Hexvessel

The Order of Israfel – Wisdom Review

The Order of Israfel – Wisdom Review

“In a month where Pallbearer dropped an irresistible doom monstrosity on us, an unheralded act is quietly sneaking out a release that could easily slip through the cracks and escape notice unfairly. The Order of Israfel is a project put together by Tom Sutton (Church of Misery) and Patrik Andersson Winberg (Doomdogs) and their Wisdom debut is a surprisingly addictive fusion of classic Sabbathian doom, 70s hard rock, The Obsessed and the Cathedral school of mega heavy riffs.” Hey, Pallbearer isn’t the only doom crew out there. Sheesh!

Sabbath Assembly – Quaternity Review

Sabbath Assembly – Quaternity Review

“In the mood for something really different? Sabbath Assembly certainly qualifies. As explained in my review of their Ye Are Gods opus, this is a bizarre project based on the teachings of the mega-obscure Process Church of the Final Judgment; a strange apocalyptic hippie cult from the 60s that believed in a union of Christ and Satan that triggers armageddon. Led by Jamie Myers (Hammers of Misfortune, Wolves in the Throne Room) and Dave “Xtian” Nuss (ex-Angkor Wat), they craft an unusual hybrid of 60s hippie folk rock and religious hymnal music.” Need religion in your life? Feel the urge to join a Satanic cult? Here’s the one album that meets all your needs! Now with added scripture reading.

Morbus Chron – Sweven Review

Morbus Chron – Sweven Review

“The times they are a changing! If you were around for my review of Morbus Chron‘s 2011 opus Sleepers in the Rift, you know how impressed I was with their Autopsy-laden salute to early American death metal. That album was a sewage leak of nastiness and I still spin it often. Naturally, I expected more of the same with their follow up, but I didn’t get it. Not even close. That’s because Sweven (yea olde English for “visions”) is an enormous departure in style and approach, veering off into the world of proggy, tripped out weirdness, while somehow still remaining death metal.” Wow, this one really knocked Steel Druhm off his feet, and he’s notoriously difficult to knock over. You best read on.

Things You Might Have Missed 2013: Avatarium – Avatarium

Things You Might Have Missed 2013: Avatarium – Avatarium

“Some of these things “we miss” during the year are understandably obscure and I don’t lose much sleep worrying about the overall health of my Metal Detector. Sometimes however, we whiff on a biggie and are left wondering if our collective ear to the metal underground needs a hearing aid (of steel). This is one of those whiffs. That’s because Avatarium is the new project of none other than Leif Fucking Edling (Candlemass, Krux, Abstract Algebra, etc.) and since the man is one of the modern-day Lords of Doom, we clearly should have seen this coming sooner.” Oops is all we can say on this one. The classy thing to do is forgive and move on.

Windhand – Soma Review

Windhand – Soma Review

Windhand is like the next door neighbor who walks around his front yard in tidy whities whilst swigging from a can of Rheingold ®. You want to like him, but he makes it really tough. As purveyors of super fuzzed-out, monolithic stoner doom, they’re often mentioned in the same breath as Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats; likely due to the groovy, 60s/70s style vocals they utilize. However, where Uncle Acid writes relatively short, hooky doom-rock anthems, Windhand opts for huge, laboriously slow, long-winded odes to mammoth distortion similar to Electric Wizard and Dopesmoker-era Sleep.” Windhand, the cult heroes of ginormous stoner doom/drone are back to oppress the masses with the power of THE RIFF! Will Steel Druhm be oppressed? He’s always so damn anti-authority, so who knows?

Hexvessel – Iron Marsh Review

Hexvessel – Iron Marsh Review

“Things seem to come on threes, be they good, bad or some combination thereof. As proof of this cosmic law, this week has graced me with three examples of stoner/doom/retro music: Ghost, Spiritual Beggars and now Hexvessel. I hadn’t heard of this oddball, psychedelic group of Finns until their No Holier Temple album last year, and I found myself quite taken with their folksy, trippy and hypnotic take on 60s and 70s rock.” And now they’re back with an EP that tells the rest of the story! Are you ready for more Finnish forest folk? You better be!