Instrumental Metal

Dysrhythmia – Coffin of Conviction Review

Dysrhythmia – Coffin of Conviction Review

“Metal identity often rests in the tongue curling, the glottal fluttering, and the breath-rendering prowess that mic-holders abuse to fuse music with a unique enough mouth power. We even segregate genres based on the level of distortion and ill-advised technique that these brave souls apply—the shout-bark to the core kiddies, the shrieky wail to the frosty tones of LARPing black metal enthusiasts, the septic gurgle to death metal. Then, do we call it brave when a band like Dysrhythmia thinks to conjure the same riff-led drive and drama without verbal assistance?” Hush, hush, keep it down now.

Nuclear Power Trio – Wet Ass Plutonium Review

Nuclear Power Trio – Wet Ass Plutonium Review

“I know this looks like the daftest thing imaginable, but stay with me here: this is actually brilliant. I have no idea what led to one pun escalating quite so far out of control, but here we are: the Nuclear Power Trio. Three guys in terrifying dictator masks, playing Latin fusion instrumental metal, brilliantly. Three years ago I loved their EP A Clear and Present Rager, which brought me in with a comedy video and immediately gripped me with the quality of the music. Wet Ass Plutonium is their debut full-length. Does an instrumental band teetering on the edge of being a novelty act have a full album in them?” Strong Mancore

Lybica – Lybica Review

Lybica – Lybica Review

“First and foremost, and this should come as no surprise to any of you… but this wins Cover o’ the Year for me. Hands down, no competition. Sure, you’ve got your Eliran Kantors, your Travis Smiths, and your Necrolords. And that’s all fine and dandy. But here, we have a proud, majestic cat with its tongue out, as if to say, “I’m here, world… and I shall blep.” It’s only fitting, then, that Lybica, the South Floridian instrumental band featuring Killswitch Engage’s Justin Foley and members of Gravel Kings, would name themselves after the African wildcat species often referenced as the godfather to the modern-day domesticated cat.” Cats in the belfry.