Thrash Metal

Eruption – Tellurian Rupture Review

Eruption – Tellurian Rupture Review

“The first time I listened to Eruption was with 2017’s release, Cloaks of Oblivion. That album was a fun introduction to the band’s interesting mix of Forbidden and Metal Church, with hints of Iced Earth-like vocals and aggression. The mix was pleasant, the songwriting solid, and the vocals were vastly improved from previous releases. With 2022 comes Tellurian Rupture. And once again, the band has improved every aspect of their sound.” The floor is Grier lava.

Hell Fire – Reckoning Review

Hell Fire – Reckoning Review

“I vividly remember writing the review for Hell Fire’s 2019 release Mania. I was sitting in a folding chair in my empty, about-to-be-sold house, passing the time while an HVAC person repaired my apparently damaged furnace. I sat there typing with my headphones on, letting the San Francisco band’s beautiful guitar harmonies and journeyman heavy/speed/thrash metal soothe my heart, a heart still aching from an unanticipated $2000 bill. I remember at the time thinking that I might be underrating Mania, wondering if the stress of moving wasn’t affecting my ability to be objective.” Hell bills coming due.

Barbarian – Viperface Review

Barbarian – Viperface Review

“Some metal bands progress through their career; their origins marked by unbridled energy and the rawest material of their lives, they develop to assimilate more influences and sand their edges into a smoother product. Some metal bands do not. They bluntly hammer the same music into listeners’ brains, relentlessly seeking the Riff of Power. Italy’s Barbarian put the fist in knuckle-dragging metal, battering the world with heavy music.” Red meat for meatheads.

Toxik – Dis Morta Review

Toxik – Dis Morta Review

“Founded in 1985, New York thrashers Toxik released two albums before vanishing into obscurity. 1987’s World Circus (think Anthrax meets Sanctuary) and 1989’s Think This (think Cowboys-era Pantera meets Megadeth) have enjoyed cult-classic status ever since thanks to the band’s phenomenally technical playing, insane vocals, and bizarre songwriting. The band broke up in the early 90’s and briefly reformed in 2007 and again in 2013, and is ready to unleash Toxik’s first full-length in over twenty years.” Toxik thrashculinity.

Raptore – Blackfire Review

Raptore – Blackfire Review

“Originating in Argentina, Raptore released one full-length album back in 2016 and have been relatively quiet ever since, with a contribution to a 5-way split being their only other official release. But after moving to Spain in search of the right lineup, founding guitarist and vocalist Nico Cattoni finds his project poised to unleash sophomore record Blackfire upon an unsuspecting trüe metal scene. Single “Prisoner of the Night” demonstrates Raptore’s kitchen-sink approach to writing classic heavy metal tunes by combining bits of early Ozzy with the hair metal swagger of Mötley Crüe and a bit of American power metal.” Angry birds.

Soulfly – Totem Review

Soulfly – Totem Review

“For the most part, I enjoy Soulfly. Even if they rarely bring anything new to the table. I guess Soulfly and Primitive contradict that statement because Max Cavalera explored a new territory of Korny, Limp Bizkit metal. Contradicting because, while Cavalera stepped out of his comfort zone, I fucking hate those albums—even more than I hate Ferrous. Yet, when Marc Rizzo joined the ranks on 2004’s Prophecy, Cavalera and crew brought thrash, death, and inklings of Chaos A.D. and Roots back into the mix. From that point, I’ve grown accustomed to the existence of Soulfly and enjoy albums like Dark Ages, Conquer, and Enslaved. Now it’s 2022, and Rizzo is gone. What does this mean for ole Maxie?” Mad Maxie.

Into the Obscure: Epoch of Unlight – The Continuum Hypothesis

Into the Obscure: Epoch of Unlight – The Continuum Hypothesis

“We all have our dirty metal secrets that we selfishly keep to ourselves, only sharing with a select few close to us. Or alternatively, we incessantly talk up underground gems and spread the gospel to anyone that will listen, as we cherish our slice of underground cred. Into the Obscure aims to right the wrongs and unearth the artists/albums that for whatever unjust reason didn’t get the exposure or credit they sorely deserved the first time round.” Unlight up our lives.

Battlegrave – Cavernous Depths Review

Battlegrave – Cavernous Depths Review

“Perhaps the most awesome thing about Battlegrave is the way that they combine their genre influences together. Many bands blend genres in such a way as to make it difficult to pinpoint where one ends and another begins. Not so with Battlegrave. Cavernous Depths sounds like Morbid Saint, Demolition Hammer, and Oxygen Destroyer were each run across a table saw and had their constituent parts randomly and brutally sewn together.” Snitches and death thrash fans get stitches.

Thrashera – Bastardos da Noite Review

Thrashera – Bastardos da Noite Review

For All Drunks ‘n’ Bitches (along with sophomore release, Morte Webbanger) is about as ’80s as it gets—unbridled speed, catchiness, and the filthiest production since Hellhammer. Come 2020, the band upped their game with cleaner production and a smattering of guest appearances from such outfits as Flageladör, Vulcano, and Beyond the Grave. Não Gosto! isn’t exactly a new direction for the band and, honestly, nothing new to the genre. But it’s a tighter, better-structured product than previous releases. Is Não Gosto! but a diamond in the band’s catalog, or will Bastardos da Noite dethrone it?” Bastard of puppets.