Tomb Mold

Faceless Burial – Speciation Review

Faceless Burial – Speciation Review

“Sometimes you know within seconds that an album is going to absolutely rule. I knew it when I heard the chimes in Desolate Endscape. I knew it when I heard the first riff of “Cognitive Sedation Butchery.” This time I knew it when I heard three notes – guitar, bass, and snare – and fell into a tetanic stupor, fists clenched in ecstasy, tongue projected out to the state line. Faceless Burial just made a modern classic in old school death metal.” Endangering species.

Voidceremony – Entropic Reflections Continuum: Dimensions Unravel Review

Voidceremony – Entropic Reflections Continuum: Dimensions Unravel Review

“With heavyweights like Tomb Mold and Blood Incantation drowning in the love of the underground, proggy OSDM has never been so widely celebrated or practiced. If you’re a player in the death metal underground, that makes it an ideal time to switch focus from your nasty death metal band to your proggy death metal band and release your inscrutably titled debut album.” Void where prohibited.

Superterrestrial – The Void that Exists Review

Superterrestrial – The Void that Exists Review

“Writing fresh introductions for black metal reviews becomes exponentially more difficult with each new attempt. Case in point: I have already written this entire review, sans introduction, because I had no clue how to introduce Superterrestrial. Like many modern underground dwellers, they revel in secrecy. Not only are the band members’ roles undisclosed, but information on The Void that Exists available online at the time of this writing is so scarce that Metal Archives has mistakenly categorized it as a two-track EP.” Mystery + apathy = Mapathy.

Lord Gore – Scalpels for Blind Surgeons Review

Lord Gore – Scalpels for Blind Surgeons Review

Scalpels for Blind Surgeons is only the band’s third album and follows their lengthy hiatus from 2006 to 2017. Their 2002 debut The Autophagous Orgy and 2004’s Resickened were burly deathgrind heavily informed by Impetigo, complete with plenty of horror movie samples and thick meaty riffs. Scalpels is a different beast and in some ways even better. Support the differently abled.

Carnal Tomb – Abhorrent Veneration Review

Carnal Tomb – Abhorrent Veneration Review

“I’m sitting here watching the sun illuminate the leaves of the many trees in my gigantic new backyard, and I’m finally allowing myself to entertain a glimmer of hope that this all might work out. Ask Mrs. Holdeneye and she will tell you that I can become quite despondent and Eeyore-like when exposed to even mild amounts of stress, so moving twice this year has affected my baseline mood significantly. Perhaps this explains why I’ve been listening to far more death metal during the last few months than is my norm — I’ve been unconsciously trying to vent the frustration that comes from uncertainty and constant change, things I love just about as much as Ron Swanson does.”Stressball deathball.

Tomb Mold – Planetary Clairvoyance Review

Tomb Mold – Planetary Clairvoyance Review

“Little over a year later, Tomb Mold have returned with a third death metal opus, and things have changed. Planetary Clairvoyance is drastically evolved. Now in our midst is a star-spawned abomination, multi-formed and voracious. If the preceding records were a baring of teeth, then this collection is surely the war-turn for this dread conqueror worm.” Olde mold is bold.

Carnation – Chapel of Abhorrence Review

Carnation – Chapel of Abhorrence Review

“To most people, the word ‘carnation’ refers to a frilly colored flower. Belgium’s Carnation aren’t most people. In fact, if the music on this death metal quintet’s debut is any indication, to them a ‘carnation’ is a 14-foot Venus flytrap-esque monstrosity with teeth like steak knives and vines that could crush your puny little ribcage like a bag of potato chips.” Morbid flora.

Tomb Mold – Manor of Infinite Forms Review

Tomb Mold – Manor of Infinite Forms Review

“Life can often be confusing, gross and unnecessarily sticky. Three words one might use to describe Canada’s Tomb Mold, who, after tearing classic death metal asunder with 2017’s debut, Primordial Malignity, have since returned with an expanded line-up and another installation of their corporal jigsore quandry. Manor of Infinite Forms arrives rancid, raucous and ready to rot.” Rotting in the free world.