3.5

Massacre – Resurgence Review

Massacre – Resurgence Review

Massacre is a death metal band I’ve always rooted for and got very little in return for my efforts. Though one of the creators of the entire genre, they were unable to get their long-delayed From Beyond debut out until 1991. By then they’d been scooped by a ton of acts and demoted from innovators to also-rans. Though their tardy debut was awesome, the band utterly failed to follow up on its potential.” The return of the return of the death progenitors.

Kolossus – K Review

Kolossus – K Review

“As I do with all bands that have a discography, I started from the top. It was only last year that Kolossus dropped their debut record, The Line of the Border. In those forty-plus minutes, my lips would involuntarily mouth, ‘What the fuck?’ Each song is nothing like the last. Each brings something new to the plate, and none cared what came before or went after. It refused to follow the rules—it’s own or anyone else’s. And, to an extent, K is no different.” K is for Klosers.

Conjureth – Majestic Dissolve Review

Conjureth – Majestic Dissolve Review

“As October enters its final weeks, the looming threat of list season and a veritable deluge of highly anticipated releases towers menacingly above. The first of those highly anticipated releases for me happens to drop on my birthday. Conjureth, an old-school death metal trio wreaking havoc from the West Coast (California, to be more specific), released one very strong short form outburst that garnered my attention last year. Now their debut Majestic Dissolve lies throbbing and evil in my waiting grasp.” Throb rules.

Osukaru – Starbound Review

Osukaru – Starbound Review

“Alarm bells tend to ring when, after randomly picked an album for review, that album is one of several for a band you’ve never heard previously. It usually signifies a group toiling in mediocrity, never having sufficiently impressed a critical mass to start developing a reputation. In the case of Sweden’s Osukaru, I suspect it may be a consequence of their style. The target demographic of their sixth release, Starbound, stopped listening to new music in 1992 with the last good Def Leppard record, the stratification of a variety of extreme metal sub-genres and the advent of grunge as the most popular form of rock.” Star daddy.

Feral Season – Rotting Body in the Range of Light Review

Feral Season – Rotting Body in the Range of Light Review

Feral Season is a great band name, and Rotting Body in the Range of Light is an album title I can definitely get behind. It’s nice when a band is able to immediately tell you what you’re going to be in for before you’ve reached the play button, and everything about this package, from the promo text to the “black metal” label to the album art, looked promising.” Angry kitties and suspicious promises.

Trivium – In the Court of the Dragon Review

Trivium – In the Court of the Dragon Review

“I can already smell the death metal purists, like Ferrous, shitting their pants reading this review. At the same time, I can feel the metalcore chin-strappers cringing, knowing that yours truly is probably gonna shit all over this new album. The worst part is that if I didn’t have even an inkling of respect for Heafy and co., no one would get a review. But, even after I ran the yellowed Silence in the Snow through my snowblower, Roadrunner Records still sent me the In the Court of the Dragon promo personally.” Dragon, why do you cry?

Teramaze – And the Beauty They Perceive Review

Teramaze – And the Beauty They Perceive Review

“One country whose output always perks my ears up is Australia. It seems like the Aussies just know how to craft strong albums, whether it’s the catchy hard rock of Butterfly or the avant-garde insanity of Portal, music from Down Under never fails to entertain. Nowhere is this more evident than in the country’s progressive metal scene, which features such bands as Karnivool, Voyager, Dead Letter Circus, and current kings of the mountain Caligula’s Horse. All of these bands craft terrific songs featuring strong musicians, but more importantly stellar vocalists. Let’s go ahead and add Teramaze to this list now.” Hit the Tera button.

NecroticGoreBeast – Human Deviance Galore Review

NecroticGoreBeast – Human Deviance Galore Review

“I’ve officially entered October promo world. October is also my birthday month. Therefore, for the next 31 days (starting this Friday) I am only picking up promo for my favorite genre: death metal. Thankfully, there’s a ton of promising deathly tomes stacked perilously in the bin. One such tome is Canadian brutal slam punishes NecroticGoreBeast‘s sophomore album, Human Deviance Galore.” Happy Deathday!

The Answer Lies in the Black Void – Forlorn Review

The Answer Lies in the Black Void – Forlorn Review

“Who doesn’t love international cooperation? Well, I suppose we’re bound to have a few hardcore nationalists in our readership who don’t, but in our increasingly connected world, getting cozy with the neighbors can go a long way. The same goes for metal; people from all over the globe, or even just the continent, working together can result in some magical things. Case in point: newly erected international project The Answer Lies in the Black Void, which is quite a mouthful as band names go. The duo consists of Hungarian citizen Martina Horváth (Thy Catafalque) and Dutch breakcore specialist Jurgen Köhnen (Servants of the Apocalyptic Goat Rave).” Fellow metal travelers.

Unto Others – Strength Review

Unto Others – Strength Review

Unto Other’s Mana was the critical darling of 2019. It was number three on the List to End All Lists here at AMG.com and it was widely considered brilliant. So, how’s a band supposed to live up to unexpected success? Do they have the Strength to avoid the sophomore slump.