Carcass

Necros Christos – Domedon Doxomedon Review

Necros Christos – Domedon Doxomedon Review

“Some say 42 minutes is the optimal album length. Others may say 50. Some an hour, some half an hour. But rarely does a person declare 112 minutes as being the optimal album length. Well, ladies and gentlemen, I’ve got a sweet 112-minute triple album for you here. Oh boy. D.R. Grier is still wallowing in astral misery following his review of Midnight Odyssey‘s two hour plus Shards of Silver Fade. He sits in the corner of the staff room muttering cosmological gibberish into an empty Carl Sagan mug. Grymm meanders in circles and wears a heavy cloak as he recites dark poetry influenced by his review of Cultes Des Ghoules 100-minute blackened-opera Coven, or Evil Ways Instead of LoveSteel is still lost somewhere between Songs From the North II and Songs From The North III: we hope for his swift return. Now it’s my turn — a rite of passage.” Size queenery.

At The Gates – To Drink From The Night Itself Review

At The Gates – To Drink From The Night Itself Review

“Reunions are a mixed bag. When a band leaves the scene and returns after a long lay-off, an unhealthy set of expectations arrive with them; rose-colored prescription-strength glasses are adorned, pedestals are painstakingly crafted, and we all expect said band to simultaneously grow and yet stay the same. Case in point: At The Gates.” At the Reunion.

Interview with Sven de Caluwé of Aborted

Interview with Sven de Caluwé of Aborted

“During the four days of maritime metal mayhem that was 70,000 Tons of Metal earlier this month, I was lucky enough to snag an interview with Sven de Caluwé, vocalist and founding member of famed Belgian death metal band Aborted. As the mastermind behind songs about serial killers, medical deviance, and (strangely enough) even poop, Sven has led his minions through albums like 2003’s iconic Goremageddon and, most recently,  2016’s warmly received Retrogore. Jittery with fanboyism (and more than a few Fosters) Sven was kind enough to overlook my obvious amateurism to talk about the band’s past, their upcoming Devastation on the Nation tour, and even some juicy details on the new album. Strap on that cadaver apron and read on!” We said strap it on!

Yer Metal Is Olde: Brutal Truth – Extreme Conditions Demand Extreme Responses

Yer Metal Is Olde: Brutal Truth – Extreme Conditions Demand Extreme Responses

“Formed in 1990 by prolific bass-slinging band whore Dan Lilker (Anthrax, Nuclear Assault, Blurring, Venomous Concept, S.O.D. & many others), New York’s Brutal Truth threw their hats into the grind ring and captured lightning in a bottle with their phenomenal 1992 debut, Extreme Conditions Demand Extreme Responses; a dead-set grind classic, now certified as an olde motherfucker. There’s something special about Brutal Truth’s underappreciated debut that sets it apart from pretty much any other grind album I’ve experienced.” The ugly truth.

Yer Metal Is Olde: Zao – Where Blood and Fire Bring Rest

Yer Metal Is Olde: Zao – Where Blood and Fire Bring Rest

“Let’s just say you’re in a hardcore band with a niche-but-loyal audience. You just completed a major festival, embarked on a fairly successful US tour, and you’re about to write your next album when your bandmates decide, ‘Hey, you know what? I’m giving up music for the ministry.’ Folks, that’s what happened in 1997, to Jesse Smith, (now former) drummer for (then-)Virginia’s Christian hardcore outfit, Zao.” Cross-core and more.

Thy Serpent’s Cult – Supremacy of Chaos Review

Thy Serpent’s Cult – Supremacy of Chaos Review

“The world has moved on, woe Discordia, and every day sees more and more elements of the past being phased out of existence. Goodbye, Pogs. Farewell, AIM. RIP Nu-Metal (no, seriously, please rest). The sands of time are a cruel invading force, whatever will they snatch up next? Chile’s Thy Serpent’s Cult may be bowing out of the fight after nine years of thrashing to death, but their answer, given in their swan scream album Supremacy of Chaos, remains as trve and timeless as ever: Not our fucking death metal.” Time waits for no band.

Exhumed – Death Revenge Review

Exhumed – Death Revenge Review

“Like a fine wine, the mighty Exhumed keep getting better with age. The career parallels with their idols Carcass are obvious but not debilitating, manipulating their worship into their own finely honed death metal machine. From the grimy days of their fun and gruesome 1998 debut Gore Metal, through to 2013’s excellent Necrocracy, Exhumed’s career has been on a constant upward trajectory of consistency, refinement and dependable quality. With the focus of Matt Harvey and co on various other projects in recent years, the band finally dusted themselves off and returned to the studio to record a goddamn concept album!” Feeling offal? Try more gore!

Execration – Return to the Void Review

Execration – Return to the Void Review

“It’s easy to wonder if death metal is currently in the midst of an existential crisis. In one sense, it perpetually is; its obsession with mortality is such that everyone from Martin Heidegger to Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine would tell the genre to chill out a bit. On the other hand, the acts that find themselves popular with critics wear a different sort of existential crisis on their sleeves, one of existential malaise. As one should always be wary of virtually everything that critics (along with intellectuals and “experts”) tell them, everyone ought to be extremely cautious about the “future” of death metal and the current state of the classic sound. Norway’s Execration is one of the bands in the thick of this existential crisis.” Musical Pokemon.

70000 Tons of Metal: One Man’s Journey

70000 Tons of Metal: One Man’s Journey

“My friends ask me what happened, but my ability to verbally communicate has been reduced to moaning and a weeping noise that sounds something like a baby panda crying for milk. I wonder how I’m going to make it through the final day of this floating festival. I wonder when the aching will subside. I wonder where my life went so wrong. How did I end up here, on the 7th annual 70000 Tons of Metal cruise, weak with exhaustion and feeling like my body has been bludgeoned with a sledgehammer? My mind drifts back…” Tales from a 70000 ton heavy thing.

Lubricant – Swallow This Review

Lubricant – Swallow This Review

“One of death metal’s weirdest phenomenon was the so-called ‘death ‘n’ roll’ movement. First popularized by albums like Entombed’s Wolverine Blues and Carcass’s Swansong, death ‘n’ roll is kind of like your weird older cousin at the family reunion. On one hand, you have to love him because he’s family — but at the same time, nobody really talks about him or seems to be totally comfortable in his presence. Point is, death ‘n’ roll is one of those genres that most people seem to tolerate rather than actually enjoy, and maybe that’s why bands like Lubricant are so often overlooked.” Death rock in a tight place.