In the doldrums of the late 80s metal was transitioning. There was a marked divide between the poppy, glam stuff which generated serious airplay and which kept the world’s cocaine suppliers profitable and heavier music which desired to push the genre’s boundaries further. Sheffield’s Def Leppard had fallen very comfortably into the former category with the release of 1983’s Pyromania but an unusually long break for popular music left people wondering how they would remain relevant. Worse, this gap was littered with failed producers and lost limbs as the band apparently struggled with what they wanted to be. Regaining their balance, the band doubled down on their old producer and drummer, confronted their problems and compiled their finest collection of songs. 30 years later and Hysteria still remains a stalwart for glam metal and hard rock which is why it’s the subject of today’s 570 words.

Hysteria is hair metal reduced to a fine paste. It has the girls, the melodies, the vocal harmonies, the schmaltzy lyrics AND the chest hair. It’s produced with that pleasant 80s guitar tone which was popular, plenty of synthesized effects and is buffed to a gleaming shine. There’s crystal clear separation in the mix and it was evidently written and produced for maximum accessibility and groupy-acquisition. While at the harder end of rock, Def Leppard were never oriented around riffcraft. Instead, catchy vocal harmonies and guitar-vocal syntheses are the focus. And quite right too: a number of these songs are stone-cold classics of the genre. It’s difficult to not revel in the histrionic “Love bites! Love bleeds! It’s bringing me to my knees!” from “Love Bites,” and the overtly sexual, silly swing in “Pour Some Sugar on Me” was what first drew me to the band. Most memorable is the ironically muted title track which has a chorus which can never be forgotten.

But it’s also pleasing that Def Leppard didn’t forget their rocking roots. Hysteria is substantially a hard rock album. Nowhere is this more evident than by Rick Allen ably executing his drumming duties despite severing a fucking arm. The other instrumentation boasts fat rhythms, warm bass and a classic rock sensibility in all but the most exuberant guitar passages. The groove is insanely strong on “Pour Some Sugar on Me” and the lead on “Armageddon It” is good for about 183 million head nods per minute (HNPM). It is, quite simply, a joy to hear and sends the pleasure center of my brain into overdrive within a few notes. If it weren’t so ridiculous in its sexual advances 1, I’d almost describe it as wholesome, nourishing and feel-good. It’s the sort of music with which one could introduce their kids to hard rock.

While no track here is the best ever produced by the band (that honor goes to the delightfully overwrought “Have You Ever Needed Someone so Bad?”), it is by far their best album. Sure, there are flaws. Quite a few of the tracks could easily lose a minute from their weird intros or excessive fifth choruses. The album is consequently less snappy than it could be. Indeed, it’s arguable that the front half outweighs the back for quality. But Def Leppard are English rock royalty and it’s this album which cemented that status. See past the hair and make-up and you meet the eyes of a serious band who wrote seriously good music.


Show 1 footnote

  1. “You got the peaches, I got the cream”? Really?
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  • And we’ve just crossed the Rubicon.

    • So I take it back at AMG headquarters someone really wanted to do a write up of Girls Girls Girls and it was decided that if MC gets a write up, all the hair bands get a write up.

      So we can expect Whitesnake soon?

      • Right after the complete Dokken anthology.

        • themetalyears

          Up next, the Kix retrospective.

          • Don’t close your eyes, it just might happen.

          • themetalyears

            Ho ho, I see what you did there. ALSO DAMN AND BLAST YOUR EYES IT’S IN MY HEAD NOW…

          • Nag Dammit

            Won’t make a difference if you’re in a darkened room

        • RuySan

          I’ll defend Skid Row until the day i die.

          “Slave to the grind” next please

          • We’ll remember you….

          • Ta2dlam

            Without a doubt the best hair band album of all. I throw that on every few months and listen to Sebastion keen away about kickin’ mud on wasted time.

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            If you need a fellow fighter, count me in.

        • Ta2dlam

          No one has fallen to Bullet Boys yet. Shooting preachers down is so 80’s black metal ideology.

          • “Smooth Up in Ya” was the song of a generation!

      • Grymm

        I so want to do Blue Murder’s self-titled debut.

        • “Valley of the Kings” is one of my favorite songs ever. It’s like Stargazer II: Electric Boogaloo.

          • Grymm

            That whole album (and especially that song) is such a joy to listen to. So much groove on that.

