Metal Blade

Desaster – Churches Without Saints Review

Desaster – Churches Without Saints Review

“It’s been 4 long years since we got a Desaster album, and the world has certainly gone to Hell in a deathbasket without them. Though it does seem highly on brand for these sleazy creepers to release their ninth platter o’ splatter at the tail end of a global pandemic, so here comes Churches Without Saints, ready or not. For those of you not in the know, Desaster play an unhinged, unpolished style of blackened thrash with loads of classic metal influences crammed into every available nook, cranny and orifice. They’ve never cared about what’s trendy or popular, relentlessly pounding away with their caveman blackthrash style one decade after another like the remorseless war grinders they are.” St. Desaster.

Endseeker – Mount Carcass Review

Endseeker – Mount Carcass Review

“When I pluck a festering slab of death metal from the fetid pit that is our promo sump – a rare enough occurrence for me – the last thing I expect to be presented with is a political message. No doubt those more learned in the ways of death, will point me in the direction of many a OSDM band that deals in heavy politics but my brain does not connect the genre with current affairs. Hamburg, Germany’s Endseeker, however, do just that on their third record, Mount Carcass.” Death in the news.

Cult of Lilith – Mara

Cult of Lilith – Mara

Cult of Lilith is one of those bands that are in the middle of what journalists and label blurb writers might call a ‘meteoric rise.’ Hailing from Iceland, the quintet has only one EP and no demos to their name since their inception in 2015. Yet Mara, their debut full-length, is already coming out through Metal Blade, one of the biggest labels in the business. On top of that, none other than semi-classical master painter and annual album art top 10 contestant Eliran Kantor delivered the ever excellent cover, and producer Dave Otero has such names as Cattle Decapitation, Archspire and Cephalic Carnage on his resume.” Big buzz, big expectations.

The Black Dahlia Murder – Verminous Review

The Black Dahlia Murder – Verminous Review

“Hot on the heels of the fantastic Nightbringers, my hopes for the latest from The Black Dahlia Murder could not have been more detached from reality. Of course, those expectations couldn’t and wouldn’t pan out… but not how you might expect. If Nightbringers saw a wizened The Black Dahlia Murder reflecting on Nocturnal and their launch into outer space, then Verminous ruminates on Deflorate, Ritual, and Everblack, the records that kept them aloft among the stars.” Great expectations, dangerous expectations.

Master Boot Record – Floppy Disk Overdrive Review

Master Boot Record – Floppy Disk Overdrive Review

Master Boot Record first came to my attention a few years ago as a novelty synth-metal nerd music act that made good coding music. After a hard disk full of releases in their first couple of years, Interrupt Request was released in 2017. At that point, I suddenly realized that MBR had privilege escalated from novelty act to serious music. Nothing had changed about the style or the presentation, but after iterative improvements, the quality of the songwriting demanded that they be taken seriously.” Disc blaster.

Angry Metal Primer – Cattle Decapitation

Angry Metal Primer – Cattle Decapitation

“From their grisly origins in goregrind to their current set of genre-defying extreme albums, Cattle Decapitation have always been both provocative and purposeful. While crusading against the meat industry, animal testing, environmental destruction or transphobia, Travis Ryan’s stomach-turning lyrics often take to extremes of irony to turn abstract, far-away injustice into a personal danger. But the band climbed a long way to the top of their current soapbox.” Shake, cattle and roll.

Allegaeon – Apoptosis Review

Allegaeon – Apoptosis Review

“Almost three years ago, as a probationary noob, I was tasked to review the bloated, brickwalled behemoth that was Allegaeon’s Proponent for Sentience. I argued that taken as a whole, the 72-minute album was beyond overwritten and overwrought even before the utterly crushed production ruined what was left. It turned out to be my least popular opinion since I argued in high school that metal bands without growls or screams were still metal (that actually happened.)” Bruise the messenger.