Uada

Uada – Djinn Review

Uada – Djinn Review

Uada have captured the hearts of many fans searching for plenty of melody with their fury or Mgła without the controversy. I was (and remain) a huge fan of the tight, energetic debut, but 2018’s Cult of a Dying Sun left me colder. I felt that the band were going through the motions, which concerned me given it was but a sophomore release. Take the essential formula of these two albums, ladle on more melody and add a few pinches of Mgła controversy and you have Djinn.” Djinn and juice.

Ages – Uncrown Review

Ages – Uncrown Review

“There’s something distinct, and distinctly satisfying, about the mid-90s surge of Scandinavian melodic death and melodic black metal. When the likes of Emperor, Sacramentum and Dissection were changing the face of metal they were precocious kids with precise and warped visions of what they wanted darkness and evil to sound like. I feel an oxymoronic cold warmth when hearing bands which fit this sound. Many bear the torch but few get so high as those early pioneers.” Heavy is the crown of ice and darkness.

Sol Sistere – Cold Extinguished Light Review

Sol Sistere – Cold Extinguished Light Review

“Ov all the cruel ironies in this angry metal world, black metal’s oversaturated state, at this point presumably mere days from breaching mainstream radio status, is likely the one that yanks my unicorn the most. That the brave new musical world discovered by such wanderers as Burzum, Mayhem, and Bathory would be further explored and defiled in time was never a question, yet the rampant proliferation of new obsidian acts we find ourselves plagued with is less akin to expansion than to… well, frankly, a fucking plague.” Semi-cold.

Groza – Unified in Void Review

Groza – Unified in Void Review

“I picked Groza from the promo bin for one simple reason: Mgla is a great fucking band, and Groza share their name with Mgla’s debut album. That’s not by accident, either. The promo blurb that accompanied Unified in Void was frank in its admission of Mgla influence, leaving me quite excited to hear what this German quartet had to offer.” Choose the form of the Destroyer.

Délétère – De Horae Leprae Review

Délétère – De Horae Leprae Review

“‘Délétère’. A word which translates from French into English as ‘deleterious’. Aside from sounding distinctly metal, it apparently means ‘harmful’ or ‘damaging’. Bear this in mind. Addressing the band that is the subject of today’s review, Délétère partake in the affecting métal noir Québécoise scene.” Québéc-core.

Uada – Cult of a Dying Sun Review

Uada – Cult of a Dying Sun Review

“2016 saw the release of the debut album by Portland’s Uada, entitled Devoid of Light (DoL). It was a top-drawer album on first listen, secured second place in my top 10 records of that year, and remains one of strongest examples of melodic black metal from this decade. Its greatest assets were assuredly its immediacy and infectiousness despite the typically macabre subject matter and black metal tools. A sophomore release is now due called Cult of a Dying Sun (CoaDS) and it faces the burden of unreasonable expectations.” Why no king flashmob? Uada!

Patria – Magna Adversia Review

Patria – Magna Adversia Review

“We know that art is often wrought in the forge of circumstance but beyond the personal biases, trials and tribulations of everyday life can the very climate we live in serve as a catalytic muse? Louisiana’s turgid humidity spawned swampy sludge metal and the pallid, frozen wastes of Scandinavia formed the backdrop against which black metal performs its danse macabre. It’s the latter’s frigid fingers that grip Magna Adversia, the latest release by Patria. But rather than hailing from Norway or Sweden, the band inhabits the mountainous south of Brazil.” Brazil is not a frostbitten kingdom.

Uada – Devoid of Light Review

Uada – Devoid of Light Review

“The first thing that struck me about Uada is that although they are categorically black metal, drawing influence from numerous sources, they’re so bright and energetic. There’s a vibrancy here which is missed entirely by so many of their blackened peers. The musicianship is enthusiastic, agile and infectious as neat ideas are incorporated throughout – I’m not supposed to be feel happy when listening to black metal but I invariably am with Devoid of Light.” We laughed, now we must applaud.