Prophecy Productions

Drown – Subaqueous Review

Drown – Subaqueous Review

“Funeral doom was never a genre I willingly embraced or ever truly “got,” but as I grow older I seem to be finding more and more affinity for it. Perhaps that’s because I’m getting closer to picking out caskets for my own funeral, or maybe age has slowed me to the point where I can better appreciate other slow things, like turtles and the US legal system. Whatever the case may be, Subaqueous, the second album by Drown, is helping bring me around on this most niche of genres.” Death in the water.

Crowhurst and Gavin Bryars – Incoherent American Narrative Review

Crowhurst and Gavin Bryars – Incoherent American Narrative Review

“Not knowing what to expect from Crowhurst and Gavin Bryars‘s new album Incoherent American Narrative, I snuggled into a corner of my couch with a piping hot mug of mint tea at my side and put on my Sennheisers. Now that I have experienced the album more than a handful of times, the idea that keeps coming to mind is that of a sound collage. Sound collages, like their visual counterparts, are compositions created from “gluing” together various, oftentimes disparate, sound pieces. Incoherent American Narrative fits that description to a T.” Art and crafts.

Novembers Doom – Nephilim Grove Review

Novembers Doom – Nephilim Grove Review

Novembers Doom has admirably avoided becoming a static recording act over its quarter of a century knocking around the metal scene. They started life as morose doom death but mutated into various permutations of doom and/or death over time. I don’t even think of them as a true doom death act these days, and lately they’ve been drifting toward the mellower side of Opeth and the glum mope rock territories trod by modern Katatonia. On their 10th album Nephilim Grove, they continue to carefully straddle several genres, doing their best to consolidate their influences.” Ennui for you and me.

Disillusion – The Liberation Review

Disillusion – The Liberation Review

“I’ve gushed about the astonishing debut album from Germany’s Disillusion before, and consider 2004’s Back to Times of Splendor to be one of melodic death metal’s finest post millennium offerings. Following-up their phenomenal masterwork was always going to be difficult, so rather than repeat themselves Disillusion took a significant and questionable stylistic detour on 2006’s ambitious but underwhelming Gloria. Now, following a Tool-length break from the studio, Disillusion make their long-awaited and highly anticipated return via their third LP, entitled The Liberation.” Under no illusions.

Thief – Map of Lost Keys Review

Thief – Map of Lost Keys Review

Thief is the pet project of Dylan Neal, a dulcimer player (dulcimist?) for the unconventional experimental black metal band Botanist. Thief’s music takes on a different theme entirely, however, from Botanist’s quirky style of environmentally themed “green-metal.” Map of Lost Keys, Thief’s sophomore album, swaps the hammered dulcimer for a myriad of electronics to produce late night music designed for haunted ballrooms and electric churches. While no traditional black metal demon shrieks or vicious tremolo picking can be heard on Map of Lost Keys, Thief remain obstinate in their attempt to appeal to fans of heavier genres.” Mischief managing.

Bethlehem – Lebe Dich Leer Review

Bethlehem – Lebe Dich Leer Review

“I had picked Lebe Dich Leer for my review queue simply because it sounded interesting, only to find out that they were a foundational band in the development of suicidal black metal and their history was surrounded by controversy over false accusations of Satanism by concerned parents/idiots. An intimidating prospect for sure. So as you proceed, keep in mind that the following is from the perspective of someone venturing out of their comfort zone and new to the story of Bethlehem in general, so you can safely ignore my opinion if it suits you.” Green is the new black.

A Forest of Stars – Grave Mounds and Grave Mistakes Review

A Forest of Stars – Grave Mounds and Grave Mistakes Review

A Forest of Stars have been traveling on an upwards cosmic trajectory since their third full-length, 2012’s A Shadowplay for Yesterdays. For a band who didn’t have plans to record anything after their 2008 debut, or even play live, A Forest of Stars are a great example of what a collective and relentless passion and creativity can do for a band.” Starry starry night.