The Haunted

Voice of Ruin – Acheron Review

Voice of Ruin – Acheron Review

Voice of Ruin know what they like to do and are continuing to do it. And “that” is melodic death-tinged thrash. Where Purge and Purify felt like out and out Lamb of God worship⁠—and there’s nothing inherently wrong with that⁠—Acheron sees Voice of Ruin expanding their sound a bit more.” Define “a bit.”

The Machinist – Confidimus in Morte Review

The Machinist – Confidimus in Morte Review

“Those who liked deathcore in its mid-2000s heyday tend to go through three phases in the following order: 1) earnestly liking deathcore, 2) loudly decrying deathcore to demonstrate one’s extreme metal fides, and 3) earnestly liking deathcore again with the added fun of nostalgia. This nostalgia doesn’t make bad music good, but rather recalls times, places, experiences, and memories where deathcore served as the soundtrack. Those times made us happy, and the soundtrack is what it is because that’s the soundtrack we chose. It follows that deathcore made us happy at one point. The vicarious thrill of great memories scored by it bolsters the appeal of the sounds which drew us in to begin with. You may not be able to go home again, but sometimes spinning the old records left in the dusty crates is wonderful.” The first step is admitting you have a problem.

Leach – Hymns for the Hollow Review

Leach – Hymns for the Hollow Review

“Ever since I was a wee n00bian babe, Steel Druhm has been threatening to smother me with a metalcore pillow. Personally, I’ve always lived by the adage “If thou must be smothered, thou shouldst at least choose the pillow.” So rather than let Steel continue to hang The Core of Damocles above my head, I decided I would take matters into my own hands and pick up the next available metalcore promo. Hymns for the Hollow is the second album from Swedish band Leach and upon first glance it seemed as if it would do the trick. Surely I will gain copious brownie points by volunteering for this selfless martyrdom, no?” Attach the Core of Triumph.

HateSphere – Reduced to Flesh Review

HateSphere – Reduced to Flesh Review

“Well, it’s been three years since we’ve heard anything from Denmark’s HateSphere. You know what that means. Another HateSphere record. As I’ve said before, I’m only mildly entertained by the Scandinavian groove/thrash of HateSphere. Because of this, they may never receive a glowing review from me but I gotta give ’em props. While not the most interesting band in their field, they are definitely one of the most consistent. With a new element here and a new vocal approach there, they keep their fanbase coming back for more. Not to mention they’ve been dropping albums every 1-3 years since 2001. And, now, after nearly two decades as a band, HateSphere is about to drop their tenth full-length release, Reduced to Flesh.” Don’t hate spheres.

Dark Hound – Dawning Review

Dark Hound – Dawning Review

“What’s your first impression when I say Dark Hound? No, this isn’t a trap. And, no, I’m not looking for anything perverted, so fucking stop. For me, Sherlock Holmes comes to mind. I don’t know… creepy dogs and shit? Anyway, with that, I would imagine the band’s music to be dark, brooding, and haunting—with an atmosphere to match. Well, no surprise, everything I thought was wrong. If anything, this Nashville, Tennessee quartet is anything but that.” Bro down(tuned).

The Haunted – Strength in Numbers Review

The Haunted – Strength in Numbers Review

“It’s strangely liberating to write about a high profile record after its official release when, presumably, all those interested in hearing it have done so and made their decisions on its merits or lack thereof. Such is the case with The Haunted’s new record, Strength in Numbers. Those who are longtime fans will already be enjoying their disc or LP, and those on the fence will likely not be swayed in their opinion by the prose of a halfway decent writer on the internet, but instead by another run-through on Spotify.” Revisiting old haunts.

Evocation – The Shadow Archetype Review

Evocation – The Shadow Archetype Review

“I still remember the day I ventured into the world of Swedish melodic death metal. The time, the mood, the buying of so many albums. There was At the Gates‘s Slaughter of the Soul, Dark Tranquillity‘s Projector and Damage Done, In FlamesJester Race and Clayman, The Haunted‘s debut and Made Me Do It, and Amon Amarth‘s Fate of Norns. All purchased and consumed within weeks of each other. I was fucking hooked—ignoring reason (and my food budget) to please my insatiable craving for everything this genre had to offer.” The Left Hand Path has many toll booths.