Colombian Metal

No Raza – Transcending Material Sins Review

No Raza – Transcending Material Sins Review

“The moral of the story is that, even at ass-o’-clock in the morning, Colombian death metal quartet No Raza were able to keep not only themselves, but also their audience, awake and fairly hyped for an hour and twenty minutes. That’s nearly twice the span they had allotted. So you can bet your bottom dollar I was going to snag promo for their fourth and latest outing, Transcending Material Sins.” MOOAR Raza.

Lucifera – La Caceria De Brujas Review

Lucifera – La Caceria De Brujas Review

“My old computer science teacher once told our class that he liked Baja Blast Mountain Dew so much, he wished he could stick an IV in his arm and take it intravenously. Interestingly enough, that’s exactly the way I feel about blackened thrash metal. To me it’s like a drug: I don’t just want it, I fucking need it. It seems each continent produces its own unique strain and while I like Australia’s best, in recent years I’ve also come to enjoy the raw and uncompromising approach of South American bands like Invocation Spells and Witchtrap. Colombian duo Lucifera embody this same ethos.” Pick your poison.

Witchtrap – Trap the Witch Review

Witchtrap – Trap the Witch Review

“Look at that album title. Look at that art. Now that is a gimmick! Forgive my exuberance, but after only just overcoming the trauma-induced tinnitus from my previous attempts at thrash, Witchtrap prove that good things come to those who scour the promo sheet with a fine-toothed comb.” Nasty things come to those who dumpster dive.

Internal Suffering – Cyclonic Void of Power Review

Internal Suffering – Cyclonic Void of Power Review

“Don’t be surprised if this is the first you’ve seen of an album from Internal Suffering. The long-running Colombian brutal death metal band has been silent for the past ten years, shuffling from city to city without releasing so much as an EP. And I’m fine with that, seeing as much of their previous output was not to my liking. 2006’s Awakening of the Rebel was naught but a smear of blast beats to me, and the continuous aggression of their music largely defeated itself. Cyclonic Void of Power, however, is a step in the right direction.” Is this the dawn of Vagabond metal?

Nepente – I Will Get Your Soul Review

Nepente – I Will Get Your Soul Review

“The first thing that came to mind when this death metal Colombian necktie of an EP came across my radar is the similarly-titled 2007 King Diamond album, Give Me Your Soul…Please. Like every King release of the past few decades, a disappointing slab that folks bolstered up higher than they should have because we all love King so damn much.” But is this a diamond in the rough?

Cóndor – Duin Review

Cóndor – Duin Review

“If there’s anything that can be gleamed about the giant web that is the world of heavy metal, it’s that you can always draw influence from outside of the genre’s comfort zone to provide a fresh flavor to the oftentimes stagnant scene. Whether it’s pulling from other sounds beyond metal, bringing in a new philosophical or religious slant, or simply injecting your culture into your sound, it’s pretty much guaranteed that, good or bad, you will be remembered.” Is Condor ready to be remembered?

Things You Might Have Missed 2013: Cóndor – Nadia

Things You Might Have Missed 2013: Cóndor – Nadia

“At first glance, this band’s name looks like that of a typical thrash metal band. This definitely has to do with my learning of a fairly unknown Norwegian thrash metal band with a nearly identical name a few months ago. But even then, just look at the form of the word “Cóndor” – two syllables, starts with ‘C’ and ends with ‘r’, and a mere six alphabets in total. This word simply has great potential to be crafted into a pointy, symmetrical logo with polish effect in the style of, say, Havok’s logo. Stereotypes, however, aren’t always accurate.” Happy Metal Guy is easily confused by band names and stereotypes, but he overcomes these disabilities to clue you in on some good doom/death you may have missed.

Inquisition – Obscure Verses for the Multiverse Review

Inquisition – Obscure Verses for the Multiverse Review

Inquisition might be the greatest black metal band on Earth. But they weren’t always gunning for that title. In fact, they’ve taken a long, unlikely path to the upper echelon. Guitarist / froghammer Dagon thrashspawned the band in Colombia back in ’89 before relocating Stateside in ’96, where he linked up with drummer / hellmachine Incubus. The duo released their debut, Into the Infernal Regions of the Ancient Cult, in 1998. Then, they quickly settled into a rut of obscurity for the better part of the decade, releasing three albums to a small-but-devoted cabal of black metal weirdos. They did okay for themselves, assuredly, but there were a handful of hurdles preventing Inquisition from reaching a wider audience…” Are you a black metal weirdo or aspire to be one? Want to know what hurdles were holding these guys back from the big leagues? Jordan Campbell has all the answers.