Noctus

Anathema – Distant Satellites Review

Anathema – Distant Satellites Review

“The transformation of Anathema has always been enigmatic to many metalheads. The obligatory rewind to their early 90’s pioneering death/doom records almost seems redundant now that this is their tenth album without a hint of metal in it. Any hope of them making a return to their roots is about as worthwhile as waiting for the new Kovenant album (why anyone wants it I cannot fathom). But the key difference here is that their abandonment of metal did them nothing but good…” Is the scarcity of precious metal still working out for these sullen fellows?

Lantlôs – Melting Sun Review

Lantlôs – Melting Sun Review

“So it seems after the polarizing response to Alcest‘s latest offering, Shelter, some metalheads are afraid that everything he touches will turn into a psuedo-sentimental Slowdive-worship band instead of the ‘post-black’ or ‘blackgaze’ monikers coined by passionate (and often clueless) fanatics.” Noctus braved daylight to bring you a review of Melting Sun… was it worth it?

Triptykon – Melana Chasmata Review

Triptykon – Melana Chasmata Review

“Tom G. Warrior has had a lot to prove since his blunders in the early 90’s. But it seems metalheads can finally put to rest any doubt that Tom knows what he’s doing, more than anyone, when it comes to punishing and dark recordings. The most startling thing is that even over 30 years into his career, he’s still getting better at it; his hybrid of black, doom, death and thrash metal never more convincing than in his latest effort, Melana Chasmata.” Noctus dons his Tom G. Warrior scarf and t-shirt for a hugely fanboyish salute to the man, the myth, the creator of Triptykon.

Woman is the Earth – Depths Review

Woman is the Earth – Depths Review

“It’s as if a new black metal band emerges from America every day, always with long song lengths and minimalistic ideas. Before I know it, a band is in their third album cycle before I’ve given them the time of day, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult for me to care about every other Ash Borer clone that pops out of the wilderness. But this band deserves attention because they’re one of the few to really get what music like this should be about – energy and atmosphere.” Noctus wants you to pay attention to this band, so you best do so.

Conan – Blood Eagle Review

Conan – Blood Eagle Review

“”Redundant genre, you say? Sorry, can’t hear you over ALL THESE AMPS!” say Conan ever so confidently. Or at least, I imagine that’s what they would say a few moments before bashing your skull in. Yes sir, Conan‘s brand of doom metal is ridiculously heavy and drony – to the point of almost seeming like a gimmick.” Crom laughs at your four winds, amps and droning! As Crom laughs, Noctus discusses Conan‘s brand of stoner doom.

Sunn O))) & Ulver – Terrestrials Review

Sunn O))) & Ulver – Terrestrials Review

“Allow me to give some context: I have much more experience with Sunn O))) than with Ulver. Frankly, Ulver hasn’t really interested me for a very long time. But Sunn O)))‘s collaborations have a great track record; their album with Boris was tremendous stuff — experimental music at its finest. And if there’s anything to take from Terrestrials, it’s that music isn’t mathematic and there’s no certainty that with all the right elements you’ll come out with an amazing album.” Can these two titans of weird possibly fail to make an interesting collaboration? Sheesh, is nothing certain anymore?

Graveborne – Through the Window of the Night Review

Graveborne – Through the Window of the Night Review

“To kick off 2014 there really is no more fitting genre to review than black metal. Why? Because it’s proof that absolutely nothing ever changes. In fact it’s almost a sign that the apocalypse most certainly is not nigh; the wind still blows, the trees still grow and black metal bands still wear bullet belts and corpse paint. But at some point as a community of metalheads we simply have to pull the wool from our eyes and admit to ourselves that there is absolutely no purpose to bands like Graveborne any more….” Noctus returns with a whole lot of angry and some lessons for our black metal brethren! Don the asbestos suit, Noctus!

An Autumn for Crippled Children – Try Not to Destroy Everything You Love Review

An Autumn for Crippled Children – Try Not to Destroy Everything You Love Review

“Today on Angry Metal Guy we’re pleased to present you with some depressive, experimental doom black… wait, are those pink orchids? How adorable! It’s times like this that question whether I was destined to be a flower-arranger rather than a metal reviewer, but thanks to the adventurous forays of An Autumn for Crippled Children (AAfCC herein), I can finally embrace the idea of being both.” And on this special day of Thanksgiving, please allow Noctus to give you the gift of crippled children.

Monolithe – Monolithe IV Review

Monolithe – Monolithe IV Review

“Considering the mighty seven year gap between Monolithe II and Monolithe III, it certainly comes as a surprise that this album arrived so soon, barely a year after III. Naturally, a four-part album series of crushing, spacey funeral doom, each with tracks spanning nearly an hour is as difficult a pill to swallow as one will find in this or any genre, but Monolithe have proven over the years they know exactly what they’re doing.” Our man Noctus seriously wet himself over the last album from these French doom-mongers. This time we outfitted him with young adult diapers and plastic wrapped his desk area. We learn from our mistakes….

Gorguts – Colored Sands Review

Gorguts – Colored Sands Review

“Let me know if you can find a metal band that utilizes dissonance and technicality to a large degree that doesn’t cite Gorgut‘s masterful work as an influence. I’ll probably be waiting a long time so I’ll bring a good book – it’s called “The Band That Pioneered Dissonance and Technicality in Death Metal” and it has the word ‘Gorguts‘ repeated over and over. But it’s that huge sense of respect for the band and the enormous anticipation for this release that made it such a tricky one for the legendary act. 12 years is not only a long time for hype to build around a record, but it also gives newcomers and pretenders a chance to overtake the legends should they prove unable to live up to their own mammoth legacy. After all, a lot of bands are remembered for their creative peak, even when they can’t maintain that level indefinitely. So perhaps Obscura and From Wisdom to Hate era was their peak and all they’ll really conjure up this time is a solid record, right?” And here is the other neglected gem we wanted to get to, but didn’t until now. You’re welcome!