Nuclear Blast Records

Lucifer – Lucifer V Review

Lucifer – Lucifer V Review

“Ah, Lucifer. I remember listening to their self-titled debut album back in 2015 and being immediately hooked by the killer pipes of frontwoman Johanna Platow Andersson and their take on fuzzy, doomy occult rock. But as I sit here to craft a review of Lucifer’s fifth album (aptly titled Lucifer V), I must admit that after that very first dance with the devil in the pale moonlight, I haven’t listened to them much in the intervening years.” New year, same Devil.

Sadus – The Shadow Inside Review

Sadus – The Shadow Inside Review

“The late 90s may have seen Sadus wandering too deep into (then) modern, groovy, and progressive sounds, and the 2006 offering Out for Blood leaning further into weird synth intros, drop-tuned guitars, thrash heresy. But, at the core of their most beloved outings, the backbone of Sadus was always a neck-snapping, zig-zag riffcraft.” Unsung but vicious.

Suffocation – Hymns from the Apocrypha Review

Suffocation – Hymns from the Apocrypha Review

“Legend has it, if you say Frank Mullen’s name in the mirror three times after dark, the seminal vocalist appears behind you and unleashes an almighty roar into your bloody earholes. For the first time in the lengthy career of the New York brutal death pioneers, the immense, muffled growls of Mullen are absent, as a new era begins in the Suffocation camp.” Old pros restricting airflows.

Fuming Mouth – Last Day of Sun Review

Fuming Mouth – Last Day of Sun Review

“A concept album is risky when you’re as meatheaded as Massachusetts’ Fuming Mouth. Don’t get me wrong, Last Day of Sun’s concept is unique and powerful, an apocalyptic vision of a world destined for darkness in twenty-four hours (hence the title) – a story further fueled by the act’s mastermind, vocalist, and guitarist Mark Whelan’s triumphant battle over cancer. For an act that has rarely been called the “thinking man’s” anything, it’s pretty high-brow to fuse an approach of death metal and hardcore with such heart-wrenching emotion.” Sun’s out, HM-2 out.

Green Lung – This Heathen Land Review

Green Lung – This Heathen Land Review

“There is something familiar and charming about what Green Lung do and do so well. Blending the likes of Sabbath, Jethro Tull, Boston and more, the band harks back to an earlier time and, on Black Harvest, managed to do that with their own voice. However, there are lots of other things I can reach to for comfort and familiarity, perhaps explaining why I haven’t reached for Black Harvest until thinking about this review. What staying power does This Heathen Land have?” Of Lungs and lands.

Thy Art Is Murder – Godlike Review

Thy Art Is Murder – Godlike Review

“Hate them or love them, you know them. Australia’s Thy Art Is Murder catapulted into the deathcore stratosphere in the early 2010s, through the technical The Adversary (2010) and the powerful Hate (2012). Despite its inconsistency, Thy Art Is Murder’s output earned sizable crossover appeal from death metal fans; think All Shall Perish, not Bring Me the Horizon. Godlike, whose release was delayed a week by line-up drama, follows four years after the middling deathcore-fest Human Target.” Thy Art is Drama.

Cryptopsy – As Gomorrah Burns Review

Cryptopsy – As Gomorrah Burns Review

“Few death metal acts have a run of albums as divisive as Cryptopsy. Starting life as an uncompromisingly brutal tech-death act, they took the world by storm with 1994s Blasphemy Made Flesh and 1996s iconic None So Vile. Their hyperkinetic blend of speed, technicality, and heaviness set them apart from every other death outfit save Gorguts and Suffocation. Sadly, these epic albums proved hard to top and the subsequent years were not so kind to Cryptopsy.” Crypt skeptics reunion.

Till the Dirt – Outside the Spiral Review

Till the Dirt – Outside the Spiral Review

Till the Dirt is comprised of Atheist members Shaefer, guitarist Jerry Witunsky, and bassist Yoav Ruiz-Feingold, as well as Soreption guitarist Ian Waye and Fermentor drummer Dylan Marks. With an Atheist-heavy lineup, what can we expect from Till the Dirt? Well, death metal with nu-metal was not on my Bingo card.” Things that should stay buried.

Exmortus – Necrophony Review

Exmortus – Necrophony Review

“With harsh, deathy vocals and neoclassical character, they began harnessing their style into records of swirling, whirling, technical thrash. While many would argue the ranking of their discography, it’s hard to deny that 2014’s Slave to the Sword was peak Exmortus. This neatly-packaged album showcased the very best Exmortus can be. With two follow-up albums since Slave to the Sword, the band continued to wow and amaze with their impressive noodling. But, as suggested earlier, they’ve yet to create a concise, flowing album like Slave to the Sword.” Unfinished swords.