My Dying Bride

Tethra – Empire of the Void Review

Tethra – Empire of the Void Review

“Space is very metal. I don’t refer to the space between you and the nearest hunting knife, of course, but rather to outer space, which has captured the imagination of metalheads from all walks of the genre’s spectrum. Today brings Tethra’s Empire of the Void into the mix, a monstrous slab of death-doom designed to crush and inspire.” Void rage.

The Medea Project – Sisyphus Review

The Medea Project – Sisyphus Review

“You know, I’d never really considered it before, but it’s funny gothic and doom metal are not more frequently bedfellows. After all, the two genres have a lot in common: morose atmosphere, flair for the dramatic, favored color black (alright, that last one may go for everything more extreme than power metal). And sure, there’s some big names that have wed the styles at some point in their careers, like My Dying Bride or Tiamat. But it never became a household mixture the way death thrash or prog power did. Well, The Medea Project want to make their mark with just such a sound.” Drama club.

My Dying Bride – The Ghost of Orion Review

My Dying Bride – The Ghost of Orion Review

“When you think of quality doom metal, just about everyone will mention My Dying Bride within the first five bands listed, if not the first. For thirty years, the British sextet’s captivated the world over with their trademark blend of crushing riffs, sorrowful violins and keyboards, and the cavernous growls and pained singing of charismatic frontman Aaron Stainthorpe. So impacting their music has become that they’re the soundtrack to personal situations in peoples’ lives, including mine.” Familiar haunts.

Angry Metal Primer – My Dying Bride

Angry Metal Primer – My Dying Bride

Over 40 years of metal’s biological urge (and a hefty lack of restraint) has resulted in some incomprehensibly large catalogs. No one should have to listen to anywhere from 13 to 15 [Luca Turilli’s] Rhapsody [of Fire] albums just to get caught up for a new release. So each week (as required and/or able), we’re offering a selection of prime(r)(er) cuts to get you up to speed. Without further ado, welcome to My Dying Bride‘s Primer of Sadness.

Godthrymm – Reflections Review

Godthrymm – Reflections Review

“Valentine’s Day is normally reserved for lovers. Cards are exchanged, chocolates and red velvety things are consumed, uglies are bumped… Valentine’s Day is a time that romance, passion, and love fill the air. But you know what pairs well with VD? DOOM. Not just any doom metal, mind you, but rather oppressive, downtrodden, and lightless British DOOM, complete with bold typeface and italics. And who better to serve you that kind of doom than not one, but two former members of My Dying Bride?” Heavy love.

Grey Skies Fallen – Cold Dead Lands Review

Grey Skies Fallen – Cold Dead Lands Review

“It is somehow appropriate that I find myself listening intently to an album called Cold Dead Lands, by a band called Grey Skies Fallen, while we endure the coldest week of the year. Canada in the winter is pretty much a cold dead land, so it was fatefully wise of me to sign up for this review. There’s nothing more fitting to listen to when it is -33 Celsius outside than some long-form doom metal, especially if it comes from a veteran New York band’s fifth full-length, cunningly mixed by Dan Swanö.” Frozen and slow.

Kaoteon – Kaoteon Review

Kaoteon – Kaoteon Review

“With a one-sheet that closed with “FFO: Behemoth, MardukWatain, and My Dying Bride,” I expected competently played blackened death metal… with weepy violins, morose lyrics, or whatever else that could possibly be associated with My Dying Bride that would potentially throw a huge monkey wrench into the classic blackened death metal formula.” If you can dodge a wrench….

Officium Triste – The Death of Gaia Review

Officium Triste – The Death of Gaia Review

“25 years is a damn long time for a band to exist, though not so much if you’re a doom metal act. Officium Triste celebrates that milestone this year, but somehow The Death of Gaia, sixth full-length overall and first with Transcending Obscurity Records, is the first time I’ve heard this veteran Dutch act.” Unearthing the doom.

Profetus – The Sadness of Time Passing Review

Profetus – The Sadness of Time Passing Review

“From the first minutes, it will be obvious to followers of the style that Profetus model their slow trudging misery after funeral forefathers Thergothon and Skepticism. This makes sense, as all three bands hail from Finland, home of the world’s most metal bands per capita at two bands per person.” Remembrance of heavy things past.