Indian Metal

Gutslit – Amputheatre Review

Gutslit – Amputheatre Review

“You don’t have to be a metal genius to make an accurate assumption about the genre affiliation of India’s Gutslit. Although it would make a nice surprise, Gutslit isn’t a group of prog metal hipsters or power metal warrior nerds. No folks, Gutslit, as expected, play brutal death bolstered by a smattering of grind. But unlike many run-of-the-mill bands that favor guttural extremity over actual craftsmanship and decent songwriting, Gutslit rise above the pack with their impressively written and refined second LP, Amputheatre.” Sometimes guts are enough.

Chaos – All Against All Review

Chaos – All Against All Review

“I enjoy discovering metal bands from the different corners of the world, beyond the usual hot spots, often leading to exotic and tasty finds. However, for no particular reason, the Indian metal scene has remained largely a mystery to me. Last year, unheralded Indian band Kryptos released the ragingly impressive Burn up the Night, certainly making a big enough impression to alert me to the potentially hidden wonders of the wider Indian metal scene.” Crouching thrasher, hidden bullet belt.

Plague Throat – The Human Paradox Review

Plague Throat – The Human Paradox Review

“There’s something to be said about truth in advertising, a mythical beast that promises the end-product bears some resemblance to the picture on the box. From Death to Obituary to Autopsy, few genres carry the torch with such ardent fervour than death metal, a genus devoted to announcing with a bullhorn its intentions to all and sundry. With a name like Plague Throat — other body part-related titles workshopped but rejected were “Funny Bone” and “Tennis Elbow” — this Indian trio is signaling loud and clear the type of music one can expect to find on their debut, The Human Paradox.” Perturbed Toenail could have worked too.

Grossty – Crocopter Review

Grossty – Crocopter Review

“My comrades may disagree, but I find the forced exploration inherent in reviewing to be a feature, not a bug. Operating outside of the norm drew me to metal in the first place, so I embrace this newfound stream of eclectic tastes and unexpected origin. Debutantes Grossty are the latest enigma I find rapping at my door. One of the only bands grinding in India today, they offer escape from the trappings of a metal culture that, though born of difference, too often trends toward uniformity.” Tasting the world, one promo at a time.

Kryptos – Burn up the Night Review

Kryptos – Burn up the Night Review

“When I think of India, a few things come to mind: curry, sacred cows, and the terrific 2001 novel Life of Pi. I certainly don’t think of heavy metal, much less fiery 80s-inspired metal with a deliciously modern twist. Enter Kryptos. Formed in 1998, this quartet has showboated their love of classic Judas Priest and Iron Maiden through 3 prior full-lengths, in addition to opening for acts like Death Angel and becoming the first Indian metal band to tour Europe in 2010.” Fist of the old star!

Demonstealer – This Burden Is Mine Review

Demonstealer – This Burden Is Mine Review

“In my almost three years of reviewing for AngryMetalGuy.com, very few things surprise me anymore. Yet, while doing research for This Burden Is Mine, the second album by Indian one-man project Demonstealer, I hopped onto their Facebook page, and realized just how prolific one Sahil Makhija, aka The Demonstealer, is. Not only is he the guitarist and vocalist on here (as well as in his main band, Demonic Resurrection), but he also runs his own eponymous record label (which is also India’s first extreme metal label). He also has his own online cooking blog. In fact, the first thing I saw on Facebook was was a link to a YouTube video for making bacon cake. I didn’t know such a concoction of magnificence even existed on this lowly plane, proving that magic does indeed manifest on Earth.” Bacon cake impresses even the jaded staff of AMG.

Tetragrammacide – Typhonian Wormholes: Indecipherable Antistructural Formulae Review

Tetragrammacide – Typhonian Wormholes: Indecipherable Antistructural Formulae Review

“I like to think, two years into my writing gig here at Angry Metal Guy, that I would have a pretty solid idea as to how to approach a review at any given time. Listen to an album over and over, look up band’s page, throw together some lofty or detrimental words, give it a number, and *BOOM!* Pictures, publish, print, next. But there will come a time when a band puts out an album where you’re perplexed as to how to approach, grade, or even talk about it.” From India with hate.