doom operates at the extremely thin edge of an extremely niche wedge. Long, patient, languid tracks put many to sleep with their glacial pace. But glaciers carry enormous momentum as a result of their sheer mass. For those who appreciate it, funeral doom provides an unparalleled — and often profound — journey through grief and sorrow. Greece’s Shattered Hope offer their third attempt at this tricky genre with Vespers.” Sad scooters.

Void Rot – Descending Pillars Review

Void Rot – Descending Pillars Review

“Upon entering the kitchen the camera pans to a large, oily hole in reality. You can see time/space bend and slip at the edges. Jonathan and the woman stare into the nothingness and grow pale. A spackle knife is slowly being pulled into the vortex center, languidly circling between worlds. Jonathan turns to the woman. ‘You’ve got Void Rot.'” Pillars of the community.

Beast of Revelation – The Ancient Ritual of Death Review

Beast of Revelation – The Ancient Ritual of Death Review

Beast of Revelation involves Bob Bagchus, one of my favorite metal drummers and a foundational member of Asphyx. Bagchus knows what he likes, and conveniently I tend to like that stuff too. Also included are AJ van Drenth who handles guitar and bass, and Incantation’s John McEntee on vocals. Unsurprisingly, I’m reminded of Asphyx and its related side project Grand Supreme Blood Court, mixed with Incantation’s “comeback” era.” Death in the family.

Vultur – Drowned in Gangrenous Blood Review

Vultur – Drowned in Gangrenous Blood Review

“The overflowing embarrassment of death metal riches of 2018 was always going to be tough to follow when 2019 rolled around. Not that the year has been lacking in quality death metal, but for the most part the genre hasn’t blown me away. Perhaps an unheralded act is capable of stealing the show as the year winds down. Enter Greece’s Vultur, set to unleash their sophomore album, Drowned in Gangrenous Blood.” Blood drunk.

The Drowning – The Radiant Dark Review and Album Premiere

The Drowning – The Radiant Dark Review and Album Premiere

“Since we got ourselves into the whole album premiere business not too long ago, I wondered what kind of album it would take to warrant a premiere of my own. Shockingly, I didn’t have to wait very long. Thanks to a certain Muppety influence, I acquired was deemed just barely worthy of access to a monumental death-doom album that very quickly rose to the top of my year-end contenders list. Imagine my sadistic ecstasy as I rushed to resuscitate The Drowning from the promo pool, only to discover that one sparkly sponge absorbed the Assign To bubble weeks beforehand. Joy Accordia! I’ll not be forgiven for this, not for an eternity.” Drinking deeply of despair.

Byzanthian Neckbeard – Minaton Review

Byzanthian Neckbeard – Minaton Review

“Hailing from the bovine infested English Channel island of Guernsey, Byzanthian Neckbeard combine sludgy stoner metal with old school-minded death doom. Yes, these styles come from very different places and mindsets, but the rather large overlap on this Venn Diagram of Doom is labeled “big riff energy.”” Big, neckbeards mean big riffs (and cows).

Profetus – The Sadness of Time Passing Review

Profetus – The Sadness of Time Passing Review

“From the first minutes, it will be obvious to followers of the style that Profetus model their slow trudging misery after funeral forefathers Thergothon and Skepticism. This makes sense, as all three bands hail from Finland, home of the world’s most metal bands per capita at two bands per person.” Remembrance of heavy things past.