Seasons of Mist

Deathwhite – For a Black Tomorrow Review

Deathwhite – For a Black Tomorrow Review

“Let’s turn our attention to the other great mystery of our time – the identity of the members of Deathwhite. With two slobberknocker EPs of excellent goth-doom under their invisible belts, we still have nary a clue who they are or what they’re trying to hide. All we know is that the band features members from better known acts and likely hails from the Massachusetts/Pennsylvania region. Given this light evidentiary trail and their carefully cultivated enigma status, I wasn’t even surprised when their first full-length appeared out of nowhere, only to be pulled back a week later and held from release for almost a year. Now that For a Black Tomorrow has finally re-appeared, it raises more questions than answers.” Spook-core is suspiciously good.

Hooded Menace – Ossuarium Silhouettes Unhallowed Review

Hooded Menace – Ossuarium Silhouettes Unhallowed Review

“Furthering what is sure to be the metallic trend of 2018, Lasse Pyykkö has seen fit to bestow upon us another nexus of death-doom via that sinister shroud, Hooded Menace. Fifth album, Ossuarium Silhouettes Unhallowed, shrugs off the gossamer gathered between releases and prepares to enrapture a captive audience with riffs of yore and environs unsavory, but this time, with an added depth of disease.” Unhallowed Eve.

Hierophant – Mass Grave Review

Hierophant – Mass Grave Review

“when I receive a promo for a band (in this case, Italy’s Hierophant), and the one-sheet that accompanies their fourth album, Mass Graves, states rather emphatically, “No pink unicorns here,” and they still don’t supply us with a promo pic? Prepare for battle, son.” Doom death in the Age of Pink.

Esben and the Witch – Older Terrors Review

Esben and the Witch – Older Terrors Review

“I’m not alone among the AMG staff in having fallen hard for The Gathering‘s career defining Mandylion release back in 95. That platter combined elements of doom and goth rock in a way that had never been done before and created something haunting, sad and achingly beautiful. The band quickly drifted toward more commercial waters, and many (myself included) were left hungering for more of what Mandylion delivered. Perhaps that’s why my ears pricked up when I heard a snippet of the Older Terrors promo from hitherto unknown by me English three-piece, Esben and the Witch.” Oh, Mandy, you came and you found me an Esben….