          • CarvedInStone

            I would love to hear a retrospective on that album as well. The only negative aspect I can think of about this album is that he did the lead vocals himself. Could you imagine how much better that record could’ve been with a proper vocalist?

            On one hand I’m happy that Coverdale booted Sykes out of Whitesnake because we got Blue Murder out of it. On the other hand Sykes and Coverdale could’ve done soooo much more together if they would’ve been able to keep their egos in check.

          • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

            That sounds so bad I have to listen to it.

        • Bas

          Yes!!!!!!

        • John Sykes is Lord.

          I was privileged to see him on the Slide It In tour in 1984. Armored Saint was there too. Good times.

      • Ultimate sceptic

        70s and early 80s Whitesnake is Masterful with a capital ‘m’.

  • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

    Holy Shit! Def Leppard on AMG! Holy Shit!

    • Shelter in place.

      • DrewMusic

        Straight to alarm red? It’s like you’re trying to instill a sense of hysteria.

        • We have to destroy to rebuild.

          • DrewMusic

            Now, if I didn’t know any better, I might think you were warning of impending Armageddon.

          • Booo-urns!

          • DrewMusic

            Don’t push me, I have but the faintest grasp on my pyromania, and I’m not above bringing this reference train to instructions on where to deliver my sucrose.

    • Oscar Albretsen

      Well, I’m in full support because I’m way bigger on 80’s metal than about 90% of the metal that’s getting released these days. It was all generic then, and it’s less cheesy now, but still just as generic, but I prefer that old stuff because it’s so much more catchy.

  • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

    I just realized that Hysteria’s cover is like a better, older version of Hardwired to Self Destruct.

    • El_Cuervo

      I realised this recently. Metallica are attempting to grasp the greatness of the 80s so hard that they missed their own music.

      • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

        You are so right with this statement that it makes me wanna cry.

    • Ultimate sceptic

      I think they’ve both got a Bacon influence.

      • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

        You’re not talking about the foodstuff, right? Because everything is better with bacon.

  • mtlman1990

    What is going on.

  • antitayyip

    never heard about them…

  • Wilhelm

    High n Dry is certainly full of riffcraft, and their best material. Hysteria is actually not a bad album though, it has maybe received an overload of denunciation due to the horrid Sugar and the sappy crappy love bites. The rest of the tracks are solid 80s rock, hard and melodic, catchy and well produced. Woman, rocket, hysteria are all great songs.

  • antitayyip

    that track reminded me: Love is a crime-Lizzy Borden

  • sir_c

    1987 called. they want their ROTM back

  • Akerblogger

    Wait, Steel rejected my request to re-review Generation Swine by Motley Crue but lets this through!? This is a TRAVESTY! I demand justice! http://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e6f6c90d20512d5b80bfb1df03de99d05b066eb93a9a7e0d22b2214d7d9363ec.jpg

    I’ve never actually listened to Def Leppard outside of that song about pouring sugar over me – maybe today is the day that all changes, thank you El Cuervo.

    • It’s a seniority thing. Consult your AMG Handbook.

      • Akerblogger

        I’ve stepped out of line. Sorry sir. Back to the factory floor I trudge.

        • Hulksteraus

          No, It’s worse, it is over to the Dungeon ov Steel for you… He has some new bands aping Manowar, Helloween and Jorn for you to review… All with cover art consisting of dragons, barbarians and viking hordes…

    • mtlman1990

      I forgot about that abomination.

    • Wilhelm

      This album sucks ass

  • mtlman1990

    That band photo… Steve Clark looks Dave Mustane and Axl Rose had a kid.

  • Huck N’ Roll

    The poster child for over-produced schmaltz. But still a ton of fun for us olde guys to blast every now and then. Nice job, El Cuervo!

    • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

      Over-produced schmaltz? You make it sound like the guy who produced this would go on to produce Shania Twain or something!

      • Matt Vogt

        BTW, if you ever want to be impressed by someone’s ability to sit in a studio and churn out *insert adjective here* pop music, sit down and listen to Shania Twain’s “Come On Over”. It really is a tour de force of a certain kind of talent.

        With Def Leppard, there’s always the conflict between how polished they sound and how tough you want them to really be, but with Shania you can forego the cognitive dissonance and just bask in the shine…

        • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

          Mmm well… that don’t impress me much.

      • Huck N’ Roll

        He did more than produce Shania Twain, and for that he earns my respect.

  • Grymm

    HA HAAAAA!!! YOU ARMAGEDDONED IT!!!

