Netherlands Metal

Distant – Aeons of Oblivion Review

Distant – Aeons of Oblivion Review

“Netherlands outfit Distant emerged on the scene with 2019’s Tyrannotophia debut, showcasing their self-proclaimed downtempo deathcore brand, with atmospheric stylings. While potential was evident, overall the album fell short of the mark, marred by monotonous writing and lack of interesting and dynamic arrangements. I missed their stopgap EP from 2020, but with two years having slipped by I plunge in with trepidation and hope to see if Distant have revamped their brand enough to sustain a deeper level of engagement.” Maintaining minimum safe distance.

An Autumn for Crippled Children – As The Morning Dawns We Close Our Eyes Review

An Autumn for Crippled Children – As The Morning Dawns We Close Our Eyes Review

“What got you into metal? For me, it was blackgaze. I know, I know, it’s hard to believe your pal Doomy wasn’t raised on a diet of Bathory and his enemies’ livers; but as a teenager in the 90’s, I was mostly into indie rock and shoegaze. My entry into metal came later on, when bands like Lantlôs, Deafheaven and Alcest combined the dreamy, ethereal tones of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive with the fury of second-wave black metal. Within this group was the Netherlands’ An Autumn for Crippled Children, who leaned even more heavily into indie territory with their embrace of dream-pop and post rock.” Won’t someone think of the children?

Celestial Season – The Secret Teachings Review

Celestial Season – The Secret Teachings Review

“Talk about unexpectedly bumping into a long lost friend! Back in the 90s when the doom death movement was new and being driven by the “Peaceville Three,” there was a lesser known Dutch group called Celestial Season trying to horn in on the grimly emo fun. I first encountered them when I bought their 1995 sophomore album Solar Lovers and ended up quite taken with their gloomy yet accessible style. There were some great moments and I even loved their rendition of Ultravox‘s classic 80s hit “Vienna.” After that I never heard from Celestial Season again.” Surprise homework assignment!

Kaoteon – Kaoteon Review

Kaoteon – Kaoteon Review

“With a one-sheet that closed with “FFO: Behemoth, MardukWatain, and My Dying Bride,” I expected competently played blackened death metal… with weepy violins, morose lyrics, or whatever else that could possibly be associated with My Dying Bride that would potentially throw a huge monkey wrench into the classic blackened death metal formula.” If you can dodge a wrench….

Angrily Unreviewed: Supreme Pain – Divine Incarnation

Angrily Unreviewed: Supreme Pain – Divine Incarnation

You know, maybe the idea for this column wasn’t one of my best. It certainly isn’t self serving to continually call ourselves out for what we missed. It Kind of makes us look like jackasses and dullards. Be that as it may, our international staff of two just can’t know all or hear all. So, as unflattering as this is, here is yet another release we missed! Supreme Pain is a brutal death metal act hailing from Holland and Divine Incarnation is their third full length (available via Massacre Records). This is my first experience hearing them and I am quite impressed. They certainly live up to their name and bring you some serious pain. Their approach is in line with the classic Florida death style pioneered (and subsequently abandoned) by Morbid Angel and this sounds a lot like the classic albums of the formerly Morbid ones. There are also hints of Deicide and the occasional flash of Immolation to be found slithering around here and there. With a list of influences like that, you pretty much know you’ll be hammered into pancaked shit over the course of the nine tracks herein and they do it with flare, style and technical finesse.