Demigod

Tomb Mold – Manor of Infinite Forms Review

Tomb Mold – Manor of Infinite Forms Review

“Life can often be confusing, gross and unnecessarily sticky. Three words one might use to describe Canada’s Tomb Mold, who, after tearing classic death metal asunder with 2017’s debut, Primordial Malignity, have since returned with an expanded line-up and another installation of their corporal jigsore quandry. Manor of Infinite Forms arrives rancid, raucous and ready to rot.” Rotting in the free world.

Gorephilia – Severed Monolith Review

Gorephilia – Severed Monolith Review

“Gorephilia. Just the word, let alone the cover, should clue you in as to what genre this release belongs to. Like most people, it’s not a term that often finds itself in my daily vocabulary, heard only by local restaurant staff when instructing them as to how to cook my fucking cow. Turns out in Finland it means grim, Morbid Angel worshiping death metal.” Gore is hell. [Gorephilia. What else can we really add to that one? Rich man, gore man, Incantation man, die!]

Ekpyrosis – Asphyxiating Devotion Review

Ekpyrosis – Asphyxiating Devotion Review

“The stoics believed in ekpyrosis, the yearly destruction of the universe by an all-consuming inferno. They believed that life is a cycle of destruction and rebirth. Recreation out of chaos. Ekpyrosis embody ekpyrosis through their fiery homage to old-school death metal and Asphyxiating Devotion is the unrelenting debut record by this Italian four-piece.” Burning the way to rebirth!

Corpsessed – Abysmal Thresholds Review

Corpsessed – Abysmal Thresholds Review

“Steel Druhm loves his old school death metal, but I get tired of comparing every band’s sound to Entombed, Dismember and/or Grave. Thankfully, Corpsessed arrived in my queue with a terrific moniker and a sound that doesn’t require the standard comparisons. That’s because these sick Finnish death mongers deliver a crusty, ugly style that sounds like a mix of Demigod, Onward to Golgotha era Incantation, Autopsy, primitive low-fi blackness and sludgy doom.” They say nothing cleans the palate like sewage spewing death metal. Well then, take a big slurp of this nastiness.

Behemoth – The Satanist Review

Behemoth – The Satanist Review

There is no way to dodge the issue, expectations for The Satanist are sky high. It’s easy to understand how that could be. Behemoth‘s most recent release was in 2009 but felt overwrought and flat; it had the form but little substance and the sound was loud but fatigued. Nearly 5 years later, Anno Domine 2014, Nergal has been through a bout with cancer and a fight with the Polish legal system. The narrative arising is simple. Indeed, it’s low hanging fruit: the best art arises from adversity. The long wait — 4.5 years between records is almost unheard of for a band on Behemoth‘s level — has set the stage for what has the makings of a rebirth of sorts for Poland’s best-known extreme metal act. The Satanist can set the stage for a new era in Behemoth‘s storied career and, as one would expect, the attention of the metal world is firmly fixed on it.