    *crickets*

    Okay, that was a shitty joke. Great write-up, though!

    • DrewMusic

      The jokes are there, they’re just out of touch, out of reach.
      You could try to get closer.
      CAN’T STOP THIS FIRE!

  • Marc Rikmenspoel

    Hysteria is good pop music, but lousy hard rock. One of you guys should YMIO High’n’Dry. Pete Willis left during the recording of Pyromania and the band was never the same. Here’s a scary thought, Willis was the raging alcoholic they cast off. They kept the less out-of-control one, Clarke. Willis, thankfully, recovered once he was away from the Rock lifestyle. RIP to Steamin’ Steve…

    • SelfIndulgence

      Agreed. High n Dry is the only thing I enjoy from them today (and I saw them live for the Pyromania tour). Shame about Willis.
      As for Hysteria….Sweet did it better.

    • FelixtheMetalcat

      Dead on comment. I still enjoy the first 3 albums alot to this day with High n Dry being my favorite.

      • Marc Rikmenspoel

        Willis was replaced by Phil Collen. While I don’t like his writing or playing, I do give him credit that he looked at Willis and Clarke, and recognized he too was becoming an alcoholic. He had the strength to confront his demons and quit drinking.

  • When I was a child I thought instead of “pour some sugar on me” they were saying “poison sugar cone of love.” I thought they were weird.

    • sir_c

      especially if you combine the two it gets awkward. Which reminds me of the epic line in the Army Of Darkness movie “Gimme some sugar baby”…

    • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

      You thought they were saying “poison sugar cone of love” and you thought they were weird? You were weird!

    • Carl Anderson

      I’m now doomed to be disappointed until someone writes a “Poison Sugar Cone of Love” song. Probably Audrey Horne could knock that one home. :)

  • Bas

    Great review. I always hated the album though..

    • Hear, hear!

      • Ultimate sceptic

        No, it’s a masterpiece.

    • [not a Dr]

      Yer Indefensible Position Is Olde?

  • Matt slatz

    My buddy Stuart demands a YMIO on winger!!!

  • Ferrous Beuller

    Great review, you POSEUR.

  • JJ

    Defended on Angry Metal Guy…not a single riff on the entire goddamn album.

    • Dark days.

    • El_Cuervo

      Pour Some Suger on Me? Armageddon It? Tell me those aren’t GREAT riffs.

      • Armageddon It straight ripped Marc Bolan. Decent enough song though.

  • Midlife Chris

    This was the first “metal” shirt I ever owned. I remember it had a picture of Joe Elliot surfing through the galaxy on the front, and the back had a busty robotic teacher explaining what the acronym W.O.M.E.N. meant (we obey men’s every need). Take that 6th grade girl sitting behind me!

    • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

      Sounds like a shirt I’d buy back then. Sounds like a shirt I’d buy right now.

  • Oscar Albretsen

    I actually ordered it on Amazon a few days ago. $5 brand new!

  • LExpoZiod

    Def Leppard on AMG?! What next? Poison? Warrant? Fuckin’ Whitesnake?!

    But seriously. This band sucks. I was subjected to enough shitty hair metal as a child to make my stomach turn every time I hear any. There’s something about the sound of the genre that just pisses me off and I will never quite know what it is. I couldn’t even make it through the embedded track.

    • Whitesnake was awesome before the whole Steve Vai/Big Hair album that was Slip of the Tongue. How durst thou lump them in with Poison and Warrant. Their pre-hairtrends output was outstanding and Coverdale was already a legend from fronting Mk III and IV Deep Purple.

      Check yourself :P

      • LExpoZiod

        Hah! My experience with the band is limited to the “Greatest Rock Hits of the 80’s” compilations that my neighbour use to blast at FULL. FUCKING. VOLUME. 24/7. So forgive me if my knowledge of the Whitesnake oeuvre isn’t what it should be.

      • Wilhelm

        SotT – big hair album? I actually felt like they were getting over the 1987 sound a bit back to their hard rock roots – Judgement day, Sailing Ships, Fool for your Loving were all great tracks.

        • Some of the songs were excellent on SotT but I felt Vai’s style was a terrible fit…even for the “big hair” ‘snake. Not being disrespectful to him at all. I thought he was a fantastic answer to EVH on the first two DLR solo LPs.

          • CarvedInStone

            I wonder what SotT would’ve sounded like if Adrian Vandenberg never got injured and was able to record the album. I enjoy the album as it is but I can understand why people felt that it was not as good as 1987 and that vai was a terrible fit.

