Incantation

Shed the Skin – The Forbidden Arts Review

Shed the Skin – The Forbidden Arts Review

“We all know a veteran metalhead who shows up to every gig – that older fella who has been going to shows since 1974, standing in the same spot, never going to the toilet, just nodding his head and occasionally, slowly, raising horns to the sky. He usually has wispy grey-white hair that flows, wizard like, to his ankles. He usually wears a faded Morbid Angel t-shirt purchased at a ’87 gig when they passed through the town. He has a battle jacket packed with patches of obscure speed-metal bands from 1985 and crust-punk bands from Wales. He was born on the sticky floor of the venue. He is God. The members of Shed the Skin are the same. They’re the grizzled veterans of the death metal scene.” Olde skin.

Skeletal – Bitterness and Burning Hatred Review

Skeletal – Bitterness and Burning Hatred Review

“I have mixed feelings towards modern death metal. On one hand, you have a lot of bands doing pretty cool stuff, like the warped songwriting of Blood Incantation or the hardcore underpinnings of Xibalba. On the other hand, few of these modern bands are anywhere near as good as the classics. That certainly doesn’t stop them from trying, however, and Finland’s Skeletal are the latest looking to leave their mark on the scene.” Tastes like burning.

Decrepid – Endless Sea of Graves Review

Decrepid – Endless Sea of Graves Review

Decrepid is a death metal band from the UK. Predictably, I didn’t guess that on my first listen to Endless Sea of Graves wherein, like any responsible critic, I ignored every digital square inch of promo material the label sent me. Decrepid sound American to my ears, taking most of their songwriting cues from Immolation, Incantation, and Monstrosity and their production cues from Morrisound.” Death over nations.

Funeralopolis – …of Deceit and Utter Madness Review

Funeralopolis – …of Deceit and Utter Madness Review

“Though I used to be a die hard death metal junkie, the past few years have found me sampling of it only sparingly, and mostly limited to the melodeath variant. I’m not sure if it’s current events or the need to stay in prolonged lockdown these past few months, but I’ve been on a major death kick of late, spinning heaps of old Suffocation, Incantation and Immolation albums at odd hours. This in turn led me to fish for noxious promos suited to my current listening predilection, and that’s where Switzerland’s Funeralopolis come in.” Forgotten pass.

Black Curse – Endless Wound Review

Black Curse – Endless Wound Review

Endless Wound is so singular in its focus, so confident in its ability to do one thing extremely fucking well, that any convoluted preamble would be far too indulgent. So, convoluted, indulgent preamble aside, I will simply say this: Endless Wound feels like a future death metal classic.” Black curse, bold words.

Cemetery Filth – Dominion Review

Cemetery Filth – Dominion Review

“For such an iconic band, there aren’t many modern groups that sound very much like Death. Sure, Gruesome‘s whole schtick is sounding like them and Skeletal Remains have a hearty Death influence, but compared to the legions of bands that mimic Entombed or Incantation, Chuck Schuldiner’s brainchild seems underrepresented. After Live Burial answered the call earlier this month, Atlanta’s Cemetery Filth are here with their Dominion debut to profess their own love of Schuldiner’s work.” I am become Death.

Live Burial – Unending Futility Review

Live Burial – Unending Futility Review

“I went back (and forward) through the Death discography, and I quickly became enamored by Chuck Schuldiner’s skill, passion, and ability to gather phenomenally talented musicians together to create an audible snapshot of his brilliant mind on each successive album. Well, after only a few minutes of listening to Unending Futility by Live Burial, it becomes quite clear that the British band shares my affinity for Chuck’s music.” Death unburied.

Twitch of the Death Nerve – A Resting Place for the Wrathful Review

Twitch of the Death Nerve – A Resting Place for the Wrathful Review

Twitch of the Death Nerve is a modern brutal death metal band from jolly old England, beginning in 2004 and, including sophomore release A Resting Place for the Wrathful, have two full-lengths and one split contribution to their name. By the time their first full-length dropped in 2014, death metal had gone through effectively every relevant mutation – their influences are vast and plenty.” Wrath never sleeps.