Toxic Holocaust

Bonehunter – Children of the Atom Review

Bonehunter – Children of the Atom Review

“Well, here I am, again, reviewing another Bonehunter record. It’s felt like anywhere from three years to ten since I reviewed the band’s 2015 debut, Evil Triumphs Again. Yet, it feels like it was only yesterday that I reviewed their follow-up record, Sexual Panic Human Machine. This is most likely due to the band’s progression from Bone(d)hunter on their debut to Bone(r)hunter on Sexual Panic Human Machine. I mean, the 0.5-point improvement between these two records shouldn’t go to their throbbing heads but this Finnish trio did hint at some originality with Sexual Panic. But, an album glistening with bear dick only goes so far before our HR-friendly Grier gets bored.” Roll the Boner.

Mongrel’s Cross – Psalter of the Royal Dragon Court Review

Mongrel’s Cross – Psalter of the Royal Dragon Court Review

“We’ve all been there. We’ve all strived to transcend weakness, to beat back the forces of oppression, to rip the fucking heart from the proverbial lion. Deströyer 666 use the motif of a wolf to convey this sense of power; fellow Australians Mongrel’s Cross use a dragon. Their 2012 debut The Sins of Aquarius was rife with such smoldering imagery, taking the Australian black thrash tapestry and soaking it in the grandiose swagger of Bathory’s Blood Fire Death. The result was both a personal favorite and one of the style’s most potent albums in recent years.” Dragons, Bathory and battles, oh my!

Cemetery Lust – Rotting in Piss Review

Cemetery Lust – Rotting in Piss Review

“If you’ve ever had a nasty scab that just wouldn’t fall off and wondered what lurked underneath, it was Cemetery Lust, the audio equivalent of gangrene, sepsis, piss and pus. This infectiously thrownback thrash crew last tested the strength of my immune system with 2014s Orgies of Abomination, and to this day I’ve yet to scrape off all the ooze and offal spewed by that piece of nastiness. Four years later, they recur with the charmingly titled, Rotting in Piss, and all pathogens are once again airborne, this time with a hint of asbestos for extra lung fun.” Urine trouble.

Necrosexual – Grim 1 Review

Necrosexual – Grim 1 Review

“Apparently being ‘necro’ is a big thing right now. Necrophobic and Necropanther have new albums out this month, and the redundantly-titled Necrodeath are releasing a new record in March. With all that death piling up, where do Necrosexual squeeze themselves in? On the greasy avenue of primitive blackened thrash, of course.” Love life, not the dead.

Deathcult – Cult of the Goat Review

Deathcult – Cult of the Goat Review

“I’m not quite sure how it happens but I always seem to find myself buried in black metal at the end of the year. It’s not like 2015, where Kampfar’s Profan squeezed its way into my top ten at the last second, but there are some last-minute gems from 2017. And two, in particular, involve the infamous Hoest. Last month, there was Taake’s Kong Vinter. This month, there’s the return of Norway’s sibling-driven Deathcult.” Goatloads of fun.

Urn – The Burning Review

Urn – The Burning Review

“From Beethoven to Brian Eno, mankind has toiled for centuries to compose the greatest music human minds can fathom. Alas it was not until the mid-90s that music finally attained its supreme form, when two metal genres miraculously fused in the unholy union known as ‘blackened thrash.’” It was the best of times, it was the the blast of times.

Weapönizer – Lawless Age Review

Weapönizer – Lawless Age Review

“Titties, rippling muscles, a motorcycle, and a horde of miscreants — what’s not to love about that artwork? Add in a promo blurb billing Weapönizer as a band for fans of everything from Deströyer 666 to The Road Warrior and I’m more curious than a 12-year-old boy outside a sleazy gentlemen’s club.” Law is for posers.

Thron – Thron Review

Thron – Thron Review

“Relentlessly picking on black metal bands whose members opt for anonymity is a favorite pastime of ours here at Angry Metal Guy, but it kinda sorta makes sense when you look at the practice from the band’s perspective. When trying to break into the scene, withholding one’s identity means that critics have only the music to go on, and if the musicians happen to suck, it eliminates any possibility of cred shredding in the eyes of the masses.” Secret identities are metal.