            It also would’ve been interesting to see what a Whitesnake album with Warren DeMartini would’ve sounded like if he would’ve stuck around after the best-off tour and recorded with them. .

      • Daniel Ritson

        I’ll take it a step further: please don’t lump Warrant in with Poison. Warrant, particulalry AFTER Cherry Pie, put out some fantastic music. Jani Lane is one of the most underrated singers in hard rock history. A shame he was such a damn mess.

  • I remember liking this album a bit then even though it was a drastic departure from the first three. It hasn’t aged well with me for a few reasons. Still blast Pyromania like it’s pheckin’1984 though.

  • Thorbjørn Thaarup

    Thank you for reviewing this album. I love, love, love it. It was a great moment for me when I three years ago finally had the chance to go to Sheffield and take a selfie at the city’s walk of fame. Def Leppard’s star shone through the years back to the early 90’s when I loved the band and all my friends were into grunge. Fuck grunge.

    • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

      Hell yes, fuck grunge.

      • Nag Dammit

        Nope. Grunge was my hair metal – I’m a bit too young to claim that I was into anything other than you could be mine, and that was because I’d seen T2. Nirvana, STP, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains (are the last two even grunge?) and pot led me to Kyuss, Butthole Surfers and Monster Magnet. Then I heard Corrosion of Conformity”s deliverance and I started to sample the likes of Pantera, Fear Factory and White Zombie. Then Down came along and things got a bit darker from there. Up until then I thought thrash / anything with fast lead guitars was for wankers. Soon changed my mind on that when I saw Slayer play Reign in Blood at the Astoria. Then it was onto Opeth and there we are.

        • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

          When grunge came along I was starting to get into Thrash Metal, so it was like Testament, Exodus and Metallica on one side and grunge on the other. I chose Thrash, which led to Death Metal and Black Metal.
          Also, there’s the nostalgia factor and I kind of side with the “Grunge killed Hair Metal, fuck grunge” camp.

          • Nag Dammit

            No argument there. Grunge was the antithesis of hair metal and mocked it for it’s posturing and poseurness. The unfortunate thing was loads of actually talented metal bands got tarred with the same brush and people started to actively shun any band that dared to revel in excess, whether that be hair or musicianship. I was one of them and whilst I regret it now because I closed my mind to so much great music, I can’t say fuck grunge because that would be hypocritical.

    • LExpoZiod

      Hey! Whats yer beef with grunge?

  • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

    Before I turned into the Metalest of the Metal Guys I am now, I got into Metal by listening to Hard Rock and Hair Metal. Stuff like Warrant, Motley Crue, Poison, Bon Jovi. Which led to Guns N Roses, which led to AC/DC, which led to Deep Purple, which led to Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Metallica, Manowar… it took me a while to get into Death Metal, but Morbid Angel’s Covenant got the job done.
    So even now I have the fondest memories and the greatest respect for some of this stuff that gets lambasted by others. I FUCKING love Motley Crue’s “Doctor Feelgood” and every Motley Crue album from their debut to Dr Feelgood. I love Warrant’s Cherry Pie. Cinderella’s “Heartbreak Station”.
    So I am all for AMG doing retrospectives on stuff like this.

    • Wilhelm

      Same here man, well except that I hate Motley Crue now lol…I grew up with Poison, Def Leppard, Whitesnake, Bon Jovi, Kix, etc. that was safe music my parents would mostly let me listen to, a few years later Master of Puppets drove me straight to the darkness and deeper down was Emperor, Morbid Angel, My Dying Bride, etc. the hair days were fun though.

      • By-tor

        A lot of the people that pan the hard rock and hair bands from the 80’s because they’re not m/etal don’t understand that this is as heavy as it got in some places back then. There was no Morbid Angel or Cannibal Corpse in the Bible Belt. You might get lucky and score a Maiden album, maybe sneak a Metallica cassette past mom, but that’s about it. You were guaranteed to see Def Leppard and the like on Dial MTV because they were safe as you said. And for most of us of a certain vintage, these bands were the gateway drug that led to Opeth, Bolt Thrower, Carcass….

        Looking back, I don’t think any of the albums from that time are great, but I’ll always have a soft spot for Hysteria, Slippery When Wet, Appetite for Destruction, Open up and Say Ahhh…etc. I think all of those have aged better than any grunge album too.

