Felagund

Steel Bearing Hand – Slay in Hell Review

Steel Bearing Hand – Slay in Hell Review

“It was the band’s logo that did it. Skulking around the promo bin like a slightly more disheveled Grima Wormtongue, I noticed this monstrosity right away. Take a closer look and you’ll see everything that makes metal metal: “Steel” written out with trve 80s flair (the ‘S’ is actually a steel bearing hand, guys!) nestled atop a more grotesque “Bearing Hand”, contorted, razor-sharp and deadly, book-ended by the ubiquitous devil horns. It’s the perfect statement for a self-proclaimed death/thrash group eager to meld genres and melt faces. Coupled with intricate, black-and-white cover art that calls to mind the barbaric and fiercely fun LIK, I was eager to see what this Texas foursome with only one other full-length under their bullet-studded belt was all about.” Steel hands and slay rides.

Dipygus – Bushmeat Review

Dipygus – Bushmeat Review

“A strong concept can get you far. Even a challenging listen can be improved by a powerful concept that resonates. Enter the evocatively titled Bushmeat, the sophomore effort from Dipygus, an outfit hailing from Santa Cruz, California who produce a particularly gamey hybrid of death metal and grindcore. This hideous quartet are eager to infuse Bushmeat with their own vile take on 1970s exploitation jungle horror. With one banned album under their belts and a penchant for irredeemable jungle horror, does Dipygus‘ aim to get by on concept alone, or do they have the chops to pull off a carnal marriage between theme and execution?” Jungle rot.

Coexistence – Collateral Dimension Review

Coexistence – Collateral Dimension Review

“Technical death metal can be a fickle mistress. She can lure you away with promises of sublime virtuosity, only to bombard you with a cacophony of disjoined solos. She can entice you with the siren song of a bold sci-fi concept album, only to present you with a sub-standard Spawn of Possession clone. Despite this, there’s a lot of great tech death out there, but you have to be willing to separate the 8-string wheat from the 7-string chaff. So where does Coexistence fit in with their debut album Collateral Dimension?” All tech, no peace.

Miasmal Sabbath – Ominous Radiance Review

Miasmal Sabbath – Ominous Radiance Review

“Ah, long songs. They’re bitterly divisive and can (like most things in this genre) evoke strong emotions. Perhaps it’s because there are so many forms they can take. There’s early prog metal in the vein of Rush‘s 2112, using shorter songs that make up an extended, conceptual track. There’s the Firelink approach, melding explosive passages with slower interludes, resulting in longer tracks that sustain interest through variety. There’s also the road taken by bands like Sleep, crafting dense, slower jams that create atmosphere while pummeling you with riff after smoky riff. So which road does death metal power trio Miasmal Sabbath take on their debut full-length Ominous Radiance?” Come, come, endure the Sabbath.

Hark From The Tomb – Let Them Die Review

Hark From The Tomb – Let Them Die Review

“Unlike most other genres, metal has made hating humanity a part of its quirky charm. Black metal in particular has turned the distaste for all things carbon-based into a truly terrifying art form. It’s no surprise then that Hark From the Tomb, an anonymous Swedish duo who play a prehistoric form of old school black metal, was formed solely to express their shared disgust for their fellow bipedal lifeforms.” Hark, the hateful angels sing.

Dark Rites – The Dark Hymns Review

Dark Rites – The Dark Hymns Review

“I’m what you’d call an ardent defender of the death metal faith. But amidst my desire for music heavier than a neutron star, I’m also a sucker for melody – a firm believer in the power of a solid hook and even a mighty chorus or two. Enter The Dark Hymns, the third album from Dark Rites, a self-described “unrelenting” melodic death metal band “with an old school vibe.” With members hailing from the U.S. and U.K., my interest was piqued.” Dark as rite.