Prophecy Productions

Bethlehem – Lebe Dich Leer Review

Bethlehem – Lebe Dich Leer Review

“I had picked Lebe Dich Leer for my review queue simply because it sounded interesting, only to find out that they were a foundational band in the development of suicidal black metal and their history was surrounded by controversy over false accusations of Satanism by concerned parents/idiots. An intimidating prospect for sure. So as you proceed, keep in mind that the following is from the perspective of someone venturing out of their comfort zone and new to the story of Bethlehem in general, so you can safely ignore my opinion if it suits you.” Green is the new black.

A Forest of Stars – Grave Mounds and Grave Mistakes Review

A Forest of Stars – Grave Mounds and Grave Mistakes Review

A Forest of Stars have been traveling on an upwards cosmic trajectory since their third full-length, 2012’s A Shadowplay for Yesterdays. For a band who didn’t have plans to record anything after their 2008 debut, or even play live, A Forest of Stars are a great example of what a collective and relentless passion and creativity can do for a band.” Starry starry night.

Finnr’s Cane – Elegy Review

Finnr’s Cane – Elegy Review

“Canada’s Finnr’s Cane are much more than their limiting label might suggest. Inspired by the rugged beauty of their country, third album, Elegy, draws great gasps of atmosphere and exhales somber doom with every breath, adding some much-needed weight to the genre. But, as Finnr’s Cane‘s music is often improvisational, and considering their penchant for rambling ephemera, I am left to wonder if the band can steer their vehicle in the appropriate direction.” Citizen Caning.

GlerAkur – The Mountains Are Beautiful Now Review

GlerAkur – The Mountains Are Beautiful Now Review

“It will be a long time before I can afford to visit Iceland, so I rely on music created by the likes of GlerAkur, an instrumental project of National Theater of Iceland sound engineer Elvar Geir Sævarsson, to deliver hearty wedges of this magical land to my adoring ears. Sævarsson’s seen its sights, breathed its air, and felt its magic, and from this he’s carved his vision of Iceland into a solid block of music.” Affordable ear travel.

Völur – Ancestors Review

Völur – Ancestors Review

“Dread, despair, and impending doom were forged when Tony Iommi dragged his world-weary, calloused, and disfigured hands over the steel of his signature Epiphone. What is doom metal, then, when the lead guitar is replaced by the dreamy and ethereal violin? How can dread and despair pass through the strings of a fragile violin?’ The new face of classic(al) doom.

Farsot – Fail.lure Review

Farsot – Fail.lure Review

Farsot are a peculiar entity. Extravagantly cryptic conceptual themes are as just as important to them as their unusual experimental black-metal sound. This German quintet is drenched in mystery, consisting of bandmembers with names that roll off the tongue with sensual ease. Vocalist 10.XIXt, guitarists Pi: 1T 5r and 3818.w, bassist v.03/170, and drummer R 215k combine to paint an avant-garden of musical eden for fans of eccentricity and unpredictability.” The garden is getting a little wild.

Les Discrets – Prédateurs Review

Les Discrets – Prédateurs Review

“Prepare to enter the realm of the Non-Metal. Formed in 2003, Les Discrets are a French project started by illustrator Fursy Teyssier as a way of musically expressing the concepts in his visual art. Post-black connoisseurs may recognize Teyssier as having played alongside Alcest‘s Neige in depressive rock collective Amesoeurs, in addition to producing artwork for Empyrium, Wood of Ypres, and Alcest themselves.” Be less discreet, dammit!