King Crimson

Zedi Forder – Isolation (and Zedi Forder Superium – Judgement) Review

Zedi Forder – Isolation (and Zedi Forder Superium – Judgement) Review

“As summer draws near, something has been lacking. Not the patio beers, or the large gatherings, something I couldn’t quite put my finger on until the kind lads from Zedi Forder sent me their latest work, Isolation, a few weeks ago. Then I remembered what an awesome summer band these guys are.” Wherein our hero writes a blog post about his summer drinking habits. Oh, and reviews a couple weirdo metal records from the band Zedi Forder.

Rose Tint: El Cuervo’s Discoveries of 2019

Rose Tint: El Cuervo’s Discoveries of 2019

“Following my last couple of year-end lists, it should now not come as a shock that I spent more time fleshing out my historical knowledge of music than my contemporary knowledge. In honor of my abject failure in keeping my eye on the present, I have received approval to document my ever-deeper plundering of previous decades in an article detailing my favorite older records which I first heard in 2019.” Old things, young ears.

Dysrhythmia – Terminal Threshold Review

Dysrhythmia – Terminal Threshold Review

“It’s been almost three years to the day since I reviewed Dysrhythmia’s last album, The Veil of Control. Of course that one appealed to me: it was loaded with virile, complex songs that at times borrowed heavily from King Crimson⁠—specifically, that band’s The ConstruKction of Light era. Dark, heavy, and discordant, it all added up to an enjoyable romp through instrumental prog-metal fields. By not overstaying its welcome (6 songs in 36 minutes), the album managed to hold my attention longer than many other instrumental prog albums.” Prog with a punch.

Yer Prog Is Olde: King Crimson – In the Court of the Crimson King

Yer Prog Is Olde: King Crimson – In the Court of the Crimson King

“What do you do when it’s the middle of summer, the promo sump is at an all-time low, and what’s in it has been greedily snapped up by the hordes of n00bs who are running rampant in the halls? Well, you write about an album that’s older than all of these n00bs, and better than anything coming out this summer. You write about an album that is a mere ten days older than Yours Truly.[1. And for the Cheeseheads here, is exactly the same age as the massage-loving Brett Favre.] You write about an album that has had more of an impact on progressive rock than most people’s parents have had on them. Yes, my friends, you write about King Crimson’s debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King.” Hail to the King.

Sacri Monti – Waiting Room for the Magic Hour

Sacri Monti – Waiting Room for the Magic Hour

“July of 2015 was a good time in my life. I had recently discovered Wilderun, I was getting my first real taste of the work which would become my profession and I was spreading my wings in the capital of my great nation. It concluded with a decent self-titled record by Sacri Monti, a Californian psychedelic rock band paying tribute to the 60s and 70s. The passage of 4 years has seen little new material until now, with the release of the rather excellently-entitled new album, Waiting Room for the Magic Hour. Will it bode the beginning of a strong July of 2019?” Boys of Summer.

O.R.k. – Ramagehead Review

O.R.k. – Ramagehead Review

“It’s not often that so-called super-groups stick around for more than one or two albums. Invariably, the novelty of working together wears off, and competing priorities pull members in other directions. That hasn’t been the case with multinational prog rockers O.R.k., though: Ramagehead is the band’s third album, appearing like clockwork almost two years to the day after their superb Soul of an Octopusrecord. The quartet remains unchanged as well: the big names are Pat Mastelotto (King Crimson) on drums and Colin Edwin (Porcupine Tree) on bass, but guitarist Carmelo Pipitone and singer/composer LEF are not to be ignored.” Ramage Inc.

Totenmesse – To Review

Totenmesse – To Review

To was advertised to me as “dark ambient” and it felt mightily appropriate to absorb something subtle and atmospheric considering the (finally) dropping temperatures here in Western Europe. Alas, it was immediately apparent to me that it is, in fact, black metal of the Polish ilk and while it may be dark, it most certainly demanded my attention more directly than ambient. In many ways, it’s typical of the Polish scene to draw on death metal in the formulation of its black metal. But is there more to say beyond this?” Come for the genre mislabeling, stay for the Polish hospitality.

Between the Buried and Me – Automata II Review

Between the Buried and Me – Automata II Review

“July is “Part Two” month for me, and first up is the second half of Between the Buried and Me’s double album, Automata. Take a moment, if you will, to reacquaint yourself with the first half of this opus. Too lazy to click: Well, to summarize, BTBAM wrote their usual long album, but new record label Sumerian suggested they split it in half and stagger the release. That allows those folks who can’t stomach an hour of music to take it in smaller bursts.” A band of many parts.