American Metal

Yer Indefensible Metal is Olde: Linkin Park – Hybrid Theory

Yer Indefensible Metal is Olde: Linkin Park – Hybrid Theory

“Any attempts to explain the appeal and prevalence of nü-metal to someone who didn’t live through its invasion firsthand would surely be futile. Sure, even in its heyday there were plenty of anti-hipsters eager to decry the fledgling sub-genre to anyone not set to Away in their AIM directory, yet those of us who sipped on Surge instead of Haterade saw nü-metal as something more than a particularly loud Hot Topic clearance event.” Park and deride.

Testament – Titans of Creation Review

Testament – Titans of Creation Review

“Featuring the same star studded lineup as last time, Titans of Creation doesn’t mess with expectations, delivering a traditional thrash album with plenty of veteran know-how and high flying technical flair. I’d be lying if I said spinning it doesn’t offer some sense of stability and comfort in these uncertain times, but I’m here to examine how it fares as a thrash album, not a creature comfort.” Creation in a time of destruction.

Temple of Void – The World That Was Review

Temple of Void – The World That Was Review

“Debut album Of Terror and the Supernatural was a killer compound of death-doom. But Lords of Death also began to incorporate traits that might be more familiar to Alice in Chains or even Pearl Jam. Now, The World That Was prepares to thunder into immediate proximity with the same weight but a clear shift in intent. Fear thee not, ye acolytes and thralls –  monumental riffs still fill these halls. But, to quote the band, themselves: “your face is different, but we’ve met before…”” Killdozer or dozing off?

Perdition Temple – Sacraments of Descension Review

Perdition Temple – Sacraments of Descension Review

“Though Angelcorpse were only active for five years in their initial run, in that short time they managed to release three terrific albums and establish themselves as one of the most iconic blackened death metal bands of all time. After reuniting and releasing 2007’s Of Lucifer and Lightning to mediocre reception, the Kansas City group would split up again, with guitarist Gene Palubicki going on to showcase his ideas in Blasphemic Cruelty, Apocalypse Command, and Perdition Temple. It seems odd considering their slow rate of output, but Temple have easily been the most prolific of these three projects, with the band now on their third album since their 2009 inception.” Temple ov Anger.

Nite – Darkness Silence Mirror Flame Review

Nite – Darkness Silence Mirror Flame Review

“I’m an old dude and there’s no getting around it. Because of my advanced case of age, I’m much more susceptible to nostalgia-core than those younger than I, and when 80s-flavored fares are hawked, I’ll always elbow my way to the front and sample them lustily. Nite is a brand spanking new project by members of Dawnbringer, Satan’s Wrath and High Spirits, and what they’re cooking here is a rollicking mixture of classic 80s metal with a decidedly blackened edge.” Those glorious 80s Nites.

The Heavy Eyes – Love Like Machines Review

The Heavy Eyes – Love Like Machines Review

“The blues might be simple in theory – I mean, one of the first things we all learn is the 12-bar blues progression – but in practice it is a genre drenched in nuance, feel, and emotion. The technical part of the music is easy, but making it writhe with passion is anything but. It takes a different kind of skill to move people. Memphis’s The Heavy Eyes claim to infuse their version of delta blues with psychedelic fuzz and late 60s heavy rock in an attempt to bring us blissfully back to a disease-free era.” Love machines for all.

Hyborian – Vol. II Review

Hyborian – Vol. II Review

Hyborian first bored into my consciousness with their single, “Head and the Sword,” an absolutely killer song that showcased a suave combination of sludge, stoner, and prog influences. To this day it remains one of my favorite songs, and it paved the way to their debut album, Vol. I, which took that single and pushed the style into heavier territory, most notably with the vocals. Comparisons are for the lazy amongst us, and that includes me, so let me put forth that there is definitely influence from early Baroness and Mastodon buried in these riffy songs, along with no small dose of High on Fire.” CROMulent.

Fool’s Ghost – Dark Woven Light Review

Fool’s Ghost – Dark Woven Light Review

“Dark, cinematic, and dreamy is not the typical combination of descriptors used for bands signed to heavy metal label Prosthetic Records. Nevertheless, there’s a first time for everything. Prosthetic Records released one of my favorite metal albums of 2019 (Paladin‘s Ascension), and now they are releasing Dark Woven Light, the debut by Fool’s Ghost, a husband and wife duo from Louisville, Kentucky.” Haunting haunts.