Doom_et_Al

Murdryck – Födelsen Review

Murdryck – Födelsen Review

“’The first draft of almost everything you produce is shit. And the second draft is usually also shit. But you never wind up with anything worthwhile without producing those early drafts.’ A wise supervisor once told me these words, and she was right. Whether a terrified n00b trying to avoid the perils of the AMG Skull Pit, or attempting a complicated academic research paper, the early stages of anything worthwhile are often about finding your identity and your voice. That process can be messy and unglamorous, but it’s how anything great gets made.” Revise, Mutherf_ _ _ _ _!

Vargrav – Reign in Supreme Darkness Review

Vargrav – Reign in Supreme Darkness Review

“Remember anything substantial about Gus van Sant’s shot-for-shot remake of the Hitchcock’s classic, Pyscho? Me neither. If you’re going to copy or reboot something, you need to bring something new to the table. In 20 years’ time, people will still be watching Predator, Point Break, and Total Recall. No one will be wasting time with the pointless and forgettable reboots. Before I get banished to yet another extra latrine shift by my slave-driving editor, while he mumbles something about this ‘Not being Angry Movie Guy,’ allow me to explain.” Reboots, man.

Ellende – Lebensnehmer Review

Ellende – Lebensnehmer Review

“I love it when cover art tells you all you need to know about an album’s themes. Look at that skeleton — he’s clearly in the middle of a battle. So this will be a furious riposte to the notion of the glory of war, right? A blast of anger like Marduk or 1914, perhaps? But peer closer: he’s settled mournfully next to a fallen comrade, arm placed tenderly on his chest, a look of weariness and loss etched on his skeletal visage. Head up, he stares forlornly at the horrors that lie ahead. The theme of Ellende’s Lebensnehmer (“Life-Taker”), then, is less the fury and horror of war, and more the melancholy, pain, and loss that accompanies it.” Survivor’s remorse.

Imperia – Flames of Eternity Review

Imperia – Flames of Eternity Review

“Any magician will tell you that the key to most tricks is misdirection: draw the audience’s eyes away from where they should be looking by any means possible. While their attention is averted, the sleight-of-hand takes place. What separates the greats from, say, Magician Bob at your niece’s third birthday party, is the seamlessness with which this technique is performed. Or to put it bluntly, if you notice that you’re being distracted, they’re doing it wrong.” Oh, this bodes well…

Rifftera – Across the Acheron Review

Rifftera – Across the Acheron Review

“From a metal perspective, 2019 has been decidedly underwhelming so far. When the promo bin threw me a melo-death album by a band whose name sounds like an adolescent parody of iconic metal giants, I had little hope that things would improve. This sophomore effort by Finnish band Rifftera follows 2015’s Pitch Black; a self-produced smorgasbord of melodic death metal, thrash, power and prog, smashed together with the grace of a junkyard compactor, and then played with the dial at 11. It was fun, but it was a mess.” Have these Finnish melodeath-thrashers gotten their shit together?

Misotheist – Misotheist Review

Misotheist – Misotheist Review

“At its cold heart, black metal is supposed to be angry, dangerous, uncomfortable. And while the genre has broadened to include some generally more benign (and often very enjoyable) off-shoots of the originally evil vision, Misotheist, hailing from Trondheim in Norway, have arrived to remind us of how dark and malevolent black metal can be. The band, whose name means “Hatred of God,” combine the blasphemy of Batushka with the frozen hellscapes of Havukruunu, sprinkled with some dissonant elements of Deathspell Omega. Anonymous members playing evil music in black cloaks emphasize that the lush landscapes of some recent atmoblack albums are as absent as warmth on a Scandinavian midwinter day.” Miso thorny.

Hex A.D. – Netherworld Triumphant Review

Hex A.D. – Netherworld Triumphant Review

“It’s a great time to be a doom fan. It feels like the genre is going through a burst of creativity at the moment. Bands who are failing to keep up, however, can find themselves left by the wayside. Hex A.D. is a quartet hailing from Norway, and their first two albums, Even the Savage Will See Fair Play and The Last Nail in the Coffin Lid consisted of fairly run-o’-the-mill sludgy, stoner doom. Nothing wrong with that, of course, but there was little to distinguish them from many of their peers. Their latest effort would have to offer something tastier than their previous platters to distract me from the doom buffet of 2018.” Take all you want, but eat all you take.