Nuclear Blast Records

Behemoth – Opvs Contra Natvram Review

Behemoth – Opvs Contra Natvram Review

“While I don’t consider myself to be a huge Behemoth fan—in fact, I haven’t even listened to all of their releases—I rather enjoy most of the band’s albums with which I’m familiar. Demigod is a blackened death classic, and I like The Apostasy quite a bit too—and not just because it features an appearance by my beloved Warrel Dane (R.I.P.). The Satanist had some great moments, but the amount of pretense on display was a bit unnerving. And that sense of foreboding was ultimately justified with the release of its follow-up, the at times cringy I Loved You at Your Darkest. While initially hesitant to cover that album’s successor, I was overcome by curiosity.” Curiosity and the beast.

Machine Head – ØF KingdØM and CrØWn Review

Machine Head – ØF KingdØM and CrØWn Review

“For better or worse, Machine Head has returned with another album. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve said it before, I’m a diehard fan of Flynn and co. But it’s hard to imagine the band returning with anything decent after the absolute dumpster fire that’s Catharsis. Not to mention the resulting departure of everyone but Flynn. But Machine Head has done it before. Remember Supercharger and the brilliant resurrection that is Through the Ashes of Empires? Without that struggle and success, we would never have received The Blackening. So, maybe there’s still hope.” Damn the Machine.

The Halo Effect – Days of the Lost Review

The Halo Effect – Days of the Lost Review

“Longtime readers of the AMG Diaries will know my opinions regarding so-called “supergroups.” All too often these star-studded vanity vehicles promise much and deliver little, generally falling way short of anything truly super. With this jaded but entirely realistic worldview, I approached the debut from The Halo Effect, the project composed of Dark Tranquillity‘s Mikael Stanne and four former members of In Flames. That lineup makes The Halo Effect a supergroup for Swedish melodeth purposes if nothing else, and on Days of the Lost, they largely stick to what they know best, dropping an album’s worth of material that sits roughly halfway between the members’ main acts.” Heroes and halos.

Soulfly – Totem Review

Soulfly – Totem Review

“For the most part, I enjoy Soulfly. Even if they rarely bring anything new to the table. I guess Soulfly and Primitive contradict that statement because Max Cavalera explored a new territory of Korny, Limp Bizkit metal. Contradicting because, while Cavalera stepped out of his comfort zone, I fucking hate those albums—even more than I hate Ferrous. Yet, when Marc Rizzo joined the ranks on 2004’s Prophecy, Cavalera and crew brought thrash, death, and inklings of Chaos A.D. and Roots back into the mix. From that point, I’ve grown accustomed to the existence of Soulfly and enjoy albums like Dark Ages, Conquer, and Enslaved. Now it’s 2022, and Rizzo is gone. What does this mean for ole Maxie?” Mad Maxie.

Belphegor -The Devils Review

Belphegor -The Devils Review

“As I approach the end of Belphegor‘s catalog, I’m reminded of how consistent the band has been for the last 25 years. Even other AMG writers have given equal praise to the band’s material—regardless if it’s 1997’s classic Blutsabbath or 2011’s monstrous Blood Magick Necromance. As the band moved into this hard-hitting era, Belphegor‘s output didn’t disappoint. You can attribute their success to familiarity and consistent deliverance of concussive riffage. But, after all these years of comfortability and expected outcome, something looms in the skies above Austria. Whatever’s in the air, Belphegor has partooken. And it isn’t what you expect.” The Devil has tricks.

Horizon Ignited – Towards the Dying Lands Review

Horizon Ignited – Towards the Dying Lands Review

“”It’s been a while since I’ve enjoyed some good ol’ melodeath,” so thought I as I opted to review Towards the Dying Lands, the sophomore full-length release from Finland’s Horizon Ignited. And, indeed, it has been—I feel like it’s been forever since I’ve really enjoyed new melodeath. And, of course, my well-meaning colleagues and cellmates here at Angry Metal Guy do tend to descend on all new melodeath entries like vultures, so I often have to rely on their opinions about new releases in the style, which are of dubious quality at best. All of this is to say I was fairly excited to begin listening to Towards the Dying Lands, which, it turns out, is a solid sample of the genre.” Melo bellows.

Kreator – Hate Über Alles Review

Kreator – Hate Über Alles Review

“More than any notable thrash band of the 80s, Kreator dabbled in different styles, tweaked and retweaked their formula, sometimes to their detriment. 1992s Renewal tried to fuse hardcore and industrial elements into their thrash sound with wildly mixed results, and Endorama went for something like a goth metal style that was weird to say the least. In recent years they’ve been more restrained in their experimentation, incorporating doses of anthemic traditional metal into their sound. It’s been 5 years since Gods of Violence and the singles released for Hate Über Alles suggested Kreator had been bit by the experimentation bug once again.” Impact Kreator.

Immolation – Acts of God Review

Immolation – Acts of God Review

“As any fan of death metal will attest, Immolation need no introduction. Their contorted take on riff and rhythm has informed the extreme pursuits of an entire generation. To call them influential would be to willfully undermine, not only their legacy, but the fact that their discography is almost spotless. Indeed, back in 2017 I reviewed Immolation‘s tenth album, Atonement, and awarded my first ever 4.5. The record captured my attention with its assured sense of self and continues to impress to this day. Now, five years later, I am once more tasked with a brutal burden as eleventh album Acts of God prepares to dip its hand right back into that everlasting fire.” No God, one Master.