King Crimson

Snares of Sixes – MoonBladder Review

Snares of Sixes – MoonBladder Review

“Jason William Walton. By my count, this guy has been a part, or founder, of at least 24 bands, collaborations and projects. Most notably, of course, as bassist (and sometimes songwriter) for the much-missed Agalloch. Other entries in Walton’s bio include folk-doom outfit Dolven, the bonkers electronic oompah of Especially Likely Sloth and progressive melodeath band Sculptured. Walton strides across broad musical lands, arriving at Snares of Sixes, an experimental collective ‘assembled, arranged and constructed by him.” Constructed insanity.

Exist – Egoiista Review

Exist – Egoiista Review

“It wasn’t until a couple of months ago that I heard of Exist. However, this Baltimore band has been around for over a decade, with their debut EP coming out back in 2010, and Egoiista is the group’s third full-length release. Most of the material here was conceived at the same time as the band’s last album, 2017’s So True, So Bound, and has been honed and refined over the past few years. Max Phelps is the leader here. He had a brief stint as guitarist in Cynic earlier this decade, and one can definitely hear that influence at times on Egoiista. This is a modern progressive metal album in the sense that it makes use of plenty of instrumental dynamics, and plenty of clean/harsh vocal transitions. Plenty of bands do this; not all succeed. So how about Exist?” Leggo my Ego!

Zedi Forder – Isolation (and Zedi Forder Superium – Judgement) Review

Zedi Forder – Isolation (and Zedi Forder Superium – Judgement) Review

“As summer draws near, something has been lacking. Not the patio beers, or the large gatherings, something I couldn’t quite put my finger on until the kind lads from Zedi Forder sent me their latest work, Isolation, a few weeks ago. Then I remembered what an awesome summer band these guys are.” Wherein our hero writes a blog post about his summer drinking habits. Oh, and reviews a couple weirdo metal records from the band Zedi Forder.

Rose Tint: El Cuervo’s Discoveries of 2019

Rose Tint: El Cuervo’s Discoveries of 2019

“Following my last couple of year-end lists, it should now not come as a shock that I spent more time fleshing out my historical knowledge of music than my contemporary knowledge. In honor of my abject failure in keeping my eye on the present, I have received approval to document my ever-deeper plundering of previous decades in an article detailing my favorite older records which I first heard in 2019.” Old things, young ears.

Dysrhythmia – Terminal Threshold Review

Dysrhythmia – Terminal Threshold Review

“It’s been almost three years to the day since I reviewed Dysrhythmia’s last album, The Veil of Control. Of course that one appealed to me: it was loaded with virile, complex songs that at times borrowed heavily from King Crimson⁠—specifically, that band’s The ConstruKction of Light era. Dark, heavy, and discordant, it all added up to an enjoyable romp through instrumental prog-metal fields. By not overstaying its welcome (6 songs in 36 minutes), the album managed to hold my attention longer than many other instrumental prog albums.” Prog with a punch.

Yer Prog Is Olde: King Crimson – In the Court of the Crimson King

Yer Prog Is Olde: King Crimson – In the Court of the Crimson King

“What do you do when it’s the middle of summer, the promo sump is at an all-time low, and what’s in it has been greedily snapped up by the hordes of n00bs who are running rampant in the halls? Well, you write about an album that’s older than all of these n00bs, and better than anything coming out this summer. You write about an album that is a mere ten days older than Yours Truly.[1. And for the Cheeseheads here, is exactly the same age as the massage-loving Brett Favre.] You write about an album that has had more of an impact on progressive rock than most people’s parents have had on them. Yes, my friends, you write about King Crimson’s debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King.” Hail to the King.

Sacri Monti – Waiting Room for the Magic Hour

Sacri Monti – Waiting Room for the Magic Hour

“July of 2015 was a good time in my life. I had recently discovered Wilderun, I was getting my first real taste of the work which would become my profession and I was spreading my wings in the capital of my great nation. It concluded with a decent self-titled record by Sacri Monti, a Californian psychedelic rock band paying tribute to the 60s and 70s. The passage of 4 years has seen little new material until now, with the release of the rather excellently-entitled new album, Waiting Room for the Magic Hour. Will it bode the beginning of a strong July of 2019?” Boys of Summer.