Naturmacht Productions

The Art of Labelling – Pt I

The Art of Labelling – Pt I

“The more time I’ve spent reviewing stuff on this here blog, the more I’ve begun to take note of record labels, to the point now that certain labels generate certain expectations for an album. With that realization, I became more interested in labels, how they work and the people behind them.” Behind the music lies the work.

Dawn of Ouroboros – The Art of Morphology Review

Dawn of Ouroboros – The Art of Morphology Review

“I found Dawn of Ouroboros out walking after midnight through the Bandcamp grounds, and while I may have ultimately been hauled back to my angry metal prison in a most silverback-ed and unceremonious fashion, you can bet your sorry ass that I managed to smuggle the Californians’ debut back with me. You’re welcome.” Muppet Mythos.

Marrasmieli – Between Land and Sky Review

Marrasmieli – Between Land and Sky Review

“At any given time, it’s a safe bet that I’m craving new atmospheric black metal. Take your blackest metal impulses, turn down the fury and turn up the melodies, and I’m probably a happy fan! I enjoy black metal a lot, but tend to prefer less angry and more melody in the style. So seeing Marrasmieli and their debut album, Between Land and Sky labelled as “folk/black metal” in the Promo Pit was plenty good enough for me.” Black lite.

Dauþuz – Monvmentvm [Things You Might Have Missed 2019]

Dauþuz – Monvmentvm [Things You Might Have Missed 2019]

“Oh God, not you guys again. It’s fucking December, don’t y’all have halls to deck and neighborhoods to ruin with your festive warbling? I’m a busy Muppet, yo, I don’t have time to babble about the great shit you couldn’t be bothered to find on your own. Nope, I’m putting my foot down; I don’t care how much you goons look forward to TYMHM season, I’m not even a little bit interested in sharing a single one my Bandcamp riches with you bastards/bastardettes and that’s that.” Dig that hole.

Keys of Orthanc – A Battle In The Dark Lands of The Eye… Review

Keys of Orthanc – A Battle In The Dark Lands of The Eye… Review

“Given the right formula, the right ingredients, and the right opportunity, metal — music in general, but metal for our purposes — can be the gateway into new worlds. Using metal as a means for escapism is both wonderfully cathartic and cathartically wonderful. And I don’t mean that in the generic Nightwish-esque ‘how about that wanderlust, eh?’ kind of way. I mean when metal grabs you by the throat, drags you across the threshold and laughs mercilessly when you try to explain that one does not simply walk into Mordor. At least, that’s what Keys of Orthanc are doing here.” Eye came, Eye saw.

Grima – Will of the Primordial Review

Grima – Will of the Primordial Review

“Being in forests for extended periods makes me uneasy, because 50 feet of visibility feels claustrophobic when you’re used to seeing the point where the Earth curves away. Russian atmo-black duo Grima have no such qualms. Hailing from Siberia and that same boreal forest, ‘taiga’ to them, they make music to ‘worship the elder forest…where the Grima is a supreme god…who protects only those who live in a forest, and punishes everyone who does not respect nature.’ To which I say, backing away slowly, ‘Whoa fellas, we’re all nature lovers here. Forests, amirite?'” Tree mugger.

Burial in the Woods – Church of Dagon Review

Burial in the Woods – Church of Dagon Review

“The difference a single instrument can make is incredible. Barring the obvious candidates, like voice and drums, you can change an entire band’s sound with a single addition. Nightwish makes standard power metal until you add in the orchestrations. Wilderun play pretty neat symphonic metal, but throw in a mandolin and see how that changes things. It’s these small flourishes that help many of our favorite bands to win the battle against homogeneity. In the spheres of death-doom, Burial in the Woods seek similar uniqueness with their debut effort, Church of Dagon.” Church is kvlt.

Isgalder – The Red Wanderer Review

Isgalder – The Red Wanderer Review

“The quality of an album’s production is a pretty common theme for reviews and comment sections here at Angry Metal Guy. We’ve all heard them — great albums that have been brickwalled, suffocated, or buried behind a head-scratching production choice that probably made perfect sense to the producer at the time. So when I received The Red Wanderer, the debut album from Isgalder, who play pagan black metal, and saw that the band produced the album themselves, I was apprehensive.” Extreme noise terror.