Death Metal

Aronious – Irkalla Review

Aronious – Irkalla Review

“Well, this could have been awkward. In trying to research this week’s subject, I had become increasingly puzzled as to why I couldn’t find much on them. Nothing on AMG itself; nothing on Metal Archives, nothing on Facebook and so on. It turns out there had been a fluff up in the AMG Engine Room, meaning that the band’s name was misspelled in the promo sump. Once this snafu came to light, it also revealed that Aronious is not, in fact, new to AMG and it would seem I have unwittingly stolen reviewing rights from no lesser death metal scribe than Kronos.” Deathly strife.

Shuriken Cadaveric Entwinement – Constructing the Cataclysm Review

Shuriken Cadaveric Entwinement – Constructing the Cataclysm Review

“Let’s address the elephant in the dojo right away: Shuriken Cadaveric Entwinement is a stupid name. It’s one of hundreds in a long and not very proud line of uninspired, overly wordy death metal band names. I’m all for cool ninja stuff – my tattered Octagon DVD is a prized possession – but how does a shuriken even entwine someone? It doesn’t make sense. Still, my track record proves I’m attracted to bands with questionable names. The album art is cool, and I really wanted the music to match. Name and art aside, the band plays your typical classic style of balls to the bloody walls death metal.” Samurwhy?

Tomb of Finland – Across the Barren Fields Review

Tomb of Finland – Across the Barren Fields Review

“As I inch closer to hitting a full decade of writing for Angry Metal Guy Industries, Ltd., I like going back and revisiting bands I reviewed before, normally in hopeful anticipation of new material. Not only is it because of morbid curiosity in seeing any progress, but this is kinda-sorta like watching a child grow older before your eyes. You want what’s best for them. In 2015, I reviewed Below the Green, the debut album from Tom of… TOMB. TOMB of Finland. Sorry. That “b” is important, kiddos.” Look at this photograph!

Psycroptic – Divine Council Review

Psycroptic – Divine Council Review

“Though they arrived too late to take part in the birth of tech-death in the 1990s, Tasmania’s Psycroptic made a big mark on the genre just after the turn of the century, and by now they’re something of a legacy act. Eight albums in, Psycroptic have managed to retain their core sound, wrapped around Joe Haley’s long, eclectic riffs, for more than 20 years. The band augmented that thrashy tech death with gospel choirs for their most recent record, As the Kingdom Drowns, nearly escaping the debt of expectation set by the classic The Scepter of the Ancients back in 2003. Four years later, Divine Council nods towards the Kingdom, but doesn’t rely on past successes to make its mark.” Psy-ops.

Hautajaisyö – Ei hauta kysy lupaa Review

Hautajaisyö – Ei hauta kysy lupaa Review

“It’s always nice to get what you expect. Lately it’s been slim pickings in promo land—my vulture-esque colleagues have snatched up what little was there to begin with for the month of August, leaving me with naught but death metal and grindcore to choose from. Despite not having a ton of experience with the style—and yes, that is a disclaimer—I went with death metal. Finland’s Hautajaisyö, now releasing their fourth full-length album Ei hauta kysy lupaa, are promoted as death metal, used that cover over there for their album, and apparently believe “in raw and brutal music and dark themes.”” Haut in the city.

Fleshrot – Unburied Corpse Review

Fleshrot – Unburied Corpse Review

“Another day, another death metal album. This must have been how reviewers back in the time of my younger youth felt when rethrash brought us swaths of sweaty song-named bands who littered the 4th to 5th spots on the local concert circuit. For every Blood Incantation or Astral Tomb that pops along—bands who play recognizably death metal but with a sense of ambition or divergence—there are at least a dozen other Dead and Dripping or Molder style bands that leak out of the collective pool of putrid palm-muted chugs. From this same OSDM ooze Fleshrot has seeped into our sudoriferous sump leaving enough of an odor for me to take a second look in the perennial quest to find the most 1991 of what 2022 has to offer.” Slowly we Fleshrot.

Prosper or Perish – Shroud of Serpents Review

Prosper or Perish – Shroud of Serpents Review

“It’s been a good, long time since I’ve reviewed a melodic death metal album. Once upon a time, it was the only genre of music I would listen to, as it acted as a gateway portal between the classic style of heavy metal we all know and love, and the heavier, more extreme sounds that most of us flock to in droves after a while. Just like both extremes of the spectrum, the genre I’m focusing on definitely has its place, but unlike those extremes, it paints itself into a corner after a while, not looking to branch out or adapt without catastrophic results. Philadelphia’s Prosper or Perish hope to break out of that comfort zone with their third album, Shroud of Serpents.” Snake or swim.

Soulfly – Totem Review

Soulfly – Totem Review

“For the most part, I enjoy Soulfly. Even if they rarely bring anything new to the table. I guess Soulfly and Primitive contradict that statement because Max Cavalera explored a new territory of Korny, Limp Bizkit metal. Contradicting because, while Cavalera stepped out of his comfort zone, I fucking hate those albums—even more than I hate Ferrous. Yet, when Marc Rizzo joined the ranks on 2004’s Prophecy, Cavalera and crew brought thrash, death, and inklings of Chaos A.D. and Roots back into the mix. From that point, I’ve grown accustomed to the existence of Soulfly and enjoy albums like Dark Ages, Conquer, and Enslaved. Now it’s 2022, and Rizzo is gone. What does this mean for ole Maxie?” Mad Maxie.

Reeking Aura – Blood and Bonemeal Review

Reeking Aura – Blood and Bonemeal Review

As a hippie vegan with a houseplant obsession, I know all too much about blood and bone meal. If you’ve ever bought organic fertilizer, it likely contained these horrifying but nutrient-rich byproducts of slaughterhouses. While much less objectionable, Reeking Aura’s debut Blood and Bonemeal is no less vile than its namesake. Boasting band members from Grey Skies Fallen, Artificial Brain, and Buckshot Facelift, Blood and Bonemeal harks back to the halcyon days of Autopsy and Asphyx, dishing out grimy death metal riffs across the tempo spectrum.” What’s that smell?