Canadian Metal

Liminal Shroud – All Virtues Ablaze Review

Liminal Shroud – All Virtues Ablaze Review

“I was first alerted to the upcoming release of All Virtues Ablaze, the second full-length record from Canada’s Liminal Shroud, in a social media post by Hypnotic Dirge Records. That post brought excitement, as I loved the band’s debut record, Through the False Narrows, which was a proper, pitch-black soundtrack to my 2020 Autumn. Hypnotic Dirge’s post also, however, brought sadness, as, in a rather classy fashion, it was promoting the upcoming release of All Virtues Ablaze, even though Liminal Shroud had moved labels (to the very good Willowtip) because Hypnotic Dirge is winding down its operations.” Thresholds, shrouds and bittersweet endings.

Sedimentum – Suppuration Morphogénésiaque Review

Sedimentum – Suppuration Morphogénésiaque Review

Sedimentum is a Quebecois quartet that gained underground attention with their 2019 demo. There was something particularly unhinged and delightfully filthy about the whole thing that turned a lot of heads. Now, in 2022, we have their first full-length, Morphogénésiaque. Anyone with even a passing familiarity with death metal will have an inkling of what’s coming before a single note is played. The gloriously grotesque Brad Moore cover art, the Latin-y sounding name with more than a passing resemblance to Mortiferum, the malevolent-looking band moniker, all point to a band that isn’t here to fuck around or “subvert your expectations.”” Filth farmers.

Wake – Thought Form Descent Review

Wake – Thought Form Descent Review

“I’ll let you in on a little secret. Sometimes, before I write a review, I read the ones already out there for the album in question. This is after I’ve heard the album a few times, and I do it for a few reasons, curiosity being one. Now, there are writers who solemnly proclaim, pearls fully clutched, that they would never taint their process with such unprofessionalism. I get that. But I also get that you inconstant, two-timing jilts will also read those other reviews, and I don’t like being redundant with mine. So, having read a couple reviews for Wake‘s fifth full-length Thought Form Descent, I’ve decided NOT to write an intro paragraph along the lines of “Boy howdy, these Wake bois sure do keep evolving, man alive.”” Thought form pieces.

Panzerfaust – The Suns of Perdition – Chapter III: The Astral Drain Review

Panzerfaust – The Suns of Perdition – Chapter III: The Astral Drain Review

“Canada’s Panzerfaust has been one of my favorite discoveries since joining AMG Industries, ever since I picked up the first part of The Suns of Perdition tetralogy for review back in 2019 and proceeded to underrate it. Underrating was not a problem when the second installment, Chapter II: Render unto Eden, arrived just over a year later. Indeed, that record went on to be my AOTY 2020. It is something of an understatement, therefore, to say that excitement levels were running high when I learned that promo for Chapter III: The Astral Drain had arrived.” Fanboy gushing and proper drainage.

Truent – Through the Vale of Earthly Torment Review

Truent – Through the Vale of Earthly Torment Review

“Tech death is a tough game. In the skill-leading genre even more so does the crowd appear faceless, a mathy mob of scholarly guitar solos, flatulent bass, and trigger-happy kit-meisters. To stand out in the tech realm, contemporary fan favorites Archspire combine ridiculous speeds with memorable, rap-adjacent vocals and neoclassical sweeps aplenty. Meanwhile, bands in the Psycroptic school of thought attempt groove whiplash with 270 degree riff-corners that drift into stadium-size choruses. On their debut full-length outing, the young Canadian outfit Truent shows they are fans of these two styles of tech and try to paint an identity fusing them with a little modern core sentimentality.” Arms race.

Grave Infestation – Persecution of the Living Review

Grave Infestation – Persecution of the Living Review

“There’s a very particular set of sounds one expects to hear when spinning an album by a band called Grave Infestation. You certainly don’t go in looking for polish or subtle compositional finesse. With all that fully known, I was still surprised by just how raw, nasty, and grisly the music was that hit me upon diving into Persecution of the Living. As the band’s debut offering, it’s quite the ferocious death statement, stitching together the rotting carcasses of Autopsy, Obituary, Consuming Impulse-era Pestilence, and Hellhammer. Upon this wretched rock they build their evil church, layering eerie atmospheres and coating it all in noxious, scabby murk, and the result is sub-basement tier old school death loathsome enough to curdle fresh moonshine.” Grave yourself.

Incandescence – Le Coeur de L’Homme Review

Incandescence – Le Coeur de L’Homme Review

Incandescence was formed in 2011 by Philippe Boucher (formerly of First Fragment, now permanent drummer of Beyond Creation) who handles the songwriting and instrumentation. Vocals are performed by Louis-Paul Gauvreau, who took over duties in 2018 from Francis Desrochers. Despite its background in tech-death, Incandescence plays a form of no-frills ‘deathened black metal.'” Light up the darkness with death.

Egregore – The Word of His Law Review

Egregore – The Word of His Law Review

“Now, technically, Egregore‘s full title is, ahem, The Word of His Law: An Address to Abraxas in His Time and Place, Through His Grand Viseer, Thine Pansychopompos. If that gives you any idea, this duo fuses their chaotic tunes with a shroud of supernatural haze that represents their occult nature. Punctuating aural punishment with layers of guitar, synth, and chanting, and undergirded by an unhinged aesthetic, you can expect your ears to bleed, but by, I don’t know, ghosts?” The Code of Harambe.

Mares of Thrace – The Exile Review

Mares of Thrace – The Exile Review

“Well, this came as a surprise. Shame on me for not paying closer attention to social media, but local duo Mares of Thrace have suddenly returned after a ten year hiatus with their third album, aptly titled The Exile. 2012’s The Pilgrimage was one of the first extreme metal albums I bought and liked, and then Thérèse Lanz and Stef MacKichan disappeared. Turns out they simply moved on with real life, but Lanz is back, accompanied this time around by Casey Rogers on drums and bass. For those unfamiliar with the band, they play a unique brand of metal that borrows from doom, sludge, prog, noise, and a bit more, and for two people they pack a massive punch.” Return of the Mares.