        • GardensTale

          Appetite for Destruction was pretty gnarly compared to most hair metal at the time though.

          • By-tor

            Definitely the best album of the bunch. Still holds up too IMO.

        • Reese Burns

          I’d say Bon Jovi is still pretty great. Other than that though, spot on.

        • Wilhelm

          You could sneak and somehow listen to Bathory, Mercyful Fate and Venom, but those were the dark arts and if Mom ever found out, not only would the evil be destroyed but your ass would be grounded for the summer – we lived as rebels even listening to the hair bands!

        • Norfair Legend

          Morbid Angel came around with Entombed and Unleashed for the Altars of Madness tour and I bought tickets from our usual Ticketmaster in Carson Pirie Scott’s.

          I said “two for Morbid Angel please,” she replied, “oh, is that some sort of religious event?” I returned, “yes, ma’am, it sure is.”

    • JJnetZach

      I was going to bash you for this but then I realized that what got me into metal was Nightwish and Sonata Arctica. So, uh, I’m out.

    • manimal

      I took a completely different road. It started with Nick Cave in primary school. My mother was unimpressed…

    • NeoTheOne

      Yeah, I was going to bash you as well, but I have to admit, that is what I grew up listening to. Today is a different story, and I cringe at most of the stuff from the 80’s, but then, it depends on my mood at the time, as I will from time to time listen to some of it. Also, I will always have a soft spot for Vinnie Vincent’s Invasion (Vinnie could shred with the best of them), and Britny Fox (their third album with Tommy Paris is the best) had some really good hooks and choruses. Poison and Cinderella are just way too much cheese for me though, but then, to each their own. People are quick to dismiss 80’s hair metal, but…the guys could really play. Steve Vai looks silly when he was in David Lee Roth’s band, but you’d be hard pressed to find a more talented guitarist on the planet. Bon Jovi are the American version of Def Leppard, and IMO, both are becoming the rock/metal equivalent to Rod Stewart as they age. One thing I will finish though, is that to be relevant, you need to be able to play more than just your hits from 30 years ago…otherwise you’re just a nostalgia act, analogous to a cover band.

      • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

        A cover band covering itself from 30 yaers ago.

        • [not a Dr]

          Which can be awesome, if no one plays the same instrument they played in the original version.

  • Kenny Achenbach

    Def Leppard is the greatest band that ever took the stage. I or we who where there, know it. Come on. This guy that wrote this article is probably only in his or her 20s. I wish they had real music like we did. Who do they call the thunder God, or the terror twins. That’s right. Def leppard. Still rocking

  • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

    You guys should do a especial article reviewing and ranking every Black Sabbath album WITHOUT Ozzy and/or Dio. Like a Best of the Rest thing.

    • Innit Bartender

      Seconded. Who would win? Eternal Idol? Cross Purposes?

      • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

        I know quite a few persons whose ALL TIME favorite Black Sabbath album is Born Again. I swear it’s true.

        • Innit Bartender

          IMHO, the heaviest-sounding Black Sabbath album together with Dehumanizer. Definitely a good one.

      • Headless Cross!
        Born Again would rank high on my list as well.

        • Innit Bartender

          I love Headless Cross but deep down I think there’s just ONE excellent song on it (Nightwing), some good songs and some clunkers (Kill in the Spirit World). I’ve always held Cross Purposes higher because of sheer better songwriting – and because Geezer’s on it – the two things go hand in hand.

  • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

    It would be nice to get some Hysteria sidebars to replace the sweaty back guy.

    • Berit Dogg

      I like sweaty back guy, but hey, bring on hairy chest makeup guy any time!

  • Lee

    Btw am I the only one who hears a distinct similarity between Pour Some Sugar and Shania Twain’s Honey, I’m Home in the rythym of the verses? Always felt that Mutt lifted that from Leppard and gave his “honey” another sure hit. Don’t blame him tho lol

    • Juan Manuel Pinto Guerra

      Well, he’s got co-writting credits on both songs…

  • Carl Anderson

    I confess that I totally dug this as a pimply teen in the ‘burbs — when and where there were not that many to find out what else was going on other than MTV and maybe a somewhat limp rock radio station. But, hey, it led to Pyromania and High’n’Dry (which is still cool, IMO) and thence to NWoBHM and eternal damnation. So: all right, then! :D

  • The Unicorn

    My god, the days of turning the cover of my Trapper Keeper inside out and scrawling Def Leppard logos on the cardboard with my 4-color spring-action Bic pen. Heading home, spinning vinyl on my shitty little record player, air guitaring in front of the mirror, and beating off like mad to stolen copies of Hustler on the toilet while mom cooked dinner without a clue of what was happening to her wee lad. Thanks for the nostalgia my friend. We are fucking OLD as dust!

