Gothic Metal

Volturian – Crimson Review

Volturian – Crimson Review

“The brainchild of Frozen Crown‘s Federico Mondelli and Sleeping Romance‘s Federica Lanna, Volturian prioritizes fun over all. These tunes will get stuck in your head, you will kind of hate that they get stuck in your head, and you will be powerless to stop it if you give it the smallest opening.” Activate earworm lock!

The Medea Project – Sisyphus Review

The Medea Project – Sisyphus Review

“You know, I’d never really considered it before, but it’s funny gothic and doom metal are not more frequently bedfellows. After all, the two genres have a lot in common: morose atmosphere, flair for the dramatic, favored color black (alright, that last one may go for everything more extreme than power metal). And sure, there’s some big names that have wed the styles at some point in their careers, like My Dying Bride or Tiamat. But it never became a household mixture the way death thrash or prog power did. Well, The Medea Project want to make their mark with just such a sound.” Drama club.

Angry Metal Primer – My Dying Bride

Angry Metal Primer – My Dying Bride

Over 40 years of metal’s biological urge (and a hefty lack of restraint) has resulted in some incomprehensibly large catalogs. No one should have to listen to anywhere from 13 to 15 [Luca Turilli’s] Rhapsody [of Fire] albums just to get caught up for a new release. So each week (as required and/or able), we’re offering a selection of prime(r)(er) cuts to get you up to speed. Without further ado, welcome to My Dying Bride‘s Primer of Sadness.

Frayle – 1692 Review

Frayle – 1692 Review

“Ages passed since Cleveland’s Frayle released their debut goth/doom tome-let The White Witch. Evocative of the deep yet as tempting as the light, that little EP was enough to get me all in a tizzy for this new doomed demon. In the year of our Jørn 2020, I finally get the chance to sample the first full batch of this witch’s brew. The formula is the perfect representation of the K.I.S.S. method. Keep It Simple, Stupid.” Room full o’ goth doom.

Angellore – Rien Ne Devait Mourir Review

Angellore – Rien Ne Devait Mourir Review

“Five years is a long time to go between albums. A lot of time to refine a particular sound is often exactly what bands need to put out their most spectacular releases. On the other hand, expectation is a tricky demon, and it bites both ways. For Angellore, a gothic/doom metal band from France, it’s been five years since the release of La Litanie des Cendres, and, I have to admit, my expectations are a bit high for Rien Ne Devait Mourir, Angellore’s third full-length.” More is more.

Dawn of Solace – Waves Review

Dawn of Solace – Waves Review

“As a big fan of Tuomas Saukkonen’s Before the Dawn and Black Sun Aeon projects (R.I.P. to both), I was the natural demographic for his melancholy melodeath vehicle, Dawn of Solace as well. 2006s The Darkness was a beautiful and haunting dose of Finnish gloom that made an impression, and I always wondered why he never released another album under that name. Now in 2020 he finally delivers the followup outing titled Waves.” Surfing blues.

Dominia – The Withering of the Rose Review

Dominia – The Withering of the Rose Review

The Withering is the follow-up to 2017’s Stabat Mater, which represented another slab of heavy gothic metal in Dominia’s catalog, as violins and keys did battle with harsh vocals and doomy riffs. Does the latest offering from Dominia see further growth or, well, a withering on the vine?” Roses are dead.

The River – Vessels into White Tides Review

The River – Vessels into White Tides Review

“December is usually not the best time to go for a dip in the promo sump. Historically this is the month where we get deluged with re-releases and more low-fi basement black metal than a barrel full of Vardans could churn out in a fortnight. It takes a steady hand to reach into the brackish murk and pull out something promising, and fortunately, nothing is as steady as the iron hand ov Steel. That brings us to the new release by UK experimental Goth/doom act The River.” Follow The River.

Öxxö Xööx – Ÿ Review

Öxxö Xööx – Ÿ Review

“To begin, Öxxö Xööx sits most comfortably under the doom metal umbrella, tending towards (but not exclusively using) slower rhythms and riffs, and leveraging gothic instrumentation such as organs, harpsichords and string sections. But Ÿ is far from any ordinary doom release with which you may be familiar. It’s a distinctly singular release, a patchwork of textures, timbres and tempos with the words “AVANT GARDE” metaphorically stitched over the top.” Ÿ no Igorrlips mumblepants.