Bolt Thrower

1914 – Where Fear and Weapons Meet Review

1914 – Where Fear and Weapons Meet Review

“If I said that a new 1914 album is a big deal for me, it would be a huge understatement. The band’s 2018 opus The Blind Leading the Blind was one of the first records I covered for this site—and my first 4.0. I was still a probationary writer at the time, and as a brand new music journalist, watching the metalverse collectively lose its mind over what 1914 accomplished on that record was a surreal and humbling experience. 1914 have already demonstrated that they are consummate pros with a clear strategic objective, and I would have been shocked if 2021 follow-up Where Fear and Weapons Meet was anything less than great.” War 4 sale.

Antichrist Siege Machine – Purifying Blade Review

Antichrist Siege Machine – Purifying Blade Review

Antichrist Siege Machine paints the gates of metal with the blood of Christendom. Subtlety is not their strongest trait. Berserk and bludgeoning attacks, void of humanity, are at the core of this Virginian duo’s battering ram. Antichrist Siege Machine’s debut full-length, 2019’s Schism Perpetration, kick-started their brainless siege against nuance. The record is 28-minutes of celestial warfare fetishization. Blazing chariots rip through flesh, worshipers are disemboweled on altars, Satan opens up his fiery pit wherever he pleases, and a general state of empyrean slaughter is captured through deep, churning metal. The war against Christendom is unrelenting and Antichrist Siege Machine has spotted another chance for carnage.” Blade in full.

Expunged – Into Never Shall Review

Expunged – Into Never Shall Review

“What would you do if you came into possession of a functioning time travel device? Some would undoubtedly set out to right great historical wrongs. Noble stuff that. Unlike these do-gooders, the three low-life bastards in Expunged would blast back to 1990 and make Left Hand Path way more raw, ugly and unpolished. Also a noble endeavor if you ask me.” Violent revision.

Crescent – Carving the Fires of Akhet Review

Crescent – Carving the Fires of Akhet Review

“I’ve said it before and, Ra be damned, I’ll say it again. I love eastern themes in metal. As a result, my interest is naturally piqued by any band utilizing those progressions or from that part of the world. I discussed this at length in my review of Crescent‘s 2018 album The Order of Amenti. These Egyptians definitely know how to implement dynamic scales amidst stone-cracking riffs. Now, ignited with a little new blood, Carving the Fires of Akhet prepares to descend on the masses in a flurry of smoke and ash.” Axe, wax or wane?

Cerebral Rot – Excretion of Mortality Review

Cerebral Rot – Excretion of Mortality Review

“I love death metal that pushes its own boundaries but, ironically, it’s the old school that feeds my education. That disgusting urge to claw and crush that transcends all common decency and hearkens back to a time when “fully-functioning adults” didn’t learn to speak via fucking Reddit. Cerebral Rot know a little of what I’m talking about. Their primal death-breath is one I can stand to gasp any day of the week. Debut album Odious Descent into Decay hit my schedule in 2019 and, although well executed, there was noticeable room for improvement. Now, Excretion of Mortality looms large on the devolutionary chain and one thing is clear, this Seattle four-piece are out for blood.” Brains!

Moanhand – Present Serpent Review

Moanhand – Present Serpent Review

“Try as I might, it’s hard to break out of patterns that take months, if not years, to craft and make a template out of. I still put actual milk in my coffee and not that oily Coffeemate bullshit. My breakfast omelets will always have cheddar cheese, bacon, and enough garlic to anger vampires. Above all, I like my doom metal to be… doom metal. Heavy. Oppressive. Mournful. That said, sometimes a little deviation can work wonders, and Roman Filatov, chief songwriter and solo proprietor of Moanhand, is seeking to woo the masses over with his creative take on a classic sound using a wide swath of influences.” Snake’s take.

Killing Addiction – Mind of a New God Review

Killing Addiction – Mind of a New God Review

“Don’t judge a book by its cover. Don’t make your mind up too soon. Things aren’t necessarily always what they seem to be. If you’re about my age and used to watch Thomas the Tank Engine, the above has triggered a flashback and you’ve now got the melody of that song stuck in your head wherein it shall remain for at least twenty-four hours. It’s good advice though, because Killing Addiction’s choice of cover for their second LP Mind of a New God looks like the concept art for a rejected Mortal Kombat boss that you can’t play as in multiplayer. Despite the cover, it shouldn’t be overlooked.” Killing business.

Grave Miasma – Abyss of Wrathful Deities Review

Grave Miasma – Abyss of Wrathful Deities Review

“It scares me to say this but it’s been 5 entire years since the last Grave Miasma release. Almost everything in my life has changed since that point and I would like to think (perhaps naively) that I’m better now than I was then. I respected and enjoyed 2016’s Endless Pilgrimage which offered 30 minutes of brutal but atmospheric music across a mini-LP, but with only one prior full-length and a handful of EPs across nearly 20 years, does Abyss of Wrathful Deities find Grave Miasma able to make the same comment about themselves?” Malaise in the grave.

Endseeker – Mount Carcass Review

Endseeker – Mount Carcass Review

“When I pluck a festering slab of death metal from the fetid pit that is our promo sump – a rare enough occurrence for me – the last thing I expect to be presented with is a political message. No doubt those more learned in the ways of death, will point me in the direction of many a OSDM band that deals in heavy politics but my brain does not connect the genre with current affairs. Hamburg, Germany’s Endseeker, however, do just that on their third record, Mount Carcass.” Death in the news.

Insect Inside – The First Shining of New Genus Review

Insect Inside – The First Shining of New Genus Review

“Slam is a style I’ve never understood. Often layered with gory shock novelty and the variety of deathcore, bands like Abominable Putridity and Epicardiectomy have only gotten a head-scratch from me with endless “djunz” and br00tal “eeeeees”. Insect Inside is a young Russian trio from Zlatoust, a demo and single released since their 2017 inception. Debut LP The First Shining of New Genus creates the soundtrack of being eaten alive by the swarm in its beatdown of groovy, thick riffs, and hell-scraping gutturals.” Slam beetles.