20 Buck Spin

Black Magnet – Body Prophesy Review

Black Magnet – Body Prophesy Review

“Industrial metal is an extremely difficult genre in which to stand out. Part of this challenge lies in the relatively limiting set of attributes that defines the style. A lot of industrial music relies on robotic, crushing synth tones, backed by throbbing beats with gritty distortion slathered over almost everything from drums to vocals. The specific niche that industrial music fills in turn creates an incredibly crowded and competitive field for new artists intending to make their mark. To stand out, you have to deliver something that breaks new ground in either sound or songwriting quality. Oklahoma City-based one-man-band Black Magnet aim to do just that with their new album, Body Prophesy.” Body hammer.

Mournful Congregation – The Exuviae of Gods – Part I Review

Mournful Congregation – The Exuviae of Gods – Part I Review

“Every now and then, while minding my little ol’ business as I knock shit off my dresser like a good cat, the random thought of “Hey, whatever happened to such-and-such band” will pop into my furry cranium and, like clockwork, that band will release something new almost immediately afterward. In this case, said band is Australian funeral powerhouse Mournful Congregation, a band that doesn’t always drop new things at a constant rate, but when they do drop those new things, they’re always heavy, reflective, and… well, mournful.” Short mourning.

Predatory Light – Death and the Twilight Hours Review

Predatory Light – Death and the Twilight Hours Review

“Kyle Morgan gets around. The versatile guitar player features in Ash Borer, Superstition, Vanum and, most relevant here, Predatory Light. What stands out about each of the first three projects is the unique sound they bring to their respective sub-genres; whether the cavernous malevolence of The Irrespassable Gate, or the passionate intensity of Ageless Fire, there is a cutting edge to separate them from pretenders. So the somewhat milquetoast first album from Predatory Light, 2016’s Predatory Light, came as a bit of a surprise. Its somewhat formulaic combination of doom and black metal caught Mark Z. on a good day, but even he felt more innovation was required. Six years later, and Predatory Light are back with Death and the Twilight Hours.” Pale horse on the plague playground.

Egregore – The Word of His Law Review

Egregore – The Word of His Law Review

“Now, technically, Egregore‘s full title is, ahem, The Word of His Law: An Address to Abraxas in His Time and Place, Through His Grand Viseer, Thine Pansychopompos. If that gives you any idea, this duo fuses their chaotic tunes with a shroud of supernatural haze that represents their occult nature. Punctuating aural punishment with layers of guitar, synth, and chanting, and undergirded by an unhinged aesthetic, you can expect your ears to bleed, but by, I don’t know, ghosts?” The Code of Harambe.

WORM – Foreverglade Review

WORM – Foreverglade Review

“Over a year and a half ago, Floridian band WORM released Gloomlord, a funeral/death doom album that marked a left turn for the former black metal outfit. I found it below average. Remarkably, my proclamation of its deficiencies wasn’t enough to keep others from enjoying it. The absolute fucking nerve. An inordinate number of other metal polymaths in the blogosphere sang its dolorous praises to the point that I wondered if maybe I had been mistaken, as rare an occurrence as that may be. When follow-up Foreverglade was announced, I decided to revisit Gloomlord, and I found it…about the same. Two good tracks and three duds. As I hit play on Foreverglade, I mentally prepared to be the bearer of bad reviews a second time.” The WORM has turned.

Atræ Bilis – Apexapien Review

Atræ Bilis – Apexapien Review

Atræ Bilis unlocked a whole other level of riff when they dropped Divinihility last year. The Canadian death troupe demolished kingdoms as far as the eye could see, razing the ground with razor-sharp riffs and songwriting tighter than the leather pants of your average hair metal frontman. That EP rocked my entire world for months on end, and I repeatedly return to it more than a year later. Today, I have in my hands the debut full-length by these chaps, entitled Apexapien.” Is MOAR always MOAR?

Ænigmatum – Deconsecrate Review

Ænigmatum – Deconsecrate Review

“I’ve had my eye on Ænigmatum for two months now. As with most things that cross my path on the river Bandcamp’s neverending stream, the colorful but still fleshy and spiny cover for the Portland, Oregon quartet’s sophomore effort Deconsecrate caught my attention—and, thankfully, so did the advance track. It was a twisty, gnarled hurricane of blackened death metal from a label I normally associate with more knuckle-dragging fare. Needless to say, Ænigmatum seemed poised to deliver something fresh in a summer that’s been remarkably dry for this sponge.” Songs for scouring.

Cerebral Rot – Excretion of Mortality Review

Cerebral Rot – Excretion of Mortality Review

“I love death metal that pushes its own boundaries but, ironically, it’s the old school that feeds my education. That disgusting urge to claw and crush that transcends all common decency and hearkens back to a time when “fully-functioning adults” didn’t learn to speak via fucking Reddit. Cerebral Rot know a little of what I’m talking about. Their primal death-breath is one I can stand to gasp any day of the week. Debut album Odious Descent into Decay hit my schedule in 2019 and, although well executed, there was noticeable room for improvement. Now, Excretion of Mortality looms large on the devolutionary chain and one thing is clear, this Seattle four-piece are out for blood.” Brains!

Wode – Burn in Many Mirrors Review

Wode – Burn in Many Mirrors Review

“I’m struggling to think of a musical genre which so obstinately refuses to go away as traditional black metal. Despite the progression of 30 years since the ‘second wave’ style was crystallized by the lonely teenagers of Norway, new bands continue to produce metal which is entirely imitative of such teens. Wode, of Manchester, joined the fray in 2016 with their self-titled debut which was an especially mean and riff-dominated example of the sound. It was a powerful, if one-dimensional, release which was bettered by its sequel called Servants of the Countercosmos which wrapped intricate leads and dynamic song-writing into a more cohesive album. 4 year later and Burn in Many Mirrors is primed for unveiling, promising yet more tales of cosmic evil.” Wode to you of earth and sea.

Gravesend – Methods of Human Disposal Review

Gravesend – Methods of Human Disposal Review

“We are touring Gravesend’s vision of (I assume) New York, in which we fall into graves and pits of human waste, where your body will be eaten by pests (the title track), discover satanic, knife-wielding meth heads dismembering nuns (“End of the Line”), and face the maddened and diseased residents of a tuberculosis sanatorium (“Unclaimed Remains”). And that’s just for starters. Now imagine these depraved tales set to the manic, explosive fury of Wormrot and Noise for Music’s Sake-era Napalm Death.” Rotten apples.