    • [not a Dr]

      Beating off the Spitting Unicorn?

    • Berit Dogg

      Oh, she knew.

      • Hulksteraus

        They all know…

      • DrewMusic

        The things that mothers/women in general largely opt never to acknowledge or speak of must make a long and dark list, indeed.

    • FelixtheMetalcat

      Oh my God, I just spit out my morning coffee laughing at that analogy. How fucking funny and thank you!

  • This was an album that I pretended not to like because it was soooo popular at the time. I didn’t think it was cool to enjoy such fluff. What I didn’t realize was that my attraction was the sheer strength of the songs. Hard to argue on most of the tracks. Sure, “Excitable” sounds about as dated as the day it was released but I believe it also contains the most progressive Def Leppard track (well, progressive for them anyway). “Gods of War”, anyone? Lame lyrics but I love that song.

  • BernBern17

    hard rock is so important to metal. Without the quality Aussie pub rock of the 80s my dad listened to there would be no chance I’d be listening to metal at the moment. Bands like acdc, the Angels, rose tattoo and cold chisel I listened to in my dads car growing up influenced my music choices so much.

  • FelixtheMetalcat

    I suppose it all depends which side of the Def Leppard camp ya fall on as to what you think of this album. I hated it then and find it to be utter shit today. I knew after Pyromania had that glossy feel to it that the bad had radically changed. I loved Pyromania but will still regard High n Dry as their best, the rawness and attitude of a hungry band on full display. The loss of Pete Willis was very evident and after the death of Steve Clark, the songwriting tanked even further.

  • Jozo90

    This album contains Run Riot, wich is one of my absolute favourite songs of all time. It just gets me pumped up immediately every time i hear it!

  • iiixf

    Y NO Van Halen, or Thin Lizzy, speaking of the classics.

  • iiixf

    also, this review opens the possibility to move Cold Lake from Indefensible Positions to the YMIO category…

  • Martin L

    This was Def Leppard’s equivalent of Metallica’s Black album: an overproduced and soulless album by a band that was on the decline creatively but perhaps at its peak as far as stature and momentum.

    Extremely talented veterans like that were able to kill it in the mainstream.

    The template for Hysteria was Judas Priest’s Turbo. A similar but much, much better venture. Same kind of lush sound and eerie, ultra-modern atmosphere. But unlike Hysteria, Turbo actually has tons of interesting riffs, all the catchiness and is much more fun thanks to having one of the best singer and guitar duo of all times.

    • Carl Redfern

      I didn’t know Priest made two albums called Turbo.

  • FelixtheMetalcat

    Great story indeed.

  • SuzyC

    Never liked this album, and I was 19 at the time.

  • AnnieK13

    Hair metal from the Great White Lion Snake era…

  • Captain Craig MacKenzie

    87 was a banner year for hair metal, witness WS’ self-titled, PM’s Future World, Dokken’s BFTA, and perhaps the pinnacle of the genre – MSG’s Perfect Timing. But this year also marked the release of CF’s Into the Pandemonium, Voivod’s Killing Tech. and King Diamond’s Abigail. Compared to these, DL is Olde but it is not metal. In 1987, my sister was listening to Once Bitten Twice Shy, Crazy Crazy Nights, and Dude Looks Like a Lady. I was listening to Just Coz You Got the Power, Eternal Idol, & Run to the Light. My sister rocked, but she was not metal.

  • Lee

    Totally agree with Felix. Pyromania was the last one I enjoyed. One of the first albums I ever bought was On Through the Night. Still spin it. High and Dry killed it. Absolutely awesome. Those were a few great years. Fire Down Under. Slide it in. Coney Hatch. British Steel. Hell, even Metal Health. Screaming all that shit at the top of your lungs while passing the bottle. Hey, even the cops were cool then.

  • Jeff Kent

    I missed seeing Def Leppard on the Pyromania tour, but saw them in the round for Hysteria (with a brilliant opening set from Queensryche). I have a soft spot for Pyromania and found this to be TOO slick and TOO produced. Looking back at Joe’s comments about never being a metal band, this surely cemented their foray into the pop World.