Old School Death Metal

Helslave – From the Sulphur Depths Review

Helslave – From the Sulphur Depths Review

“When life is kicking you in the arse, death is a comforting antidote. Death metal of course, I’m not that fucking morbid. My prior experience with Italy’s Helslave is minimal, however, I’ve caught up on the Italian worshippers of Swedish death in whetting my appetite for their latest platter of old school splatter. After compiling an impressive slab of ’90s inspired melodic death on debut LP, An Endless Path, Helslave channeled some old timey Stockholm goodness on 2017’s Divination EP. Returning after an extended recording gap, Helslave continue channeling the classic, buzzsawing Swedeath brand on From the Sulphur Depths.” Tastes like burning.

Altered Dead – Returned to Life Review

Altered Dead – Returned to Life Review

“After the overwhelmingly putrid scent of sweet death delighted the senses of genre enthusiasts in 2020, can death metal in 2021 piggyback off the momentum of a banner year for the genre and keep the brutality rolling in 2021 with similar levels of quality? Canada’s Altered Dead throw their bones in the ring of death on the follow-up to their self-titled debut from back in 2016.” Reanimatdead.

Skelethal – Unveiling the Threshold Review

Skelethal – Unveiling the Threshold Review

“Though a combative Al Kikuras rightfully panned the group’s debut, this sophomore record introduces a more fleshed-out Skelethal offering something beyond buzzsaw revivalism. After the departure of founding drummer/bassist Jon Whiplash, the band’s other half, Guillaume Zeller, pieced Skelethal back together at twice the size.” Bone collecting.

Skeletal Remains – The Entombment of Chaos Review

Skeletal Remains – The Entombment of Chaos Review

“Old school death has bucked the dreary trend of a wretched 2020 thus far with a stellar supply of quality albums to help keep the blues away. Now the unfashionable but dependably solid Californian crew Skeletal Remains emerge from their dank and dusty crypt with their bludgeoning brand of no-frills death on latest platter of destruction, The Entombment of Chaos.” Bone entombers unite!

The Glorious Dead – Into Lifeless Shrines Review

The Glorious Dead – Into Lifeless Shrines Review

“Old school death metal never gets olde at the House of Steel. I’m a sucker for the stuff and I’m willing to give any such act a chance to show off their gnarly, aged wares. Michigan’s The Glorious Dead rolled their dead cart into town recently with the promo for full-length debut Into Lifeless Shrines, and I was there to greet them.” The Shrining.

Coffin Curse – Ceased to Be Review

Coffin Curse – Ceased to Be Review

“Australia is in the midst of a devastating bushfire crisis and severe drought, so the fun-loving summery good vibes we are accustomed to, have been undercut by widespread devastation of habitat, wildlife, property, and loss of lives. Throw in the usual trials and tribulations of life and it’s been a strange time. But as is often the case, metal is a cathartic remedy to tough times. And some good old, no-frills death metal played with ferocity and feral rawness is just what the doctor ordered.” Casket case.

Hex – God Has No Name Review

Hex – God Has No Name Review

“When I look at the cover art for the sophomore full-length, God Has No Name, by Spain’s Hex, I see a hyperbolic metal label distribution PR blurb made pictorial. ‘Riffs so heavy, so scorching, they splinter the Earth’s crust into black obsidian shard,’ it declares. Straight-faced, it adds ‘A sound so singularly malignant, it tears a hole in the very heavens above. As it rends the firmament, fire erupts from blah blah blah,’ you get the point.” Sounds of an apocalypse fading.

Corrosive – Nourished by Blood Review

Corrosive – Nourished by Blood Review

“The wider death metal scene has been on a roll, particularly with 2018’s remarkably chockablock selection of superb albums. With the stakes raised and the scene heavily crowded, jostling for attention from the often time poor but insatiably hungry hordes of death metal fans, is no doubt going to prove increasingly difficult. Corrosive aren’t in the least bit interested in reinventing the wheel.” Drowning in death.

Imprecation – Damnatio Ad Bestias Review

Imprecation – Damnatio Ad Bestias Review

“Join me, dear reader, as I travel back through the mists of time to that forgotten era known as the early 90s, when all you needed to form a death metal band was a healthy love of Satan and the letters A-T-I-O-N. Yes, back when Bart Simpson’s puckish irreverence first caused prudish parents to clutch their pearls. Back before some of the writers on this site were yet saddled with existence, but well after Steel Druhm had received his first pension check. While Tampa Bay and New York became hotbeds for the burgeoning death metal scene, Imprecation coalesced in the relative obscurity of Missouri City, TX.” Olde as death.

Electrocution – Psychonolatry Review

Electrocution – Psychonolatry Review

“Electrocution emerged from a lengthy hibernation to drop their 2014 comeback album Metaphysincarnation, recharging the batteries for contemporary times. The album was a solid update from their early roots, taking a darker, more technical turn while boasting a cleaner modern sound. Despite being impressed by Metaphysincarnation at the time, I admit to rarely revisiting the album during the past five or so years. Yet my curiosity about another Electrocution album spiked when I spotted Psychonolatry in the promo dump. Coming off a monumental year of deathly delights, can the old dogs muster a mean enough bark for their gestating third LP?” Don’t pull the plug.