Season of Mist Records

Mora Prokaza – By Chance Review

Mora Prokaza – By Chance Review

“Your fifth grade science fair project. Frankenstein’s monster. That godawful sandwich you made of leftover hash browns, macaroni and cheese, hot dog buns, and spaghetti sauce. Said godawful sandwich growing furry mold sitting in the back of your fridge after vowing you’ll eat it later. What do all these have in common? They’re experiments, forays into the unknown. Rife with experimentation, will Mora Prokaza‘s latest blackened oddity fall into the happy slurpee realm or the “acquired taste” maggot cheese kingdom?” I’ll just stick with the Haggis.

Voyager – Colours in the Sun Review

Voyager – Colours in the Sun Review

“A new Voyager album is always an unknown quantity. I’ve dearly loved some of the Australian prog-meisters material, and felt ambivalent about some of it as well. I raved about 2011s The Meaning of I, but struggled to love parts of followup V. They won me over again on 2017s Ghost Mile, so naturally I hoped the good times would keep rolling with their new opus Colours in the Sun. And why shouldn’t they keep rolling?” Why indeed.

Hate Eternal – Upon Desolate Sands Review

Hate Eternal – Upon Desolate Sands Review

“‘This ain’t your father’s death metal!’ Too often do reviewers or promos use this cliché, but in the case of Hate Eternal, I beg to differ. They decidedly are my father’s death metal, but not because he’s ever cared about or even heard a note from them, but rather because the band, particularly Erik Rutan, embody the traits my father values and passed on to me. Rutan’s brutal studio reputation of pushing musicians’ talents to their limits and then a bit further is precisely how my father and I work on any project together. There’s a certain honesty to Hate Eternal’s music, an honesty which can only come from toil.” Hating mediocrity.

Black Tusk – T.C.B.T. Review

Black Tusk – T.C.B.T. Review

“In theory, Georgia’s Black Tusk is a band I should like more than I do. Admittedly I’ve lost touch with them and haven’t revisited any of their material recently, but previous experiences haven’t exactly compelled me to come back for more, despite never really being able to pinpoint what the problem is.” Fear of the Tusk.

Alkaloid – Liquid Anatomy Review

Alkaloid – Liquid Anatomy Review

The Malkuth Grimoire marked an exciting beginning for the star-studded line-up of Alkaloid. Escaping the imposing shadows of the band members other projects in unique and often unconventional ways, the album was very well received by myself and the metal community at large. Despite the chinks in its futuristic armory, such as the excessive bloat and ambitious but not always successful experimentation, Alkaloid emphatically proved they weren’t content to coast by with another typical tech death project. Now Hannes Grossman, Christian Münzner and co return with Liquid Anatomy.” Fluid dynamics.

Philip H Anselmo & The Illegals – Choosing Mental Illness as a Virtue Review

Philip H Anselmo & The Illegals – Choosing Mental Illness as a Virtue Review

“I try not to expect much from you people, but I think it’s safe to assume that one or two of you just may have heard of one Philip H. Anselmo, and this being the case you may (the ‘may’ is silent) have an opinion regarding the man. I don’t particularly care about any of that, but he definitely does, and this is painfully clear on Choosing Mental Illness As a Virtue, Phil’s second full-length endeavor with The Illegals.” Philling in the gaps.

Earth Electric – Vol I: Solar Review

Earth Electric – Vol I: Solar Review

“Rune Eriksen is a well-traveled gentleman of metal. He was an important part of Mayhem‘s second creative wave and continues to be a foundational part of Aura Noir. He’s also known for his gothic doom vehicle Ava Inferi, which released one of the most enduring albums in the genre with 2011s Onyx. Now he’s launching another project with long-time Ava Inferi collaborator Carmen Susana Simoes. Earth Electric could be called experimental goth rock, and rocking it is, taking an enormous 70s rock influence and shoehorning it into Ava Inferi‘s ethereal goth style.” Rock in a soft place.